In What Order Should One Study the Shafii Madhab, and Which Books of Fiqh Should One Study?

Question: In what order should one study the Shafii madhab, and which books of fiqh should one study?

Answer: Wa alaykum assalamu wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you very much for your poignant question.

What is generally observed across the Shafii world is that they study Matn Abi Shuja, Fath al Muin, and then Minhaj al Talibin.

Stages of Learning

The great late Shafii scholar, Imam al Bajuri mentions that there are three levels of learning.

The first is when you do not have an idea about the general discussions of the given science. Such a person is trying to acquire that basic picture.

The second is the student who has an overview of the discussions, but not in much detail or much mastery. Such a student then needs to achieve mastery and detail.

The third is he who has the mastery of the details and is able to decisively prove (or debate) them. This the final stage of learning, and the goal of studying fiqh. (Hashiya Bajuri ala Ibn Qasim, Bajuri)

With this in mind, what is generally observed across the Shafii world is that they study Matn Abi Shuja, Fath al Muin, and then Minhaj al Talibin, with the three books covering the three levels above.

Many will add many other books in the first and second stages, and this generally brings about better results. That said, Ibn Khaldun was critical of students reading lots of primers. (Prolegomena, Ibn Khaldun)

Self Study

Imam al Nawawi seems to have studied three books in fiqh: the Tanbih of Shirazi, the Wasit of Ghazali, and the Muhadhdhab of Shirazi. With each, he spent a long time with his teachers clarifying the meanings, implications, and details of the rulings within.

That said, he didn’t just read with his teachers, but when he reached a certain level, he read very, very extensively. This is what made Nawawi so significant.

And this is the case with all big ulema. None of them simply sat with their teachers and took down notes. Rather, they sat, took notes, researched, debated, etc, until they reached the level of their own teachers.

One of my own teachers actually forbade me to ask any questions that didn’t stem from my own reading. He told me that for every one hour of class time, I had to do nine hours of reading.

That said, doing the extensive reading before the first stage mentioned above is not a good idea at all, and one should always refer back to one’s teachers and not just go off on one’s own path.

Conclusion

In view of the third-level learning stage, any well-known primers that enable the student to achieve the learning goals are good. Matn Abi Shuja, Fath al Muin, and then Minhaj al Talibin have been a mainstay of many Shafi’is for about four hundred years.

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid Dingle

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Joining prayers at work

Question: In winter the time between Dhuhr and Maghrib in my country is very short. Am I allowed to join prayers while I am at work?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

If praying Dhuhr and Asr on time pose great hardship, due to the nature of one’s work or medical condition, one may combine Dhuhr and Asr either before Maghrib time comes in, or at the beginning of Dhuhr. (Kashhaf al Qina, Bahuti; Bughyat al Mustarshidin, Abd al Rahman Mashhur; Rawdat al Talibin, Nawawi; Kifayat al Akhyar, Hisni; al Awsat, Ibn al Mundhir)

One should be very careful not to abuse this dispensation. There is a big difference between the genuine practical impossibility of praying on time because one’s work requires one to keep watch of something, for example, for the whole prayer time, and the mere awkwardness of asking to go for a prayer break. Joining for the latter reason is cowardice and is sinful.

As the scholars say, one should only take a dispensation when one genuinely feels that Allah Himself wants one to take it. ‘And Allah knows the man who means mischief from the man who means good.’ (Qur’an, 2: 220)

If one’s work does not allow even one to pray Dhuhr and Asr by joining, then one must look for other work.

I pray this helps.

[Shaykh] Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Combining two intentions in one act of worship

Question: When can one merge two acts of worship in one?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

The default is that each act of worship is independent and requires an independent intention.

That said sometimes one act of worship subsumes another, such as prayer and prostration. One doesn’t need to intend prostration because it is subsumed within the prayer that one already intended.

Sometimes two acts of worship are indeed separate but one fulfills the other in its general sense. For example, the sunna of praying upon entering a mosque can be fulfilled by any prayer, sunna, or obligatory because the point is just not sitting down. The sunna of praying upon entering a mosque is in reality just a product of the prohibition of entering a mosque and sitting down without praying, so it is not sought of in and of itself and can be fulfilled by any prayer. (Tuhfat al Muhtaj, Ibn Hajar; al Majmu al Mudhahhab fi Qawaid al Madhhab, Alai; al Qawaid al Fiqhiyya, Saqqaf)

Other times the question is whether or not both of the actions are sought of in and of themselves. Fasting in Shawwal, for example, is considered an independent sunna that is specifically recommended. Some scholars were of the opinion that it is not a specific sunna, but rather a general recommendation to fast any six days in the month after Ramadan that could be fulfilled by make-ups, fasting on Mondays and Thursdays or any other fast. (Tuhfat al Muhtaj, Ibn Hajar; al Qawaid al Fiqhiyya, Saqqaf)

Then there is joining an act of worship with a worldly intention… For example, someone wants to lose weight and by fasting, so they join a generally recommended or generally obligatory intention of losing weight with a specific act of worship and get both rewards. (al Qawaid al Fiqhiyya, Saqqaf)

So whenever an action is subsumed within another, an action is not recommended in a specific sense, it is often possible to merge two intentions in one act of worship.

I pray this helps.

Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Can Muslim Women Be Imams?

Answered by Ustadh Farid Dingle

Question: assalam alaykum, I´m from Italy and here some people think that Islam is for man and the woman have a second place in Islam. I see a program on tv, about women can be Imam, and they say this is a revolution inside Islam. So my question are: woman can be Imam in a community? She can be Imam for women and men? Where in the Holy Qur’an say that woman can’t be Imam for the Ummah?

Answer: Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Gender equality in Islam

Allah looks at everyone equally and everyone is welcomed to draw near to Him in sincerity, dedication, fear and hope. Whoever excels another in these is greater in Allah’s eyes, regardless of race or gender.

Allah Most High says, ‘Verily, Muslim men and Muslim women, believing men and believing women, worshipful men and worshipful women, true men and true women, patient men and patient women, humbled men and humbled women, men and women who give in charity, men who fast and women who fast, men who protect their chastity and women, and men who remember Allah much and women, Allah has prepared for them [indescribable] forgiveness and a tremendous reward.’ [33: 35]

So All men and women are equal before Allah, irrespective of gender.

That said, Allah has also told us in the Quran that He has not given everyone in this life the same provision, and rights and responsibilities:

´It is We who have divided up each person’s livelihood in the Lower Life, and we have raised some over other whole categories such that some should be subject to others. And your Lord’s mercy is better than that which they amass’ [43: 32]

Some people are rich, and that gives them the right to buy things that others can’t; that also gives them the responsibility to support others. Some people are strong and healthy, and that gives them the right to enjoy their health, and the responsibility to defend the weak. Some people are really intelligent and have the ability and therefore the responsibility to fulfill certain communal obligations, such as being a brain surgeon or a mufti. Some others do not have such capabilities, such opportunities, etc., and this is all from the wisdom and mercy of Allah.

None of this “favouritism” reflects how Allah looks at His slaves: they are all equal and their true and ultimate rank is how they are morally.

And one such way that Allah has apportioned and organised temporal life in this “Lower Life” is that He has not made men and women the same, and has not given them the same rights and responsibilities.

Allah has said in the Quran, ‘Men are in charge of women because We have given more to some than others.’ [4: 34]

Men are not women, and women are not men. Allah has made two genders to compliment one another, and has put one in charge of the other in this life, even though they are equal before Allah’s eyes in the next.

Well, to what degree are men in charge of women?

Generally speaking, no man has any control or say in what another man or woman does. However the general tack in Islam is that men are in charge of leadership roles, such as being the caliph, judgeship, leading the household, and leading the Eid and Friday prayers.

Woman can be and do many things: they can be politicians, muftis, CEOs, millionaires, writers, revolutionists, mothers, astronauts, you name it! But there is a general hierarchy in things that touch the structure and performance of the Muslim community.

This responsibility, dictates that one follow the other, and the other show mercy, consideration, stewardship to the other in light of the grave responsibility that rests on his shoulders. This hierarchy is for everyone’s benefit: emotionally, physically, financially, politically, economically …

Responsibility means answerability: so men, or women, who abuse their rights and do not fulfill their what is required of them, must provide an answer for their transgressions before a Sharia court in this life, and Allah’s court in the next.

For more details on Women’s active role in the authority, please see: Do the Hadiths Say Women Can’t Be Leaders?

Can women lead the prayer

Please see: How a Female Imam Should Lead a Congregation of Women in Prayer? [Shafi’i School]

An Explanation of the Hanafi School’s Position on Women’s Congregational Prayer

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid Dingle

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to crafts lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language.

A Ramadan Reader: A Comprehensive Answers Guide to Getting the Most Out of Ramadan

Preparing for Ramadan

The Complete Guide to Fasting

Imam Tahir’s 5 Simple Steps to Prepare for Ramadan

Preparing For Ramadan Advice from Habib Umar bin Hafiz

Ramadan Detox‬‏ for a Healthy Ramadan

40 Hadiths on Ramadan

Tarawih

Can I Pray 8 Rakats for Tarawih?

Should We Stop Praying Tarawih Once the Qur’an is Completed?

Is it Necessary to Perform Tarawih Prayers in the Mosque?

Is it Obligatory to Complete the Entire Qur’an During Tarawih Prayers?

Performing Tarawih Prayers Again as an Imam

Is It Valid for a Child to Lead Tarawih?

The Ruling of the Tarawih Prayer: A Confirmed Sunna

Reciting From a Copy of the Qur’an (Mushaf) in Tarawih and Other Prayers

Expiatory Payment (Fidya) for Missed Ramadan Fasts

Brief Overview of Expiatory Payments (fidya) for Missed Ramadan Fasts

Feeding People to Expiate For a Corrupted Fast

Is Expiation (kaffara) Necessary For Not Fasting in Ramadan?

When Is Expiation Required For A Fast?

How Many Expiations Are Required For Multiple Broken Fasts?

Can My Sister Pay Expiatory Payments (fidya) For Missed Fasts Due To Her Diabetes?

Can I Pay Fidya for Missed Days of Fasting Due to Menses?

Can a Healthy Person Skip Prayer and Fasting and Pay Expiation?

The Expiation (Kaffara) for Having Sex While Fasting

Must I Fast 180 Days as Expiation for 3 Broken Fasts?

Things that Break the Fast

Principles on what invalidates the fast

Does Watching Pornography While Fasting Break One’s Fast

Using Creams, Powders, or Topical Medications While Fasting

Does Swallowing Phlegm Break Your Fast?

Vaseline On Lips While Fasting, and Hitting Kids

Applying Medicine to One’s Teeth: Does it Invalidate the Fast?

Ramadan: Injections, Eye Drops, And Doubts

Using Chapstick While Fasting

Accidental & Forgetful Breaking of the Fast: What Is the Difference?

What Corrupts a Fast: Questions About Water Entering the Body

Bleeding Gums While Fasting

The Effect of Smoking on Fasting, and the Effect of Sins on Faith

Using Asthma Medication: Is My Fast Invalidated?

Accidentally Inhaling Perfume While Fasting

Does breathing in Air break one’s Fast?

Passionate Kissing While Fasting

Fasting and Illness

Too Sick to Fast in Ramadan, Too Poor to Pay the Expiatory Payment (Fidya)

Long-Term Illness that Prevents Fasting

How Can I Benefit From Ramadan When I Can’t Fast Due to Being Ill?

Laylat al-Qadr

When is Laylat al-Qadr?

Worship & Prayer on Laylat al-Qadr

Making Up Missed Fasts

Making Up Missed Fasts and Illness

Can I Combine My Intentions for a Missed Ramadan Fast and An Optional Sunnah Fast?

Do I Have To Make Up Missed Fasts Within A Year?

Making up Obligatory Fasts and Prayers

Making of Missed Fast

Years of Missed Fasts and Expiation (kaffara)

Breaking One’s Fast/Not Fasting Due to Hardship

Breaking One’s Fast Due to Weakness & Migraines

Can I Break My Fast If My Job Makes Fasting Too Difficult?

Fasting in Extreme Latitudes

Attending Juma, Praying and Fasting While Training to be a Firefighter

Can I Break My Fast If My Job Makes Fasting Too Difficult?

Fasting and Pregnancy

Pregnant Women & Fasting

Pregnancy & Making Up Fasts: Does She Really Have To?

The Spiritual Retreat (I`tikaf)

The Spiritual Retreat (i`tikaf)

The Three Types of I’tikaf (Spiritual Retreat)

Ramadan Advice, Benefits and Inspiration

Worship in Ramadan For a Menstruating Woman

How Do I Make The Most Of Ramadan?

Fasting Its Principles and Virtues-Imam Ghazali from al-Arab’in

Inner Dimensions of Fasting-Imam Ghazali

The Spiritual Purpose of Fasting – Closeness to Allah

Practical Tips for Fasting During Ramadan

Work Ethics for Muslims Fasting During Ramadan

Prophetic Supplications for Fasting

Virtues of Fasting in the Summer

Health Benefits of Fasting, and the Maximum Recommended Fast

General Ramadan Answers

When and Where Do I Break My Fast on a 20 Hour Airline Flight?

Should I Feel Bad for Not Fasting When I Had to Travel?

At What Age Must One Start Fasting?

Eating After Dawn & Breaking The Fast For An Invitation

The Chaining of Shayateen (Devils) During Ramadan

Does Each Makeup Prayer During Ramadan Count as 70 Makeup Prayers?

Intercourse during the month of Ramadan

Is Your Ramadan Fast Still Valid If You Stop Eating and Make Your Intention to Fast Between Fajr and Islamic Midday?

Should I Feel Bad for Not Fasting When I Had to Travel?

Brief Miscellaneous Q & A Relating to Fasting

Newlyweds Having Intercourse While Fasting During Ramadan

Missing Exams and Friday Prayer Due to the COVID-19

Answered by Ustadha Shazia Ahmad

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Due to the recent outbreak of the coronavirus, my mother has become very ‘over-protective’; she is not letting me attend the Friday prayer. What should I do? Furthermore, in a few months, I am going to be sitting my exams (once this time and in another 2 years)- these are exams for which I have been learning content for almost 2 whole years- some of these exams are taking place when the Friday prayer happens. What should I do? I cannot find anyone to carry it out personally. Also, if I do find someone in the near future, can you provide me with the minimum khutbah to be said.

Answer: Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for your question. This recent outbreak has had everybody on edge and rightly so. Your mother is correct that her life will be put at risk if you venture outside unnecessarily as people over 60 can succumb to the disease. The speed with which this virus is spreading is shocking and we are all responsible for doing our part in order to protect others around us.

In the current climate, it is not obligatory to pray the Friday prayer, instead, you can pray dhuhr at home. I believe by now, many Friday prayers around the world have already been canceled. Please see these links:

Guidance on the Coronavirus & Attending the Mosque
The Shafiʿi School On Friday Prayer and Congregational Prayer During Epidemics
Can I Perform Friday Prayer (Jum’a) at Home During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

Considering that schools and non-essential businesses have been suspended in many countries, I am certain that your exam has been delayed by the school or organization. If not, I would call them and tell them that you will need to re-schedule the exam until the danger of the virus as passed. Generally, everything is on hold except for the absolutely urgent. In the US, SAT exams have been delayed and others I am sure.

I ask that Allah protect everyone from this epidemic, and make it a means for us to remember who we are, why we are here and Whom we will return to.

Wassalam,
[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterwards, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Playing Chess

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

My son is very strong in playing chess.Can we let him play chess in tournaments? What about tournaments where there is prize money for a winner?
Can we use this money? What about making it as career?

Answer: Wa alaykum salam

Thank you for your question.

All the schools of law agree that if playing chess leads to one of the following, it is haram or impermissible to play it:

1. gambling
2. any indecency
3. neglecting prayer by delaying it beyond its allotted time
4. a state of heedlessness of Allah.

Even if these evils are absent, scholars still differ about the permissibility or impermissibility of chess. The Shafi’i school is possibly the most lenient in this regard. Imam Nawawi mentions two positions in his various works, namely the official view that it is makruh or reprehensible to play chess and another view that it is permissible (Rawdah al-Talibin). Please note that, in a broad sense, ‘makruh’ is regarded as a lesser form of permissibility than ‘permissible’.

In his Tuhfah, ibn Hajar al-Haytami says regarding the narrations that prohibit the playing of chess and the like,

“However, Hafiz ibn Hajar al-Asqalani said, “not a single tradition has been transmitted through an authentic or sound transmission. In addition, a number of the senior companions and many successors (tabi’in) played it. From among those who played it was (the great scholar) Sa’id ibn Jubayr, may Allah be pleased with him.”

In conclusion, if your son is able to maintain a balance such that the game does not consume him and he does not become negligent of his Creator, Allah, glory be to Him, then the playing of chess will be permissible – makruh according to the official view and simply permissible according to the non-official view.

And Allah knows best

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Is it Disbelief to Draw Pictures?

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

I was told that we cannot pray for a muslim who has died or allow them to buried in a muslim graveyard if they are known to have made sculptures in this life. Are muslim image makers outside of Islam and eternally punished as those who commit shirk are?

Answer: Wa alaykum salam

Shukran for your question.

The primary narrations related to your question were transmitted by Imams Bukhari and Muslim. They are:

“The most severely punished people on the Day of Judgement will be image-makers.”

“Those who make images will be punished on the Day of Judgement and it will be said to them, ‘Give life to what you have created.’”

Thereafter, scholars differed regarding the meanings of these reports. In his Fath al-Bari, ibn Hajar has a lengthy discussion from which the following are important to consider.

Taswir or image-making

Some scholars like Khattabi, considered the image-making mentioned in the narrations above to refer specifically to three dimensional images. The majority however, including Imam Nawawi, considered the warning to apply to both three and two dimensional images.

What is important to consider here is that scholars differed, and while one may subscribe to a certain opinion, the views of our scholars demands our respect. Our respect for the opinion of the scholar and those who follow that opinion.

The intention with which the image was created

The majority understands the warning issued by the Messenger, Peace be upon him, in the narration to refer to the one who created the image/idol with an intention of either worshiping the idol himself, or for the idol to be worshiped by others. Another interpretation suggested that it refers to onwe who creates an image with an intention of competing with Allah in His creation. Both instances are cases of disbelief, and the action would therefore remove the person from the fold.

If however, the image-maker did not create the three or two dimensional image with an intention of worship, or to compete with Allah in His creation, then he is merely considered sinful in the first instance according to Khattabi, and in both instances according to others.

Thus it is clear, that the artist who created sculptures for the sake of art – not for worship or competing with Allah in His creation, is not out of the fold of Islam. He may be sinful, but this does not mean that we should not pray salah upon him when he dies, or bury him in the graveyard of the believers. Had this been the case, we should not be praying upon or burying in the Muslim graveyards, most Muslims on the face of the earth, who all engage regularly in the disobedience of Allah.

May Allah protect us all from sin, make us from those who are close to Him, and grant us all beautiful endings, Amin.

And Allah knows best.
Abdurragmaan Khan

p.s. image-making in the above answer refers to images of creation bearing souls, such as animals and human beings.

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan


Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Giving Zakat to an Adult Son.

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

I have only one child who is in an adult.

Due some personal issues he faced he is in huge debts. His income exceeds his monthly expenses which further increases his debts and he I am afraid he is suffering from major depression as a result.

Am I allowed to pay Zakat for him?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

Thank you for your question.

You are correct that your adult son who enjoys his own income is not your dependent by agreement of the scholars. In addition, the fact that he is your son does not disqualify him from receiving zakah from you. Consequently, it would be permissible for you to pay from your Zakah to your son so that he may settle his debt.

قال النووي في المجموع 6/223 : (وأما إذا كان الولد أو الوالد فقيراً أو مسكيناً وقلنا في بعض الأحوال لا تجب نفقته فيجوز لوالده وولده دفع الزكاة إليه من سهم الفقراء والمساكين بلا خلاف؛ لأنه حينئذٍ كالأجنبي). انتهى

In his Majmu, Imam Nawawi said, “If the son or father is poor, and the circumstance is such that nafaqah (maintenance) is not compulsory upon the father or son respectively, then it would be permitted for one to pay his zakah – from the share of the poor or needy – to the other by agreement.

And Allah knows best

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Du’as and Disbelief

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

During wudu, time for prayer was running out and I kept getting whispers concerning if I’ve washed a part properly and such. I said “ oh Allah, don’t let shaytan win”. Now this was entailed to me obliviously. Is this kufr?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

Shukran for your question

The prayer you made in no way denotes disbelief. Shaytan is our enemy. Allah said this clearly in the Quran. Accordingly, he is determined to lead us astray and wishes for our destruction. Asking Allah not to let him win or overpower us is a good prayer. O Allah grant us victory of shaytan and his armies.

That being said, waswasah is something that should not be ignored. You have to address it and work towards its removal. Please read this answer and implement the advices.

May Allah guide and protect us all, Amin.

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.