Does the Prophet Know the Unseen?

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Does the Prophet know the unseen (Allah bless him and grant him peace)? Could you please explain the hadith of Aisha (Allah be well-pleased with her) ‘Whoever says that he knows what happens tomorrow is mistaken.’? (Bukhari)

Answer: Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

This question might seen complex but it is in fact very simple.

Allah knows things innately, and therefore knows everything. Created beings do not know things innately, so they can only know what Allah causes them to know. A prophet is caused to know things by conventional means (like the five senses and deduction) and by revelation.

Whatever Allah chose to cause the Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) to know, he knows; and whatever He chose to keep from him, He kept from him. The exact details are not a point of creed, but can be gleamed from various hadith.

Fuller Answer

What is it to know the “unseen”?

The unseen is term for things that we can only know through revelation. Knowledge of the unseen has been defined as ‘that which was unperceivable by the senses, and that which is neither known a fortiori or known by inference.’ (al-Nibras, Farhari)

Since the knowledge given to the prophets from Allah is either by revelation (which is like a fortiori knowledge with respect to them) or by exposing their senses to things that others can’t see or hear, whatever they know is not as such “knowing the unseen”. (al-Nibras, Farhari)

Who is shown the “unseen”?

Allah Most High says, ‘[He is] Knower of the unseen, and He does not disclose His [knowledge of the] unseen to anyone except whom He has approved of messengers.’ (Qur’an, 72:26-7)

These verses tell us that Allah gives special knowledge to his prophets and messengers (upon whom be blessings and peace). (Tafsir al-Tabari)

It is also possible that Allah give certain knowledge to a righteous Muslim by way of miracle. (Sharh al-Aqaid, Taftazani; Fatawa Shihab al-Ramli)

An example of this is when Sayyidna Umar saw in a dream the battle ground of his troops during a campaign in the Conquest of Persia and was able to tell them from Medina to stay next to the mountain in order to force the Persians to attach from one particular direction. (Tarikh al-Umam wa al-Muluk, Tabari)

According to Sunni Islam, what exactly does the Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) know?

As mentioned before, as long as we understand that Allah knows things innately while His creatures merely learn or are caused to know things, the fine line between Creator and created, between tahwid and shirk is decisively drawn. Thereafter, whatever Allah chooses to have any of His creation know is not of creedal concern.

There are certain hadiths wherein the Sahaba mentioned that the Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) ‘didn’t leave a bird in the sky save that he mentioned some knowledge concerning it.’ (Ahmad and Tabarani) Others mention that he mentioned ‘everything that would come to pass up until the Day of Rising.’ (Tirmidhi)

Imam al-Busiri is famous for the line ‘And of his knowledge is the knowledge of Tablet and the Pen.’

Commenting upon this, Ibn Hajar al-Haytami says, ‘[This] is because Allah Most High showed him everything in the Tablet on the Night of Ascension, and gave him knowledge of other things too.’ (al-Umda fi Sharh al-Burda, Ibn Hajar al-Haytami)

Knowing everything in the Tablet is something in principle possible for a normal human being, as explained by Imam al-Ghazali. (Qanun al-Tawil, Ghazali) Whether or not is has happened, or will happen, is not a point of creed.

Conclusion

The essential difference between our knowledge and Allah’s knowledge is that His is innate, while our knowledge is caused by His will and power.

Allah gives knowledge to certain individual of His creation by different means. However much knowledge Allah chooses to give a particular individual is not of major concern. It is like trying to pinpoint exactly how much happiness/wealth/health Allah will give any given person in Paradise.

I pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed. 

Divine Decree and Misgivings

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I am suffering a great deal of waswass regarding the issue of Destiny. I hear people say different things about it: Allah is in control of everything,
or our decree can be changed because of our actions. It is on my mind most of the time and giving me a lot of stress, making me worry about many elements in my life, feeling like I have to manage everything and not mess up ANYTHING.

Everything is within Allah’s will, even our sins (He does not force us, but He allows us to sin, so it is our responsibility). Thus, we cannot blame Him for our sins. But are the outcomes of our sins (and good deeds) entirely our fault as well?

Answer: Wa’alaykum assalam, I pray you’re well.

Do not delve too much into the question of Divine Decree, as it is something that the mind has not been created to comprehend in detail, nor will a person be asked about it. What matters to you and I is what is within our ability to know and act upon. Anything else, particularly without any guided study, will only cause waswasa.

Example

Take a simple example; the movement of your arm. You know you have a sense of will to move it or not move it. You also experience some power and ability to move it, should you so wish. When you move your arm you observe that you have moved it. All of this, your perceived will, ability and act, are experienced and witnessed by you. However, do you know the exact physiological mechanism by which all this happened? Do you have knowledge, understand, or even observe the neurological and muscular changes and interaction occurring in your arm and brain during the simple process? It’s unlikely.

Likewise, every one of us perceives our ability to act, whether to do good or to sin. This is our free will. God knew from pre-eternality that which we would choose and he creates for us what we choose, whether to be obedient or to be disobedient. How this all happens, and the full wisdom of God’s acts are not known to us, and nor is Allah obliged to explain anything to us.

This is the nature of a true Deity who holds absolute Sovereignty over his creation, ‘He is not questioned about what He does, but they will [all] be questioned.’ [21:23]

Changing Divine Decree

There is nothing beyond God’s knowledge, and His knowledge and Decree never change. What was meant to be will be and that which was not, will not. Therefore, no act of a created being, whether virtuous or sinful, changes, interferes or ‘messes up’ the Divine Decree. Everything that was, is and will be has been written and preserved in the Guarded Tablet, and this does not change.

What we perceive as changes in circumstance, answering of prayers, calamities and trials, are all part of Allah’s Decree, which preordained everything from pre-eternality, is already written, though we experience unfolding in time and observe as ‘changes’. In reality, these ‘changes’ and their causes were already destined.

Waswasa

The above is a brief summary of this subject. If your doubts are due to a basic lack of knowledge, then I recommend studying aqidah. You may take one of our free courses online. However, if these are constant issues and affecting your faith and practice, then you may also want to seek further support or counseling to get to the root of your doubts and fears.

Remember, we are only held accountable for that which we are capable of knowing and doing, nothing more. All you need to concern yourself with is doing good deeds and avoiding sins. Leave anything beyond your ability to understand or act upon. The hows and whys do not affect the outcome of you next life, actions do.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath. 

Rank of Ahl Al-Bayt.

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Allah says in the Quran that no one is higher than another except through Godfearingness. Yet, in the hadith prohibiting zakat for Ahl al-Bayt, the Prophet (Peace and blessings be upon him) says that Zakat should not be given to the family of Muhammad because it is from the dirt of the people.

So, using logic, this means that the Ahl al-Bayt are in a sense, “too pure,” for zakat while others can use “the dirt of the people.” Doesn’t this mean that there is a superior cast in Islam?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

I pray you are well.

Individual Ranks

Yes, the overall, default ruling in Islam is that no individual has a higher rank than another except through the criterion of Godfearingness (taqwa). Allah said, “Indeed the noblest of you in the sight of Allah are the most Godfearing of you.” (49:13). May Allah grant us all this great honour. Amin.

Taqwa is the means to nobility which can take a lowly slave and raise him above aristocracy. Bilal was, at a point, tortured in Mecca. Then there came a day when he called the adman whist standing on to of the Kaʿba itself.

Collective Ranks

This is with regards to individuals. As for groups and collectives, some – in general – have virtues others do not; or some possess praiseworthy traits to a degree that others do not. The Arabs, for example, are like this.

The Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace, said, “Indeed Allah chose Kinana from the descendants of Ismaʿil; and He chose Quraysh from Kinana, and Banu Hashim from Quraysh, and Me from Banu Hashim.” (Muslim).

This means that, as a whole, from the tribes of Arabs there are those with praiseworthy traits and qualities that other tribes may not have. There may be individuals from one tribe who are superior to many members of other tribes who are seen as superior in general. The discussion is about collectives.

These qualities can be many, such as generosity, bravery, being true to one’s word, etc. Although these traits can be acquired through effort, for some they are transferred from parent to child over generations. Recent discoveries in the field of Morphic Resonance would seem to corroborate this.

No one surpasses the Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace, in this. For this reason, his descendants, in general, have a higher social standing in Islam. It is perfectly possible, however, for someone who is not descended from them to be superior to an individual amongst them. (Alusi, Ruh al Maʿani; Ibn al Humam, Fath al Qadir).

When addressing the wives of the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace, who are also from his household (Ahl al-Bayt), “O Prophetic House, clearly Allah just wants to remove all filth from you and to completely purify you.” (33:33).

There are many hadith which indicate their virtues individually and collectively. One such hadith was narrated by sayyiduna Jabir, who said he heard the Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace, say on the day of Arafa (in the farewell pilgrimage, “O people, I have left that which you will not go astray with if you hold onto it: the books of Allah, and my family.” (Tirmidhi).

Suitability in Marriage

Suitability is also considered in marriage because it is the union of two families, and not just of two individuals. Someone could possess many praiseworthy qualities, however, the family may not wish to consider him due to a perceived social stigma because of his wider family.

In the absence of such suitability issues, should the lady be happy to marry someone it is obligatory on the family to allow them to marry them (Marghinani, al Hidaya). Personal merit is a better measure of suitability, in general, as not everyone inherits all the virtues of their lineage.

Making Getting Married Easy

The Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “If someone whose religious practice and character are pleasing to you comes with a marriage proposal [for a lady] then marry him [to her]. Should you fail to do so there will be corruption in the land and widespread problems.” (Tirmidhi).

Some parents go beyond the due diligence expected of them and try to prevent marriages based on standards which have no religious basis. For example, insisting that the suitor has to be a relative, or from a particular village ‘back home’, or belonging to a now redundant ‘family profession’ classification. At times this delays people from marrying way past their prime – if they do marry at all. In some situations people resort to extra-marital sex as a way to fulfil their needs. This has many other problems attached to it, such as abortions.

In some parts of the Middle East there is a practice of demanding an extortionately high mahr, which makes marriage near impossible for many young men and ladies. It is notable, however, that the righteous in Damascus would make the process of marriage as easy as possible for people. Some asked for a low – but respectable – mahr, and others even approached young men in whom they recognised virtue, and offered them their daughters.

We can infer from the hadith that in situations where getting married is made complicated – whether it is through prolonged engagements, demands of high mahrs, expectations of flashy, ostentatious weddings, and so on – many, widespread problems can be expected. The solution is to return to the sunna.

I pray this helps. May Allah grant you the best of both worlds.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 to study and sit at the feet of some of the most erudite scholars of our time.

Over the following eighteen months he studied a traditional curriculum, studying with scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish.

In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years, in Fiqh, Usul al-Fiqh, Theology, Hadith Methodology and Commentary, Shama’il, and Logic with teachers such as Dr Ashraf Muneeb, Dr Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr Mansur Abu Zina amongst others. He was also given two licences of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabr and Shaykh Yahya Qandil.

His true passion, however, arose in the presence of Shaykh Ali Hani, considered by many to be one of the foremost tafsir scholars of our time who provided him with the keys to the vast knowledge of the Quran. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic Sciences, Tafsir, Arabic Grammar, and Rhetoric.

When he finally left Jordan for the UK in 2014, Shaykh Ali gave him his distinct blessing and still recommends students in the UK to seek out Shaykh Abdul-Rahim for Quranic studies. Since his return he has trained as a therapist and has helped a number of people overcome emotional and psychosomatic issues. He is a keen promoter of emotional and mental health.

Is Allah Really Merciful?

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

My question is simple “Who is Allah really?”. On paper (quran, hadidth) Allah is mentioned as being most merciful.

But in reality He is simply not merciful or anything (at least for me). He is mean, stingy, non merciful. I even feel that He likes that I am in pain.

Answer: Assalamu alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Had Allah willed, you and I would not exists, you and I would not breathe, you and I would be forever hungry, be forever in fear, be forever in pain. We must reflect upon this and thank Him for that.

Above and beyond this, Allah has given us the chance to abide in Paradise for ever, and ever and ever. All we have to do is hold on to His guidelines for a short time and then we die and pass the test, inshaAllah. This is huge blessing. We should never stop thanking Allah for this.

So Allah is merciful and kind. I pray this has answered your question.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed. 

What Is a Saint in Islam? How Does a Person Become One?

Answered by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Question: Assalamu alaykum

What Is a Saint in Islam? How Does a Person Become One?

Answer:  Wa’leykum Salam,

Here is a video answer by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani to this question:

[Shaykh] Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Faraz Rabbani is a scholar and researcher of Islamic law and Executive Director of SeekersHub Global After ten years overseas, Shaykh Faraz returned to Canada in the Summer of 2007. In May 2008 he founded SeekersHub Global to deal with the urgent need to spread Islamic knowledge—both online and on the ground—in a reliable, relevant, inspiring, and accessible manner. He has been repeatedly listed as one of the world’s 500 most influential Muslims (The Muslim500).

How to Repent from a Statement of Disbelief?

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I intentionally spoke kufr statements in my mind while believing in it and when I finished the sentences immediately I rejected it and denounced it. Am i still in the fold of islam?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

If you said genuinely something that was disbelief while believing it, but then repented, rejected it, and said the testimony of faith again, then you are a believer and there is no reason to worry.

The reproachful soul

Allah Most High swears by the soul that wants to change, blames itself for its bad ways and works against its own bad grain to become something loved in Allah’s eyes. He says, ‘And I swear by the reproaching soul.’

This is exactly what the Early Muslims dealt with.

Muslim narrates from Abu Hurayra that some of the Prophet’s own students (Allah bless him and grant him peace, and be well-pleased with his companions and family) came to him complaining of the thoughts they would have. They said, ‘Indeed we find in our hearts thoughts that we find too gross to ever utter.’
‘Did you really find it?’
‘Yes,’ they replied.
‘That is pure faith!’

This hadith teaches us that finding our own deeds and thoughts revolting and rejecting them with our hearts is actually something very great in Allah’s eyes.

Don’t lose hope

The Devil loves to distract us from doing good works and improving on our faith by repeatedly reminding us of our bad deeds to the extent that he makes us lose hope in Allah. Allah Most High has said, ‘And do not lose hope of Allah’s Mercy. Certainly no one despairs of Allah’s Mercy, except the people who disbelieve.’ [12: 87]

Just thank Allah and move on with improving your faith.

Please also see this answer.

Upshot

Don’t get sad, and don’t get depressed. Just get going.

‘And march forth in the way to forgiveness from your Lord, and to a garden as wide as are the heavens and the earth, prepared for those who actively push aware evil.’ [3: 133]

I pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed. 

Have I Converted to Islam?

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

A long time ago I decided to become a Muslim, but I am not actually sure if I recited the Shahhadah or not. I have seriously conflicting memories on whether I did or not. But I came to assume I converted anyway, became a devout Muslim for a brief time, then committed kufr. Then eventually I decided to reconvert. This time, I properly recited the Shahhadah and did Ghusl.

Regardless of whether I did properly convert the first time, did my recitation of the Shahhadah count, even though it was with the intention of reconverting, not converting? Also, I recited the Shahhadah by a whisper. Does it still count? What should I do?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Just assume you became Muslim at that earliest time.

The significance of the testimony of faith (the Shahadah) is only your legal status in a Muslim country, that is to say whether or not you can marry a Muslim woman, and whether or not you can inherit from other Muslims.

You become a believer by believing, regardless of making the testimony of faith.

I pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed.

Argument Leading to Disbelief?

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

Our neighbor died as a christian. My grandmother really liked him for some reason and cried a lot because he died. I’m pretty sure that she knew that he was a non muslim, but nevertheless she said things like ‘may his place be Paradise’. I was arguing with her and then I told my grandmother that non muslims won’t enter paradise. Then I think She said that Allah knows this. I responded with ‘no’ but I didn’t intend to deny that Allah is All-Knowing. What’s the ruling on that? Is it disbelief?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

Thank you for your question

There are two aspects regarding your question that I would like to address:

1. Praying for non-Muslims

The ruling of praying for Non-Muslims differs from before and after death. Prior to his or her death, it is permissible to pray for them in terms of guidance or any worldly benefit. As for after death, it is not permitted for a Muslim to pray for a non-Muslim as far as forgiveness of shirk (ascribing partners unto Allah) or entry into paradise is concerned [Fatawa al-Nawawi]. It is however permissible for a Muslim to pray that Allah forgives a non-Muslim for sins, other than shirk [Hashiyah al-Shabramallisi].

2. Pronouncement of disbelief unintentionally

Someone who unintentionally makes a pronouncement of disbelief is not considered a disbeliever. RasuluLlah sallaLlahu alayhi wasallam said, “The liability of three things has been lifted from my ummah: forgetfulness, mistake and duress.”

Accordingly, you are not guilty of disbelief.
May Allah grant us steadfastness in all thats good, and protect us from all evil, Amin.

And Allah knows best.

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Visions of Heaven.

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Are people’s claim to see heaven true? Even if when the form of transport to heaven for the Prophet Muhammad (Peace and blessings be upon him) was on a winged horse?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

I pray you are well.

Yes, it is possible for someone on earth to be shown Paradise whilst still on earth. This is something rationally possible, and we have precedent for similar events from the lives of the prophets, Allah bless them and grant them peace, and the companions, may Allah be well pleased with them all.

The Visions of Ibrahim and ʿUmar

Allah Almighty said, ‘And no less than that, did We show Ibrahim the perfect, immense dominion of the heavens and earth, and our sovereignty over them; and [We did this] so that he may be of those of absolute certainty.’ (6:75). For Ibrahim to have been shown the whole universe, and beyond, as a child – as the Qurʾan indicates – is something in the realm of possibility.

If someone can be shown the furthest reaches of creation, then being shown Paradise is also a possibility.

Imam Ibn Kathir also narrated a rigorously authenticated narration regarding sayyiduna ʿUmar – whilst delivering a sermon in Medina – seeing a group of Muslims who were about to ambushed hundreds of miles away. He called out to warn them, and they heard his voice and reacted appropriately.

Miracles Granted to the Righteous

A vision is not the same as travelling a distance. Yet, it is also possible for a person to be transported from one place to another. Physicists affirm the possibility of the occurrent of a ‘wormhole’, which is the nexus of two distant points in the universe through the folding of space.

The occurrence of such events has been reported as having to many individuals, such as the grandfather of the great Moroccan saint and scholar, Ahmad b. ʿAjiba. He mentioned it himself in his autobiography, which is an excellent work.

Imam Ibrahim al Laqqani, in his great didactic poem, Jawhara al Tawhid (The Gem of Divine Oneness), said,

“You must affirm for the saintly miracles,
Those who deny them cast aside their rambles.”

Dr Mostafa al Badawi, a distinguished contemporary scholar, discussed these metaphysical matters in his work ‘A Higher Reality‘ which is highly recommended.

May Allah grant you the best of both worlds.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 to study and sit at the feet of some of the most erudite scholars of our time.

Over the following eighteen months he studied a traditional curriculum, studying with scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish.

In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years, in Fiqh, Usul al-Fiqh, Theology, Hadith Methodology and Commentary, Shama’il, and Logic with teachers such as Dr Ashraf Muneeb, Dr Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr Mansur Abu Zina amongst others. He was also given two licences of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabr and Shaykh Yahya Qandil.

His true passion, however, arose in the presence of Shaykh Ali Hani, considered by many to be one of the foremost tafsir scholars of our time who provided him with the keys to the vast knowledge of the Quran. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic Sciences, Tafsir, Arabic Grammar, and Rhetoric.

When he finally left Jordan for the UK in 2014, Shaykh Ali gave him his distinct blessing and still recommends students in the UK to seek out Shaykh Abdul-Rahim for Quranic studies. Since his return he has trained as a therapist and has helped a number of people overcome emotional and psychosomatic issues. He is a keen promoter of emotional and mental health.

Uttering Words of Disbelief.

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

My friend uttered words of disbelief with his tongue which he did not belief in his heart. But he is not sure whether he did it on purpose or not. During the course of the day he renounced it but one thing he is sure is that he did not belief what he said. Is his Islam still valid?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

Thank you for your question.

There are two positions among the scholars regarding one who utters words of disbelief, intentionally, but not intending its meaning or not intending to actually depart from Islam. The position of the majority is that the utterance of disbelief, intentionally, even though not intending its meaning, is disbelief. The second position states that it is not disbelief. [Radd al-Muhtar]

Accordingly, it is advised that your friend recites the testimony of faith and repent from those utterances. This also serves as a lesson for us all to be more particular regarding that which we utter and pronounce.

May Allah protect us all and grant that we leave this world upon Iman and faith in Him and His Prophet sallaLlahu alayhi wasallam.

And Allah knows best

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.