Are Extended Warranties Permissible?

Question: I recently got a laptop and I read online that purchasing an extended warranty at the same time at an additional cost is permissible because that extended service comes as a gift or servicing cost. After this, I got an extended warranty with a laptop, but I noticed that the warranty provided is not by the same company that provides the initial warranty that is a company of laptop like Dell, Apple, etc. (not the extended one). The extended warranty is by a third party.  Is this permissible?

Answer:

Wa ‘alaykum assalam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh,

I pray you are well.

Extended Warranties Are Permissible

Yes, purchasing such extended warranties are permissible if purchased at the time of the sale. The fact that the provider is another company does not affect the validity of the contract. The seller can be seen as a representative of the company who will provide the service to you (Usmani, Fiqh al Buyu’).

Please consider taking our course on Money Matters. It will provide a lot of guidance on money and the principles of Islamic Finance.

May Allah grant you the best of both worlds.

[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim

 

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 where, for 18 months, he studied with many erudite scholars. In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years in Sacred Law (fiqh), legal theory (Usul al-fiqh), theology, hadith methodology, hadith commentary, and Logic. He was also given licenses of mastery in the science of Quranic recital and he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Quranic sciences, tafsir, Arabic grammar, and Arabic eloquence.

Marrying a Non-Muslim Interested in Islam

Question: I am 23 years old and am interested in marrying a non-Muslim who is currently studying to convert to Islam. My mother is however against it and I am not sure what to do. My father does not have objections but he is non-Muslim. Can I marry without my mother and with my father as my Wali even though he is non-Muslim?

Answer:

Assalamu alaykum

Thank you for your question. I am assuming that you are a female, and as such, you do not need the permission of your mother nor your non-Muslim father to marry (even if you are male, you don’t need their permission). In addition, it would be invalid for your father to be a wali because he is not Muslim.

To have or not to have a wali

I don’t recommend that you take this route of doing it alone, so it would be wise of you to seek out a Muslim elder, relative, or imam to be your wali. It is recommended (and in some schools, obligatory) for a Muslim girl to have wali in order to conduct her marriage, but not obligatory in the Hanafi school as you will see in the links below. This provides some ease for converts. Please see a local, reliable, imam for his suggestions about your nikah:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/i-need-help-finding-a-wali/

Istikhara

Istikhara is the first step to making any big decision like marriage. Have you prayed it yet? Did you follow the etiquette of praying istikhara? Please see these links for full information on it, and be sure to have done your istikhara and let that be the foundation of your decision to marry this would-be convert. If you find that your istikhara comes out negative, you must be prepared to walk away from this and consider that your mother might have been right.
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/istikhara-the-prayer-of-seeking-guidance/
https://seekersguidance.org/articles/general-artices/the-reality-of-istikhara/

Your mother

Try to communicate openly with your mother that you feel this is the right person for you. Tell her that you have prayed istikhara and that you will not marry him if he does not convert, as that would be sinful and invalid (if you are female). Assure her that this will not dissuade you from your religion or make you a worse Muslim. Be open, kind, polite, understanding, and never get angry. Let them spend some time together so that your mother can see his good character and qualities. Give your mother time to accept and get used to the idea, but do let her know that you plan to marry him and that you need and want her support.

Learn and prepare before you marry

I commend you for being Muslim, seeing that your father is not Muslim and I advise that you and your suitor take a course on marriage before you tie the knot. It is incumbent that you both learn your rights and obligations and about the spirit of an Islamic marriage.
https://seekersguidance.org/courses/marriage-in-islam-practical-guidance-for-successful-marriage/
Also, see this link for more articles and resources:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/marriage-in-islam-a-reader/

May Allah make it easy for your mother to accept this suitor, may his conversion be blessed, may both of your parents rejoice in your union, and may Allah bless the marriage.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

 

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

My Non-Muslim Parents Want Me To Marry a Non-Muslim

Learn a Short Surah

Question: Idolatrous parents don’t approve of their daughter’s marriage because her suitor doesn’t believe in idol worship. Instead, they want her to marry an idol-worshipper. She does not currently believe in idol worship and believes firmly in Almighty God. What should she do in light of the Quran and hadith?

Answer:

Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for your question.  This must be a difficult time for you since your beliefs are very different from your parents’ beliefs. I pray that you can reconcile with them with ease and good character without undue pain and hardship to either party.

Marrying a non-Muslim man

Please see this answer about why a Muslim woman cannot marry a non-Muslim man, there is simply no room for it in the shari`ah and there is unanimous consensus about its impermissibility.
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/muslim-woman-not-allowed-marry-non-muslim-man/

Non-Muslim father to act as a legal guardian

If your parents are non-Muslim, while you are Muslim, your father may not act as your guardian for your marriage contract. In such a situation, you would ask an imam or other reliable legal upright Muslim man to act on his behalf.

In addition, you would not need his permission to marry the man of your choice. Please see these links:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/i-am-a-convert-and-ready-to-marry/
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/how-to-overcome-the-hardships-of-getting-married-as-an-hidden-convert/

Family and Wisdom

With the understanding of the above rulings, you should proceed with love, tact, and wisdom. Your parents brought you into this world and they should be involved in attending the wedding and being informed every step of the way. Explain to them gently that what they want from you is not possible.

Respect their views and hear their advice, even if you disagree and will not act upon it. Tell them that you appreciate any marital advice that they can offer after the marriage has taken place and that you hope and expect that they will be active participants in your children’s lives.

Du`a

Ask Allah after your daily prayers and during the last third of the night to facilitate this matter and that your parents be patient and accept your differences. It may take time, but I am certain that they will continue to love you and respect your choices in life. Read some Qu’ran every day with the meaning and learn your obligations in your daily Islamic practice and as a Muslim wife.

Consider taking these free courses:
https://seekersguidance.org/courses/marriage-in-islam-practical-guidance-for-successful-marriage/
https://seekersguidance.org/courses/introduction-to-islam-what-it-means-to-be-muslim/

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

 A Moment of Silence

Is Religion Relevant in the 21st Century

Question: Is it permissible to observe a moment of silence to remember an event or the death of certain individuals?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

Observing a moment of silence has no basis in the Sunna of the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him). That said, it is also not a religious ritual, but rather a convention (adah) so it does not count as an accretion to the religion (bida) and would be permissible to do.

It would however be better to avoid unless there is overwhelming pressure to do it.

So, if you are part of a large organization in which your own actions are less noticeable, it would be better not to do observe the moment of silence.

However, if you are part of a smaller unit, such as a family or small business, in which one’s own individual actions would make or break one’s relationship with the others, one should observe the moment of silence. This is especially the case when the event has great emotional or political weight.

Now, this is obviously on the proviso that one is not showing this respect to a person of sin out of reverence for his sin, or a disbeliever out of reverence for his disbelief.

For example, having a moment of silence for Abu Jahl out of respect for his practicing his freedom of religion, or having a moment of silence to remember some famous brewer’s contribution to the science of brewing beer. These of course would be sinful.

In such a case, you would have to either take a very clear and calculated stance and convey to others why exactly you feel it is morally wrong to observe a moment of silence for such a person or avoid the situation completely in an allusive manner.

In general, we as Muslims need to be more clear and communicative, not loud and angry. We need to be sensitive and have hearts, but at the same time have our own identities and moral values.

Please also see:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/clarifying-innovations-in-islam/
https://seekersguidance.org/courses/evaluating-innovations-debunking-ten-bidah-myths/
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/the-concept-and-classification-of-bida-in-islam/

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Meeting With a Prospective Bride

Question: If there is someone who I seriously consider as a prospective bride, can I meet her in a cafe or something like that?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

When one finds someone who generally seems like a suitable match, one should reach out to the family first. If they are willing, one could meet the prospective bride in a cafe or walk with her in a park providing there is a religious chaperone who would notice if there was hand-holding or anything like that.

As for meeting her alone, or among the bad company, that would not be permissible because for most people it leads to sin.

The Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) said, ‘It really is the case that no man and woman alone save that the third person with them is the Devil’ (Ahmad and Tirmidhi).

Please see:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/a-reader-on-gender-interaction/
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/can-remove-face-veil-front-prospective-spouse/
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/is-one-allowed-to-chat-with-a-potential-spouse-for-the-purpose-of-getting-to-know-each-other/

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Responsibilities of an Muslim Chaplain in a University

Question: What are the responsibilities of an Imam or a Muslim Chaplain in a non-Muslim university with a growing population of Muslim students?

Answer: 

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

The general responsibilities include leading ritual prayers, giving general Islamic advice to students, and helping Muslim students find answers to their questions from reliable sources.

On a deeper level, a chaplain is to give spiritual advice on interpersonal relations and help Muslim students navigate their studies and careers in an Islamic way.

The chaplain also must help the Muslims carve out a separate yet balanced Muslim identity that is welcoming and that provides a clear safe haven for students that struggle to find themselves and their Islamic identity in a tempest of ideas and social pressures.

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid Dingle

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Changing One’s Appearance

 

Question: Is it permissible to use subliminal to change one’s physical appearance?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

Firstly, whether or not subliminal works on a physical level is something that the scientific community agrees on, further research should still be done on it to ascertain whether or not it is just quackery.

That said, assuming that they could actually achieve a change in one’s physical body by using subliminal, it would not be permissible because it ultimately results in changing the body without any medical reason.

Please see:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/is-cosmetic-surgery-allowed/

Anyone who is deeply unhappy with the way they look, despite the fact that they do not have any defects, should work on their inner sense of contentment and gratitude with Allah. If you are continually trying to resort to plastic surgery or any other way of changing your appearance, and it is clearly becoming an obsession, then you should consider going to a psychiatrist.

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Giving Salams to Non-Mahrams

Turning Back to Allah

Question: What are the rules and practices around a woman giving salaams to a non-mahram man? I have been told conflicting information: one side says to give salams to all Muslims and the other says that, as a woman, I’m only to greet women and unmarriageable (mahram) men.

Answer:

Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for your question.

The ruling

It says in the Reliance of the Traveller,

“r33.1 (Nahlawi:) It is offensive (def: r32.0) to greet with “as-Salamu ‘alaykum” anyone who is: (…) (8) a young lady who is not a member of one’s unmarriageable kin (dis: r32.6); [pp. 768-769].

Ustadh Abdullah Misra mentions, “A young un-related woman and a man do not have to reply to the other’s salams out loud (many scholars say they actually shouldn’t salam in the first place if they are only addressing each other without necessity, as a way to prevent unnecessary interaction).

Using wisdom

According to the above, we can see that a man or woman should not be greeting the opposite gender if they are not related to them. However, if one feels that a relationship with, say, a cousin, or a brother-in-law, will be strained, or worse, that this will push them away from Islam, one may use tact and wisdom to determine whether one should greet them or return their greeting aloud. Generally speaking, politeness, affability, and kindness was the approach of the Prophet, may Allah bless him and give him peace. May we all follow his great example and take him as our ultimate role model.

Please see this excellent article about all the etiquettes, rulings, and habits concerning the salam:
https://seekersguidance.org/articles/prophetic-guidance/forgotten-sunnas-greetings-peace/

May Allah give you the best in this world and the next.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Working Within Non-Islamic Law

What You Need To Know About Standing Rock

Question: Is it permissible to work as a judge, lawyer, or attorney within the framework of a non-Islamic Law?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

The default assumption is that one only enforce and defend the Sacred law that Allah has prescribed for all mankind.

Allah Most High says, ‘And so judge between them by what Allah has revealed’ (Qur’an, 5: 49).

And He Most High says,

‘And whoever does not judge by that which Allah has revealed, such are the wrongdoers’ (Qur’an, 5: 45).

Litigating for, or issuing a court ruling for a right or penalty that has no possible place in the Qur’an and Sunna is sinful. On the other hand, working within a non-Islamic legal system to achieve something that does fit within the wide and varied understandings of the Qur’an and Sunna is permissible. So, as long as the sphere of law is not in clear contradiction with the Sacred Law, and as long as the specific ruling/right is not in clear contradiction with the Sacred Law it is permissible to work as a judge or lawyer.

For any unclear scenarios, one must ask a qualified mufti whether or not one may issue a certain court ruling or litigate for any particular right or court decision.

Please see:
https://islamqa.org/hanafi/qibla-hanafi/43679

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Interest-bearing Loan on Wife’s Name

Question: If a husband takes debts on the wife’s bank account, will she be the one who is in debt in front of Allah? He did not even tell her about it first. How should a wife deal with such behavior? The husband cannot pay back the money as quickly as he thinks and there are letters coming in that she has to make payments. This situation is very stressful for her because of usury.

Answer:

Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for your question. I am sorry that you have to go through this situation and I understand your frustration at your husband’s actions. It is wrong, and unmanly to treat a woman like this and to be comfortable with going at war with Allah over usury.

Are you responsible?

I don’t understand how your husband was able to take a loan out in your name without your signature? Perhaps this is possible in a shared account, but in light of his actions, I would recommend that you keep your money in a separate account under your name alone.

As for your responsibility, if he did this without your knowledge, how could you be responsible? However, now that you are both involved, as the bank could come after you, too, I would do my utmost to put everything towards your debt and live frugally until you are able to pay it off. Remove the sin as quickly as you can because it will affect your family life and you may be devoid of blessings in your day to day life. See this expert’s advice for getting out of debt.
https://funcheaporfree.com/how-to-get-out-of-debt-in-3-simple-steps/

Stress

As it is, you are stuck in a situation and I don’t want you to get stressed about it. You can do your best to help your husband, and budget well, but you are not responsible to pay this debt yourself. Remember to see every problem that you have, as sent to you by Allah as a test. You must try to have the right reaction and trust in Him. Ask him to guide you to the best way to get out of this and strive to fulfill your other obligations to Him. Spend time learning your religion, involve your husband as well, and take time to de-stress. Spend time in nature, take your supplements, exercise, and push away thoughts that won’t help you. Make a plan and follow it step-by-step.

Resources

Please learn this du’a about debt and say it daily:
https://seekersguidance.org/podcast-feeds/prophetic-character/prophetic-cure-worry-debt/

Please listen to this series on debt and try to have your husband listen to it with you:
https://dev.seekersguidance.org/articles/general-artices/debt-destroys-lives-rizqwise/

The absolute best advice that I can give you to deal with your husband’s bold behavior is here in this article about usury:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/am-i-sinful-to-live-with-a-husband-who-is-not-concerned-with-avoiding-usury/

May Allah give you the best in this world and the next and facilitate your getting out of this situation, soon.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.