Company Shares

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: My company has offered me the option to buy company shares. The share price is substantial, so they offer a loan but it is not interest-free. The company will pay the interest portion, and I will have to pay the principal amount of the loan. Is this transaction legal in our deen?

Answer: wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh.

I pray you are well.

This transaction is impermissible. It’s better that you get an interest-free loan from another source if you wish to make this investment.

Being Far from Allah’s Mercy

The Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace, cursed the one who takes interest, the one who gives it, the one who documents the transaction, and the one who is a witness to that transaction; he said, “They are all equal [in sin].” (Muslim) This is a serious matter.

A curse (la’na) is a plea to Allah to distance someone from His mercy. Imagine a time when you are desperately in need of Allah’s mercy, whether in this life or the next, and it doesn’t show? How dire would that situation be?

Find an alternative, pray the istikhara prayer, and pursue it in a halal manner if you feel it is for your ultimate benefit. Otherwise, run a mile, lest Allah’s mercy is even further away from you at your hour of need.

May Allay grant you the best of both worlds.

[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 where, for 18 months, he studied with erudite scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish, and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish. In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years in Sacred Law (fiqh), legal theory (Usul al-fiqh), theology, hadith methodology, hadith commentary, and Logic with teachers such as Dr. Ashraf Muneeb, Dr. Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr. Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr. Mansur Abu Zina, and others. He was also given licenses of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabir and Shaykh Yahya Qandil. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic sciences, tafsir, Arabic grammar, and Arabic eloquence.

Mixed Gender Classes

Ustadh Farid Dingle is asked if it is permissible for men and women who are students of knowledge to attend classes where both genders are present.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Can women and men be in one classroom when they are seeking knowledge?

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Dear questioner,

In principle, as long as there are a number of men or women, then it is permissible.

For more detail, please see Mixed Gatherings: A Detailed Response Regarding Gender Interaction and How to Deal with Free Mixing in Public Schools.

Farid

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


 

Wearing Skin-colored Clothing

Ustadh Salman Younas is asked to clarify the rulings on covering one’s awra in cases where one is wearing skin-colored clothing.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

What is the permissibility of wearing skin-colored clothing? For example, I am a women and prefer covering of the feet as awra. However, I have shoes that would normally show my feet if not worn with socks. Can I wear socks that are opaque but skin-colored in order to not have the shoes look odd against white or black socks?

Also, how would this apply to wearing skin-color long sleeve shirts underneath otherwise transparent dresses? Is this halal? Is this a form of deception?

Please note that even though I choose to cover my feet, I would like the answer to this question according to the Hanafi madhhab.

Jazakum Allah khayr.

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

As long as the clothing covers your nakedness (awra) in a manner where an onlooker cannot see the underlying skin in normal conditions, you would be considered as having covered your nakedness. This would be the case even if the clothing you are wearing is ‘skin colored’.

For certain parts of the body (such as the chest), it is also imperative to cover in a manner where the limbs are not clearly defined. In the case of the feet, however, this does not apply since socks inevitably define the shape of the feet.

Salman

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


 

Wearing Minute Amounts of Gold

Ustadh Farid Dingle is asked about the permissibility of wearing watches with minute amounts of gold on the face or the movements.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Islam forbids men from wearing any gold. Is it halal to wear a stainless steel watch with gold on the hands? What if there’s no gold on the outside of the watch, but there’s gold used in the inside movement of the watch? I heard even some smart watches use gold in the components.

I would like to know the Islamic point of view on these questions.

I’ve been thinking about buying a particular watch that has a small amount of gold on the dial, when no gold can touch the hand.
 

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Dear questioner,

If the gold is only atoms think, which is often case, and it is such that a goldsmith could not extract any real among of gold from it, then it would be perfectly fine. (Bushra al-Karim)

If you ask the company, I’m almost certain that’s what they will tell you.

I pray this helps.

Farid

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/13702/

 

Did I Commit Wrongful Takfir?

Ustadh Farid Dingle is asked if calling saying or thinking that a Muslim is non-Muslim wrongfully puts one outside of the fold of Islam.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I once typed a message saying some Muslims I do not like were not true Muslims, whispering the words to myself as I typed them. but then I remembered that Muslim laypeople are not allowed to say that and deleted the message. Did I still commit the sin of wrongful takfir? Does that make me a non-Muslim as that one hadifh said?

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

The only way you leave Islam is by rejecting what made you a Muslim to begin with.

That said, we should all be very careful about what we say, because throwing words and labels around is not permissible.

I pray this helps.

Farid

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


 

Reading Literary Fiction

Ustadh Farid Dingle is asked about the use and benefit of literary fiction, and advises on their possible detriment to faith and love of Allah.

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I would like to ask a question regarding reading literature:

I always enjoyed reading and, especially growing up, I spent many hours reading some of the greatest classics in my own language (Portuguese) and in English. After I became Muslim, I was discouraged from continuing doing so by fellow Muslims. I was told that it was a waste of time to read fiction and stories of people who never existed, regardless of how well these stories have been written. Also, from my own perspective, I started noticing that many of these novels tell stories of morally corrupt people (from an Islamic point of view) and that love, romance, betrayal, even adultery and substance abuse are commonplace. Before Islam I would not even consider this moral aspect, and the mastery of the spoken word was enough to engage me, but now I feel uneasy. Is my reluctance and my Muslims friends’ criticism justified?

I will be grateful for your advice.

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Dear questioner, I will try to answer your question from a few different angles.

The book as your friend

And He has said of the believers that they ‘shun what is vain’ [23:3]

And He has said, ‘And when you see those who engage in [offensive] discourse concerning Our verses, then turn away from them until they enter into another conversion. And if Satan should cause you to forget, then do not remain after the reminder with the wrongdoing people.’ [6:68]

The Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and grant him peace) mentioned three people who would taste the sweetness of faith and of them was, ‘he who would hate to return to disbelief after Allah had saved him just as anyone would hate to be thrown into a fire.’ [Bukhari]

These verses and this hadith tell us that the general rule is to have nothing to do with ‘vain’ ideas and words and books that do not conform to the high morals of Iman, Islam and Ihsan.

And Allah Most High has told us, ‘O you who have believe, fear Allah and be with the true.’ [9:119]

And the Prophet of Allah has said, ‘ًA person is on the religion on his close friend, so let each of you look well to whom he takes as a close friend.

In view of this guidance, we have to make sure that the social, literary and cyber society is something that increases our faith, resolve to change, fear Allah etc., and not something that reminds us of disbelief, turning away from Allah, and preferring ephemeral pleasures to the worship and good-pleasure of Allah Most High.

For this reason, one should be very careful, as you have clearly expressed, of reading material, even if it be of high literary value, that does not lift us up, especially if it talks about clearer immoral and licentious deeds, and even more so if they remind one of a lifestyle and modus operandi that one once followed.

Personally, I have found certain great literary works like Les Miserables, Robinson Crusoe, and a number of Shakespeare’s works like Hamlet and Macbeth, morally uplifting. Even some “in appropriate works”, like Naguib Mahfouz’s Respected Sir, I definitely benefited from as a student of Arabic and as a reminder of the Faustian deal of this world.

Many others, personally, I have found more harmful than beneficial: much of Shakespeare’s work, and many 19th century works like certain works of Hardy and Dickens. The language is amazing, the characterization masterful, but very little moral benefit in the end.

I remember reading the Monastery by Sir Walter Scott and having to put the book down after a short while after getting the sense that although he was outwardly defending religion and, perhaps, religious freedom, he was actually organised religion. (Maybe that’s just my jaundiced view!)

The upshot is that we have to be very selective of what we allow to enter our hearts and minds. It is actually our responsibility to protect them: ‘And pursue not that which you have no knowledge of; the hearing, the sight, the heart — all of those shall be questioned of.’ [17: 36]

Calling others to Islam

Despite all the foregoing, it is important to note that calling others to Islam, and that can only happen properly with a full understanding of the language and culture of those being called to Islam. To be able to do this, we do need to read literature and get some level of cultural exposure, within reasonable bounds of course.

If we look at many well-intentioned translations of religious works, or if we listen to certain lectures by certain religious guides, we feel the huge language gap and we suffer from the disparity in cultural references and norms. All of this is relevant in calling people to Islam.

Do you need to read everything, pure and rotten, and watch every film that the target audience has watched in order to talk to them on their level? There is a level of god-fearing judgment needed to answer this question.

Priorities

One of Allah many blessings upon us is that He has given us very short lives and very limited resources, both of which force upon us a very acute need to prioritize what we do, say, hear and see. Even if something is very beneficial, or even morally incumbent, if may offer be secondary to something even more important and pressing.

If we sit down and ask ourselves very honestly, our knowledge of the Quran and Sunna is very, very limited. Our familiarity and attachment to the live of the best person very to have lived (Allah bless him and grant him peace) is not really there, and the lessons that we have drawn from the best generations after him are very few. In light of this, for most of us, or many of us, to really dedicate our few hours of spare time to anything else is to some extent embarrassing.

We need to prioritize what is obligatory over that which is merely beneficial.

Upshot

Find something in Portuguese that morally uplifts us to some extent, and read with the intention of giving yourself more energy to worship Allah; read with the intention that your language becomes above average such that you can translate the keys texts of Islam into Portuguese and guide people. Whenever you feel something bad in the book, go to another one, unless the benefit is clearly far exceeding the harm.

I pray this helps.

Farid

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/13648/

 

Stealing from a Friend and Making Amends

Ustadh Farid Dingle gives advice on how to make amends for having stolen from a friend one no longer is in contact with.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

When I was in school my friend went to the bathroom and gave her lunchbox to me. I took one of the chicken she had bought and I ate It Will Allah forgive me I have left the school and I don’t have any contact with the girl.

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Assalamu alaykum,

Dear questioner, if you genuinely cannot find her, just give some charity with the intention of an expiation and that she will get the reward.

Farid

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/13116/

 

Buying House Opposite to Temple

Shaykh Jamir Meah is asked if buying a house across from a temple dedicated to another religion is permissible.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Is buying a house opposite to a non-Muslim Temple permissible?
 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I pray you are well insha Allah.

There is no objection to buying a house situated opposite a non-Muslim place of worship.

Warmest salams,

Jamir

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.

 


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Responding to Vulgarities

Shaykh Jamir Meah gives advice on how best to respond to vulgar language used by others in the workplace.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I come in to contact with people in my work place as I go about my work who, as a means of conversation swear for example when mentioning the weather, or talking about the work load or to show appreciation of how it’s almost time to go home.

In response, as this is just a passing remark as they pass me, I tend to smile or laugh and they say something in response and carry on with my work.

Is it permissible for me to laugh or smile like this obligingly as my intention is not to show approval of the vulgar word and I myself do not swear?
 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Thank you for your question.

The Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him, advised us, “Whosoever of you sees an evil, let him change it with his hand, and if he is not able to do so, then [let him change it] with his tongue, and if he is not able to do so, then with his heart, and that is the weakest of faith.” (Muslim)

The way to deal with these situations depends on the type of people you are working with, their reaction, and the potential consequences for you. Unfortunately, swearing and vulgar language is now acceptable in some work places and common place in social circles.

Since more than one person uses offensive language in your office, it would probably be difficult to kindly ask them not to swear, as this may well affect your position and general working relationship. The minimum is to hate such language in your heart, which all of us are able to do.

Smiling or laughing at only the general meaning of their sentence is not sinful in itself, such as the relief that the day is almost finished, even if they swear when expressing it. However, in order not to encourage them, I would suggest not smiling or laughing when they use vulgarities, rather, either stay silent if that is not awkward, or reply with something positive or constructive that is clean, with the intention of showing good character. Knowingly or unknowingly, they may stop swearing in front of you.

Warmest salams,

Jamir

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.