Video: 40 Hadiths on Ramadhan by Mufti Muhammad Ibn Adam Al-Kawthari

Video: 40 Hadiths on Ramadhan by Mufti Muhammad Ibn Adam Al-Kawthari

Mufti Muhammad ibn Adam al-Kawthari narrates and explains 40 hadiths pertaining to Ramadhan and fasting. A very thorough and exhaustive discussion too difficult to find anywhere else!

What Not to Say! – Mental Health 4 Muslims

What Not to Say!

Taken from: Mental Health 4 Muslims

“Handle them carefully, for words have more power than atom bombs.” Pat Strachan Hurd


Have you ever been in a situation where someone you’re with (or perhaps even you, yourself) said something completely inappropriate and unintentionally offended someone else? Proverbially, we call this “putting your foot in your mouth,” and unfortunately for some it’s more of a syndrome than a single untimely blunder!

However innocent or unintentional such comments may seem, the truth is they can be very damaging to the one on the receiving end, especially people who are dealing with difficult and very private circumstances in their lives and may not know how to fend off excessive questions or unwelcome comments.  Because of their often vulnerable and fragile emotional states these people end up attracting the very attention they seek to avoid.  Concerned friends and family members may misjudge their silence and physical retreat for desperate cries for help and begin excessively prying for information about ‘what’s wrong’.  This can be a truly awkward, uncomfortable, and in some cases traumatic experience for the one whose life is being pried open like a tin can before their very eyes.

Being sensitive to people’s circumstances, using tact, and knowing when and how far to take a conversation is something that requires a concerted effort to truly pay attention to those around you.  Below are some guidelines to consider to help improve your social sensitivity skills.

Taboo Topics

You should never ask or probe someone about the following issues no matter how curious you are. If, however, during the course of a conversation someone volunteers information or begins to tell you about any of these things (with the exception of #6 & #7 for there is no justified reason other than the rare occasion where someone may need to seek counsel from a scholar, to give ear to such things) then that is entirely different. Just make sure that you’re not the one who initiates the discussion by actually asking about any of these matters.

  1. Age: A lot of people are not comfortable sharing their age, especially women. So, it’s better to have adab (etiquette) and stay clear of asking someone directly about their age. If you need to find out, for example, because you’re considering them for marriage, then you can be subtle about it. Try asking when and where they went to high school and what year they graduated. And if they’re on Facebook or MySpace, chances are they may have a lot of that information displayed on their profile page already.
  2. Weight: This is another topic that is especially private for women and some men, especially those who struggle with their weight.  Unless you are a physician and/or nurse, and need to find out for health reasons, please don’t ask.
  3. Marital Status: You may meet someone who is done with school and has been working for a while but don’t assume that because they are professionally established that they must also be married and possibly have children. And by all means NEVER ask someone who you think should be married but isn’t, “Why aren’t you married yet?” The fact is, there are many professional and highly successful Muslims who are having a real difficult time getting married. Many of them suffer severe depression because of it. So to attend a social event and be reminded by badgering questions from a complete stranger can often make them feel even worse and make them completely withdraw. You may also encounter someone who is married but is unhappy in their marriage or may be in the process of divorce, so to ask questions about their relationship status may make them feel uncomfortable. It’s better to stay clear of the whole topic and not assume anything about someone’s status and just wait for them or a third party to inform you about it instead.
  4. Income: The economy may be in shambles right now but there is no need to ask someone how much their salary is, especially someone you don’t know very well. This is a completely private topic and should only be discussed with trusted people including one’s close family members, lawyer, financial planner, or business partner. As Sidi Ahmad al-Zarruq advised, “Do not trust anyone with matters related to your religion, your family, and your wealth until you have tested him at least a thousand times.”
  5. Pregnancy/Parenting Plans: This is yet another highly sensitive topic that should never be used as a conversation piece.  There are many couples who are dealing with infertility issues and the constant pressure from family, friends and community members to start a family can take a tremendous emotional toll on both the man and the woman.  Asking a newlywed couple is completely different than asking a couple who’ve been married for longer than a year.  Unless the couple is outspoken about not wanting any children or if they are putting off parenting for a later time, it’s best to not bring up the issue, especially if they’ve been married for more than 3 years.  And if you notice a woman who may have put on some extra weight around the mid-section by all means never congratulate her prematurely and ask how far along she is. This can be an unfortunate blunder in which there really is no graceful way to get out of!
  6. Relationship Details: It is unequivocally forbidden in Islam to ask someone for personal or intimate details about their marital relationship. Women are more apt to do this, especially with their sisters or “best friends.” It may be a normal practice in this society, especially with the popularity of movies like “Sex & the City,” where talking about sex is seen as part and parcel of the female bonding experience, but it is completely haram in Islam. The Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) prohibited the man and the woman to talk to others about details that happen in their bedrooms. He said: ‘Do not do this. Do you know the similitude of those who do that? They are like a male and female devil who meet each other in the road and satisfy their desire with the people gazing at them.”
  7. Past Indiscretions: It is equally impermissible to ask someone about their past sins. Converts are especially victim to this type of incessant and unnecessary probing. It may be because it’s exciting to hear the contrast of where a person was before and prior to accepting Islam. Important and inspirational figures like Malcolm X and other notable converts to Islam often have very colorful pasts that make their conversion stories even more compelling.  The problem, however, is that Islam is a religion based on modesty, humility, and a sense of shame and guilt before God. To speak casually about one’s past indiscretions, regardless of how big or small and no matter where one is now, goes against the basic principles of haya` (modesty).  About this, the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) said: “O assembly of those who have believed with their tongues, but into whose hearts faith has not yet reached! Do not backbite the Muslims, nor seek out their secrets! For, whoever seeks out the faults of his brother, Allah will seek out his secrets. And, whoever has his secrets sought out by Allah, Allah will disgrace him, even [if he hides] in the depths of his house” (Abu Dawud). Another tradition follows, “My entire nation is safe, except al-Mujahirin (those who boast of their sins). Among the Mujaharah is that a man commits an (evil) act, and wakes up in the morning while Allah has kept his (sin) a secret, he says: “O so-and-so! Last night I did this and that.” He goes to sleep while Allah has kept his (sin) a secret but he wakes up in the morning and uncovers what Allah has kept a secret!” (Bukhari)
  8. Religious Practice (or lack thereof): It’s important to also mind your own business when it comes to another person’s spiritual or religious practice. If you come across someone who is outwardly negligent in a specific matter it is not something that you have a right to interrogate them about, for you have no knowledge of their inward reality–that is knowledge that is God’s alone.  So whether one wears the headscarf or decides to take it off, you do not have the right to judge them, criticize them or speak unfavorably about them to others. If you are sincere in your concern for them then you can advise them with compassion and love, privately, and certainly not in front of others.

It may seem that the list above leaves little to actually talk about, but there are plenty of other perfectly acceptable topics to start a conversation with like books, hobbies, traveling, etc. As we’re reminded in the Quran and hadith time and time again, we should avoid idle talk which is useless conversation with little or no benefit, “The believers are successful, who in their prayer have khushu (awe of God) and those who refrain from vain talk…” (Qur’an 23:1-3)

We should also try to be more original, sincere, and genuine in how we interact with people. If we always default to the same exact one-liners, starters and/or soundbites to engage someone then we’re carrying on very scripted conversations that lack originality and thought. We may not intend to but we’re actually treating people as soundboards rather than individuals. We should pay close and careful attention to each and every single person we interact with, observe them with great consideration and acknowledge what makes them unique. This is the perfect way of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) who treated every single person with the utmost consideration and care.  He honored people and made them feel important. By being more mindful of how we behave socially, knowing our limitations, and making more of an effort to treat people as individuals we honor his perfect way as it deserves to be honored.

Video: Ramadan with the Beloved of Allah. 02. Gentleness & Wisdom of the Prophet Muhammad – YouTube

YouTube – Ramadan with the Beloved of Allah. 02. Gentleness & Wisdom of the Prophet Muhammad

Episode 02 of Ramadan with the Beloved Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him). Shaykh Faraz Rabbani explains the gentleness, restraint, and wisdom of the Prophet Muhammad (Allah bless him and give him peace), as highlighted with his dealings with Anas ibn Malik (Allah be pleased with him), who served him for ten years… Taken from Imam Baghawi’s work, al-Anwar fi Shama’il al-Nabi al-Mukhtar.

 

The first video:

Ramadan with the Beloved of Allah. 01. The Beauty of the Messenger in Appearance & Character

Related SeekersGuidance Blog items:

Why Is the Prophet’s Character Described as Being Tremendous? – Faraz Rabbani

SeekersGuidance IslamCasts related to Prophetic Character:

Prophetic Conduct

Steps in the Path of Love of the Prophet

Don’t miss this: “The Complete Guide to Fasting” by Ustadha Naielah Ackbarali

In the Name of Allah, the Benevolent, the Merciful

Ramadan Mubarak. Don’t miss the excellent “Complete Guide to Fasting” by Ustadha Naielah Ackbarali, at the SeekersGuidance Answers service.

And Allah alone gives success.

Faraz Rabbani

Prophetic Guidance on Fasting & the Month of Ramadan – Riyad al-Salihin (Gardens of the Righteous) by Imam Nawawi

riyad6 – Chapters on Fasting (tr. Ayesha Bewley

217. Chapter: On the obligation to fast Ramadan and clarification of the excellence of fasting and what is connected to it

Allah Almighty says, “You who believe! Fasting is prescribed for you, as it was prescribed for those before you..” to His words “The month of Ramadan is the one in which the Qur’an was sent down as guidance for mankind, with Clear Signs containing guidance and discrimination. Any of you who are resident for the month should fast it. But any of you who are ill or on a journey should fast a number of other days.” (W2:182-184; H2:183-185)

1215. Abu Hurayra reported that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “Allah, the Mighty and Exalted said, ‘Every action of the son of Adam is for himself except for fasting. It is Mine and I repay it.’ Fasting is a shield. When someone is fasting, he should not have sexual relations nor quarrel. If someone fights him or insults him, he should say, ‘I am fasting’. By the One in whose hand the self of Muhammad is, the changed breath in the mouth of the faster is more fragrant to Allah than the scent of musk. The faster experiences two joys: when he breaks his fast he rejoices and when he meets his Lord he rejoices in his fasting.” [Agreed upon]

In one variant of al-Bukhari, “He has left his food and drink and appetites for My sake. Fasting is Mine and I repay it. Any other good deed I repay with ten like it.”

In a variant of Muslim, “Every action of the son of Adam is multiplied. A good action receives from ten to seven hundred times. Allah Almighty said, “Fasting is Mine and I repay it. He leaves his appetites and food for My sake. The faster experiences two joys: a joy when he breaks his fast and a joy when he meets his Lord. The changed breath in the mouth of the faster is more fragrant to Allah than the scent of musk.”

1216. Abu Hurayra reported that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “The one who spends out two kinds of actions in the way of Allah will be summoned from the gates of the Garden and told, ‘O slave of Allah this is better.’ All the people who did the prayer will be called from the gate of the prayer. All the people who did jihad will be called from the gate of jihad. All the people who fasted will be called from the gate of Rayyan. All the people who gave sadaqa will be called from the gate of sadaqa.” Abu Bakr said, “May my father and mother be sacrificed for you, Messenger of Allah. No one called from those gates will feel distress. Will anyone be called from all those gates?” He said, “Yes, and I hope that you will be among them.” [Agreed upon]

1217. Sahl ibn Sa’d reported that the Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “There is a gate in the Garden called ar-Rayyan which those who fast will enter on the Day of Rising, and none but they will enter it.” It will be said, ‘Where are the fasters?’ They will stand up and none but they will enter it. When they have entered it, it will be closed and no one else will enter it.” [Agreed upon]

1218. Abu Sa’id al-Khudri reported that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “No slave fasts one day in the way of Allah without Allah putting his face seventy years’ journey away from the Fire on account of that day.” [Agreed upon]

1219. Abu Hurayra reported that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “Anyone who prays in Ramadan motivated by belief and in expectation of the reward will be forgiven his past wrong actions.” [Agreed upon]

1220. Abu Hurayra reported that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “When Ramadan comes, the gates of the Garden are opened, the gates of the Fire are closed and the shaytans are chained up.” [Agreed upon]

1221. Abu Hurayra reported that the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “Fast when you see it (the new moon) and break the fast when you see it. If it is cloudy, then make Sha’ban complete with thirty days.” [Agreed upon]

In the variant of Muslim, “If it is cloudy, you must fast thirty days.”

218. Chapter: On generosity, charity and doing much good in the month of Ramadan, and increasing that in the last ten days of the month

1222. Ibn ‘Abbas said, “The Prophet, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, was the most generous of people, and he was even more generous during Ramadan when Jibril met him. Jibril used to meet him every night in Ramadan until it was over and the Prophet would go through the Qur’an with him. The Messenger of Allah was more generous with good things than the blowing wind.” [Agreed upon]

1223. ‘A’isha said, “When the last ten days of Ramadan started, the Messenger of Allah, may Allah bless him and grant him peace, used to pray during the night, wake up his family and intensify his efforts.” [Agreed upon]

Read more

Mawlana Rumi on fasting – Bradford Muslim

Bradford Muslim: Rumi on fasting

There’s hidden sweetness in the stomach’s emptiness.

We are lutes, no more, no less.

If the soundboxes stuffed full of anything, no music.

If the brain and belly are burning clean with fasting,

every moment a new song comes out of the fire.

The fog clears, and new energy makes you run

up the steps in front of you.

Be emptier and cry like reed instruments cry.

Emptier, write secrets with the reed pen.

When you’re full of food and drink,

Satan sits where your spirit should,

an ugly metal statue in place of the Kaaba.

When you fast, good habits gather

like friends who want to help.

Fasting is Solomon’s ring.

Don’t give into some illusion and lose your power,

but even if you have, if you’ve lost all will and control,

they come back when you fast,

like soldiers appearing out of the ground,

pennants flying above them.

A table descends to your tents, Jesus’ table.

Expect to see it, when you fast,

this table spread with other food,

better than the broth of cabbages.

Konya.jpg

Video: Ramadan with the Beloved of Allah. 01. The Beauty of the Messenger in Appearance & Character

YouTube – Ramadan with the Beloved of Allah. 01. The Beauty of the Messenger in Appearance & Character

Episode 01 of Ramadan with the Beloved of Allah. Shaykh Faraz Rabbani explains the Beauty of the Messenger in Appearance & Character, as leading Companions of the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) described. Taken from Imam Baghawi’s work, al-Anwar fi Shama’il al-Nabi al-Mukhtar.

Calligraphy - Name of Prophet Muhammad - Beautiful.jpg

Fahad Faruqui: Ramadan: Raising Spiritual and Financial Stocks?

Fahad Faruqui: Ramadan: Raising Spiritual and Financial Stocks?

Stock returns are nine times greater during Ramadan than the rest of the year, a recent study says. While I knew about the rise in spiritual stock and inner revolution that can result from abstinence and purification of the soul, the upside to a financial portfolio was news to me. It’s an intriguing way to balance faith and worldly affairs — it seems fasting pays dividends of all kinds.

“Ramadan is part of the Muslim culture of resistance to the mindless consumerism of our time,” Abdal Hakim Murad, a Muslim scholar and lecturer at Cambridge University, wrote to me in response to my question about the true meaning of Ramadan. “Only by a tough discipline of self-control can we learn detachment, thus experiencing inner calm, and challenge the ideology of greed which is threatening the planet.”

This got me thinking. In addition to causing stock rallies, Ramadan is mostly a month of internal battle against the desires of flesh. For me, abstaining from my usual dose of morning coffee is one of the many challenges I face. Fasting is not as simple as not eating and drinking from dawn to dusk — the practice helps break away from the enslavement of habit-forming vices.

Strengthening the will to abstain from what’s lawful during the month of Ramadan can be a precursor to being steadfast in refraining from what’s forbidden throughout the year. The effect of fasting on mind and soul varies, and it depends on one’s sense of purpose. A prominent scholar of Islam, Faraz Rabbani, made an interesting observation: “Some fast for God. Some fast because it is good. Others fast for the joy of breaking their fast. (Then, they indulge…).”

Read more: Fahad Faruqui: Ramadan: Raising Spiritual and Financial Stocks? (Huffington Post)

Recite or Listen to the Entire Qur’an in Ramadan – Tanzil.info

Tanzil : Quran Navigator

http://tanzil.info/quran/img/tanzil-3.png

It is praiseworthy to recite the entire Qur’an in the month of Ramadan. This high virtue is also attained by listening to the Qur’an. (Or by doing a mix of recitation and listening.) A very useful site to to recite or listen to the Qur’an–and also to follow along in translation is Tanzil : Quran Navigator (http://tanzil.info).

Make a commitment and practical plan to complete the Qur’an this Ramadan, and you’ll find benefit and blessing in your life and religion.

See: Tanzil : Quran Navigator

And Allah alone gives success.

Faraz Rabbani

Help our brethren in distress: Pakistan floods: ‘We are now in God’s hands’

Pakistan floods: ‘We are now in God’s hands’ | World news | The Guardian
Habiba in Sukkur, Pakistan
Habiba arrived in Sukkur in the early hours of the morning, after travelling nonstop for three days to find somewhere that had not been washed away by the floods. She left her village, Marakh Bijarani 40 miles away in Kashmore district, with 60 neighbours and relatives packed on to one tractor and trailer, with a few clothes, cooking pots and bedding piled underneath them.

Only half the village managed to escape – those who had taken refuge on the raised bank of a dyke at the moment when the water suddenly rushed in. Habiba made it out with two young children, but she has no idea what happened to her husband and five other children….

Read More: Pakistan floods: ‘We are now in God’s hands’ (The Guardian)

Do something: Donate and encourage your friends, family, contacts, and community to donate: Islamic Relief Pakistan Flood Emergency Fund