Valid Make Up Fasts

Ustadh Farid Dingle clarifies the rulings on making up fasts, intentions and actions, and reward from Allah, according to the Shafi‘i madhhab.

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I became Muslim during the month of Ramadan 2012. When I became Muslim I was not told to fast so out of ignorance I didn’t fast that Ramadan. As time went on and I began to learn more I realized I had to make these days up. At the time I decided to start making them up I was under the impression that I had to fast 2 consecutive months for each day missed. When I started to study (Shafi‘i) fiqh I found this to be incorrect. I had already fasted about a month consecutively before I found out the ruling and stopped, would this time I fasted count at all towards my make ups? Or is it invalid because the ruling wasn’t carried out correctly? Please advise.

Jazak Allah khayr

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

In the Shafi‘i school, that wouldn’t count because the intention was to expiate and not to make-up the fast. This is because of the hadith, ‘Actions are only by intentions.’ [Bukhari and Muslim]

That said, you would get the reward for fasting a whole month regardless, even if it didn’t technically count as the obligatory fasts. Allah Most High says, ‘So He answered them saying, ‘Never will I allow to be lost the work of [any] worker among you, whether male or female.’ [3:195]

So, just work out exactly how many days of Ramadan 2012 you have to make them up, and just make them up before this coming Ramadan, even if not consecutively. Try to get them done soon as the days are still short, which makes it much easier.

I pray this helps.

Farid

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


 

What Should I Do After Fasting During Menstruation? (Habib Umar)

Answered by  Habib Umar bin Hafiz

Question: Assalam aleykum

A 14-year-old girl menstruated during the past Ramadan without performing the purificatory bath. She fasted Ramadan not realizing that it was a menstrual period. Upon realization, is she required to make up the fast?

Answer: [Assalam alaykum]

If she did not perform the purificatory bath after her menstrual period had ended, then the prayers she performed before having performed a purificatory bath would be invalid. Thus, prayers that were performed between the end of her menstrual period and the purificatory bath would need to be made up, since she prayed without being in a state of ritual purity.

As for her fasting, if she fasted during her menstrual period, it would be invalid and would need to be made up. However, if she fasted while not menstruating, such fasting would remain valid, despite being in a state of ritual impurity for not having yet performed the purificatory bath. This is because the purificatory bath is not a condition for fasting. Fasting becomes obligatory merely once the menstrual period ends.

This serves as a reminder for our shortcoming when it comes to the obligation of female education. On a related note, many girls become legally responsible through menstruation. For example, they may be 13 or 14 years old, not perform the fast, and not be instructed by their family to do so. She would thus be sinful and so would her father.

There are also instances where, after marrying, she would mention such a case to her husband. After several years, she may remark that she reached puberty before the age of 15, though she did not fast her first or second months of Ramadan. This is all an immense shortcoming in female education and the exaltation of the Sacred Law within our hearts. We should therefore be attentive to this and likewise bring it our girls’ attention. It would be more appropriate for the mother to do so, as she would better relate to girls.

If the girl has her menstrual period beginning at age nine, which now occurs more frequently due to certain foods and viewing certain scenes, the mother should approach and speak with her, introducing to her the issues relating to menstruation, such as:

i) what becomes obligatory
ii) the requirement of the purificatory bath
iii) her reaching puberty
iv) the obligation of fasting once her menstrual period ends
v) teacher her how to perform a proper, valid purificatory bath with a proper, valid intention

These are all important obligations. May Allah enable us to perform them.

Translated by Mahmoud Hamed

Habib Umar bin Hafiz  is a descendant of the Prophet (upon him be Allah’s peace and blessings). Born into a family of scholars, Habib Umar, pursued the sacred sciences from a young age, including Quran, Hadith, Fiqh, ‘Aqeedah, Arabic, and Spirituality. In 1994, he established Dar al-Mustafa, an educational institute in Tarim, Yemem.

Link to the original answer

What Should I Do After Not Fasting Because of Sport in School?

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Last year the sport at school was running. And it was during Ramadan. On the 1st day, I tried to hold but I didn’t succeed, I felt unwell. So I drank water. I imagine it’s a valid justification. But the next week, we also had the same thing. But this time I have not waited for a discomfort, I did not fast this day. I do not know if it’s justified. I have it already catch up.

1) Do I have to pay a fidya?

2) Can we pay in cash or is it mandatory that it be food?

Ramadan became mandatory for me 2 years ago. I know I’ve caught up with my days but I don’t know if I did everything. So I decided to catch up, regardless of the days I caught before because I do not remember. So I am fasting 11 days.

Do I have to pay a fidya?

Answer: Wa’alaykum assalam. Jazakum Allah khayr for writing in. I pray you’re well. May Allah reward you for trying to make amends with your fasts.

Fasts that have been missed or broken, whether for a valid excuse or not, must be made up. If one did not fast or nullified the fast without a valid excuse, then an expiation must be offered as well (fidia).

Breaking fasts

In order to break one’s fast, one must have a valid reason, such as severe sickness, or where a dispensation is available, such as travel.

Generally speaking, physical education, sports competitions, exams, work etc. are not considered valid reasons to not fast in Ramadan. Neither is it valid to not fast all together due to such considerations, before a valid exemption presents itself. However, if one did perform the sports, exams, work etc. while fasting and as a result became very sick and fasting will increase the sickness, then this sickness could be considered a valid excuse, but the sickness must be significant, not mild.

In most cases, schools will permit students to be exempt from sports lessons due to fasting, and this options should be explored prior to Ramadan.

Valid reasons for not fasting are many and can be found in the books of fiqh. I recommend taking one of our Shafi’i fiqh courses or attending similar lessons locally.

Among the nullifiers of the fast are intentionally eating and drinking, even if the item eaten is extremely small, as well as intentionally swallowing food that was in between one’s teeth.

Certainty

One only has to make up those fasts one is sure that they broke their fast. If one is unsure, then the fast remains valid. However, one should perform extra days as make ups as a precautionary measure.

As such, you should calculate the days that you are certain that you did not fast or broke the fast without a valid excuse. Then, you should perform extra days make up / fidia out of precaution.

Fidia

As mentioned, if a fast is broken without a valid excuse, one must make up the fast and pay a fidia.

The Fidia expiation consists of one mudd of the main staple food of one’s area, such as rice, wheat, corn etc. This is a dry measure consisting of a medium handful, amounting to approximately 0.51 litres. Handful meaning two medium sized hands cupped together. The mudd(s) must be distributed to the poor and the needy.

If it is not possible to distribute the fidia locally, then a weaker opinion holds that it can be distributed abroad.

In our school, the fidia must be given as food. However, if this is not possible, there is no harm in following the Hanafi position which permits paying the monetary equivalent of the staple food.

It should also be noted that the reliable opinion in our school is that the fidia accumulates each year, so if one missed one day of fasting during Ramadan and did not make the expiation that year (before the next Ramadan), then they must pay 2 mudds for that same day in the second year, and so on. According to a valid second opinion within our school, the fidia does not accrue each year.

[Mughni al Muhtaj, Bushra al Karim]

I pray the above clarifies the issue for you insha’Allah.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Is Feeding Non-Muslims During the Day in Ramadan Permissible? (Shafi’i)

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Some scholars say that it is haram to give food to a non-Muslim who is morally responsible during the day in Ramadan. Others say that it is permissible to feed them during the day in Ramadan.

What is the position of the Shafi’i school on issue?

Answer: Assalam ‘alaykum. Jazakum Allah for your question.

Both answers quoted in the question are correct in their own way, one being more general than the other.

The Shafi’i Opinion

The opinion of the Shafi’i school is that it is impermissible to give food or sell food to a non-Muslim during the fasting day, as quoted in Ibn Hajr’s Tuhfa, Imam al Sharqawi’s Hashiyat al Tahrir, and Ba Fadl’s Bushra al Karim.

This ruling is based on the Shafi’i position that non-Muslims are legally responsible for both the obligation of accepting Islam and the agreed-upon details of the shariah (furu’), as mentioned by Imam Nawawi in his Sharh Sahih Muslim.

Therefore, in the Shafi’i school, if a Muslim feeds a non-Muslim during the day it is as if he is assisting the non-Muslim in sin.

Other Opinions

Other madhabs, such as the Hanafi school, hold that non-Muslims are not held accountable for the details of the Shariah, and therefore a Muslim feeding a non-Muslim during the fasting day of Ramadan does not amount to assisting them in sin, as they won’t be asked about it on the Day of Judgement.

Though I cannot be sure in what exact context Sayyid Habib ‘Umar intended his words, it appears that he was adopting a broader approach to the answer, not a madhab-specific answer, but rather a da’wah based approach grounded in using wisdom in a situation with a greater purpose in view, namely, guiding others to Islam. Note that Habib did not mention ‘the Shafi’i opinion’ in his answer.

Utilising a broader opinion from another school is a valid, and sometimes necessary approach in some circumstances. Adopting the strict position of one’s own school may not always be in the greater interest and benefit of the given situation.

This is fiqh in practice (tatbiq); sound knowledge translated into action with wisdom and contemplation. The application of which depends on time, place and people.

In summary, both answers are correct in their own way, the first is more madhab-specific, more text-based, while the second answer seems to be more general, da’wah focussed, and with practicality and wisdom as the guiding principles.

And Allah knows best.

I hope this clarifies things for you insha’Allah.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Am I Exempted From Fasting If I Have a Medical Condition? (Shafi’i)

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

If I have to take a medication twice a day, which dehydrates me, am I exempted from fasting?

Also, if we are afflicted with a mental health disorder, do we fall under those whom are exempted from fasting?

Answer: Wa‘alaykum assalam. Jazakum Allah khayr for your question. I pray this finds you in the best of states.

Physical and mental conditions can exempt one from fasting in Ramadan. However, due to the individuality of each case, you would need to consult a reliable local physician and scholar who is familiar with the details of your condition to fully assess if you would be exempted from fasting.

The general rulings which apply to persons on medication are that one should:

1. Discuss alternative posology schedules with your physician to see if it can be worked around the fasting day.

2. Discuss alternative medication or therapies which do not have the same side-effects, such as severe dehydration.

3. If it is established that one must take the medication during the fast, or the necessary medication produces side effects that make fasting too much of hardship, then one should see if they can make up the fasts during the shorter/colder days of the year. If that is not possible, but one recovers at a later point in time, then one would be obliged to make up the fasts then.

4. If there is no hope of recovery, and they are unable to ever make up the fasts in the year due to the condition, then they would not be obligated to make the fasts up, though they would have to pay a fidia. A fidia is an expiation, and consists of one mudd of the main staple food (a dry measure consisting of a medium handful, amounting to approximately 0.51 litres) of one’s locality. One mudd must be paid for each fast day missed.

[Bushra al Karim]

Please also refer to the following answer:

Long-Term Illness that Prevents Fasting

I wish you the best of health and iman.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Is It Permissible to Eat After the Adhan of Fajr If One Oversleeps? (Shafi’i)

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

If one wakes up just 5 mins after the fajr call to prayer but the sky is still dark, is it permissible to carry on eating till sunlight? Will that fast be valid?

Answer: Wa’alaykum assalam. Jazakum Allah khayr for your question.

The opinion of the Shafi’i madhab is that the time of suhur ends when Fajr time sets in, regardless if it is dark outside or not. I do not know of any opinion in our school, nor any opinion in any other madhab, that states that one is permitted to eat after Fajr time has definitely entered, even if they overslept. The same ruling can be found according to the Hanafi school here, and the Malik school here.

The Missed Day

Consequently, it would also be obligatory for such a person to abstain (Imsak) from all the things a fasting person must abstain from that day due to the sacredness of the fasting hours. After Ramadan, the person would have to make up that day as well as pay an expiation (fidia).

Expiation (Fidia)

Fidia consists of one mudd of the main staple food (a dry measure consisting of a medium handful, amounting to approximately 0.51 litres) of the place the person is in. One mudd must be paid for each day missed.

The mudd(s) must be distributed to the poor and the needy. It is permissible to give many mudds to one person, but not one mudd between two or more people.

[Tuhfa al Muhtaj, Iyanat al Talibin]

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

How Should I Perform the Ritual Bath After Homosexual Acts and During Ramadan?

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

1) Should a man inserting the tip of the penis in other man’s anus perform
a ghusl?

2) Is the ghusl obligatory even if both were wearing clothes?

3) Is this ghusl the same as the ghusl of janaba?

4) Is it valid to fast in a state of Janaba?

5) I have masturbated during Ramadan. Sometimes during the day, sometimes during the night. Should I make up the previous fasts before this ramadan?

6) Was I pure if I didn’t make an intention for previous Masturbation and wet dreams when performing the ghusl?

Answer: Assalam alaykum. Jazakum Allah khayran for your questions. May Allah reward for you striving to practice the religion.

Please find below the answers to your questions in numerical order:

1) For ghusl to be obligatory, the entire head of the penis must enter the orifice, anal or other. The tip of the penis does not obligate a ghusl.

2) If the entire head of the penis went in, regardless if between clothes, then ghusl is obligatory.

Dear brother, it goes without saying that the above sins are prohibited and among the major sins. If these acts have been performed, and if you haven’t already, I urge you to make repentance as soon as possible, and resolve never to return to them. May Allah guide you to every good.

3) Yes, both are the same.

4) The fasts are valid as it is not a condition of the fast that one is in a state of purity. One can still fast in a state of janabah.

5) Given what you have said, your fasts are valid except for the once that you broke it after suhur. You would need to make that day up and pay a fidia for the day, which repeats each year that passes without making the day up and paying the fidia.

Fidia consists of one mudd of the main staple food (a dry measure consisting of a medium handful, amounting to approximately 0.51 litres) of the place the person is in. One mudd must be paid for each day missed.

You should make sincere tawba for any past sins and practices, and be determined not to return to them again. Once done, move forward and observe Ramadan with energy and devotion.

6) As mentioned your fasts are valid except for that once. In regards the intention for taking the ghusl, in the Shafi’i school one must make the intention for it to be counted as a valid ghusl. it suffices that you simply know that you were taking the ghusl to lift the state of janaba. If you took ghusl for other reasons, such as hygiene, then the ghusls would not count, and therefore your prayers would not have been valid.

However, in the Hanafi school, the intention is not an integral of the ghusl. I suggest you read the description of the Hanafi position in the link below. If your ghusl fulfilled the conditions laid out in the answer then you may follow this opinion and consider your prayers valid. If your ghusls did not meet the Hanafi conditions, then your prayers would be invalid and need to made up:

The Ritual Bath (ghusl): Obligatory, Recommended, and Disliked Acts

May Allah make you firm in the faith and guide you to everything that is good.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Is the Fast of a Woman Not Wearing the Hijab (Veil) Valid? (Shafi’i)

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Is the fast of a woman not wearing the hijab (veil) valid?

Answer: Wa’alaykum assalam. Thank you for your question.

The legal validity of fasting isn’t conditioned on wearing the hijab, so one’s fast would be valid if one didn’t observe hijab during it.

For fasting to be accepted by God, one should try one’s utmost to observe all the general inward and outward obligations of the religion, as these make the act of fasting complete and more likely to be accepted.

Inward obligations mean staying away from backbiting, lying, anger and other such traits during fasts. Outward obligations mean praying the five compulsory prayers, lowering one’s gaze, and observing hijab. As mentioned, these are not conditions for the validity of fasting but complete the fast as an act of worship.

Specifically, Ramadan is a perfect time to renew our intentions and relationship with Allah. Many women who don’t usually wear the hijab do so in Ramadan out of reverence for the holy month. It is a good time to reflect on our faith and to continue with those things we observed in Ramadan throughout the rest of the year until they become habit.

May Allah increase you in every good and closeness to Him.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Can I Make up Fasts Even If My Parents Prevent Me From Doing So?

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I want to make up my fasts from previous years however I am only allowed by my parents to do so once a week. It causes my mother mental and emotional distress every time it comes up. Should I push it? Is this shirk in any way?

Answer:Wa’alaykum assalam. Thank you for writing in. May Allah reward you greatly for making up your missed fasts.

Making up obligatory acts of worship

The scholars state that worship missed for a valid excuse must be made up, but it is not obligatory to make them up immediately, though recommended. Worship missed without a valid excuse must be made up immediately. [Bushra al Karim]

‘Immediately’ means spending all one’s time and efforts to make them up, other than the necessary aspects of life such as eating, sleeping, working etc. In practical terms however, the most realistic way to make up worship is to estimate the amount that one can maintain and continue on it, increasing when possible.

Obeying parents

The general rule in regards to obeying parents is that one does not have to obey them when they forbid one from performing obligatory acts or confirmed sunnas, in the same way one does not listen to them if they order one to do something prohibited.

What is obligatory however, irrespective of what they are asking one to do or not do, is that one treats their parents with kindness and patience. You can find more information about obeying/disobeying parents here.

Wisdom and Practicalities

Given the above, the basic ruling is that you are not obliged to comply to your parents’ wishes that you only make up one fast a week. However, how you practically go about this must be coupled with wisdom, especially given your living conditions.

You’ve mentioned that there is no valid reason they are forbidding you to make up more fasts. However, there may be some fear there that they haven’t expressed, even if it is irrational.

Perhaps the best approach would be talk to them again (or get someone else to talk to them that they will listen to). Explain to them that it is of the utmost importance that you make these fasts up, and that as an adult you are obliged to make them up as soon as possible.

If they get very upset or distressed, or life at home becomes unbearable, then perhaps try to reach a mutual agreement that will be more comfortable with them, such as increasing 2 days each week for example. If they are worried about your health, then assure them that you’ll take a rest if you show any signs being unwell.

Do your best to stick to your intentions as much as is possible, while showing your parents good character and an easy nature. Inshallah, over time they will accept your firmness and determination.

As for shirk, no, this doesn’t enter into your case.

May Allah make things easy for you, and grant you tawfiq in fulfilling your obligations to Him and your parents.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

What Is the Ruling Regarding the One Who Intentionally Breaks Their Fast During Ramadan? [Shafi’i]

Answered by  Habib Umar bin Hafiz

Question: Assalam aleykum

What is the ruling regarding the one who intentionally breaks their fast during Ramadan?

Answer: [Assalam alaykum]

Repentance for Omitting an Obligatory Fast

The one who intentionally and willfully breaks their fast during Ramadan is required to:

i) hasten in repentance to Allah, the Blessed and Exalted;

ii) to have remorse for what he has committed; and

iii) to make up what was missed, while feeling remorse.

There will never be any other remedy besides true remorse and returning to Allah. In fact, were one to fast his entire lifetime without remorse or repentance, this would not benefit him. Only true remorse, repentance, and turning to Allah, the Majestic will suffice him. It is imperative to immediately rectify one’s state, hasten in regret, repentance, and in making up what was missed.

Consequences of Omitting versus Denying the Obligation of the Fast

If such a person accepts the obligation of fasting during Ramadan, then such a person would have committed a grave sin. Their breaking the fast without a valid excuse was due to following their ego and lower desires, while still acknowledging the truth of the obligation. However, one who denies the obligation itself would thereby leave the fold of the Religion (and refuge is sought with Allah).

Such a person would be required to return immediately to the religion of truth and guidance, the religion of Islam. They should believe with certainty that Allah has made such fasting obligatory upon us through the Qur’an and His Messenger (may Allah’s peace and blessings be upon him and his folk). The Companions, Successors, and those who followed them with excellence were all in consensus regarding this.

Translated by Mahmoud Hamed

Habib Umar bin Hafiz  is a descendant of the Prophet (upon him be Allah’s peace and blessings). Born into a family of scholars, Habib Umar, pursued the sacred sciences from a young age, including Quran, Hadith, Fiqh, ‘Aqeedah, Arabic, and Spirituality. In 1994, he established Dar al-Mustafa, an educational institute in Tarim, Yemem.

Link to the original answer

ما حكم من أفطر متعمدا في رمضان؟
من أفطر متعمدا مختارا في رمضان فعليه أن يسرع بالتوبة إلى الله تبارك وتعالى، وأن يندم على ما كان منه، وأن يقضي ما فاته نادماً، فليس سوى صدق الندم والرجوع إلى الله من دواء له أبداً، وإنه لا يغني عنه لو صام العمر كله وهو غير نادمٍ وغير تائبٍ فلن يفيده ذلك، ولكن صدق ندمه وتوبته ورجوعه إلى ربِّه جلَّ جلاله، فينبغي أن يتدارك حاله وأن يسرع بالندم والتوبة وأن يقضي ما فات عليه.
ويكون مرتكباً للكبيرة مادام معتقداً وجوب صوم رمضان وإنما تعمد الفِطر بغير عذر إتباعاً للنفس وللهوى مع إقراره بفرضيته، أما مَنْ أنكر فرضيته، فبإنكاره للفرضية يخرج من الملة والعياذ بالله، ويجب عليه أن يعود سريعاً إلى دائرة ملة الحق والهدى ملة الإسلام، ويوقن بأن الله فرض علينا هذا الصيام بالقرآن وعلى لسان رسوله، وقد أجمع على ذلك الصحابة والتابعون وتابعوهم بإحسان.