A Ramadan Reader: A Comprehensive Answers Guide to Getting the Most Out of Ramadan

Preparing for Ramadan

The Complete Guide to Fasting

Imam Tahir’s 5 Simple Steps to Prepare for Ramadan

Preparing For Ramadan Advice from Habib Umar bin Hafiz

Ramadan Detox‬‏ for a Healthy Ramadan

40 Hadiths on Ramadan

Tarawih

Can I Pray 8 Rakats for Tarawih?

Should We Stop Praying Tarawih Once the Qur’an is Completed?

Is it Necessary to Perform Tarawih Prayers in the Mosque?

Is it Obligatory to Complete the Entire Qur’an During Tarawih Prayers?

Performing Tarawih Prayers Again as an Imam

Is It Valid for a Child to Lead Tarawih?

The Ruling of the Tarawih Prayer: A Confirmed Sunna

Reciting From a Copy of the Qur’an (Mushaf) in Tarawih and Other Prayers

Expiatory Payment (Fidya) for Missed Ramadan Fasts

Brief Overview of Expiatory Payments (fidya) for Missed Ramadan Fasts

Feeding People to Expiate For a Corrupted Fast

Is Expiation (kaffara) Necessary For Not Fasting in Ramadan?

When Is Expiation Required For A Fast?

How Many Expiations Are Required For Multiple Broken Fasts?

Can My Sister Pay Expiatory Payments (fidya) For Missed Fasts Due To Her Diabetes?

Can I Pay Fidya for Missed Days of Fasting Due to Menses?

Can a Healthy Person Skip Prayer and Fasting and Pay Expiation?

The Expiation (Kaffara) for Having Sex While Fasting

Must I Fast 180 Days as Expiation for 3 Broken Fasts?

Things that Break the Fast

Principles on what invalidates the fast

Does Watching Pornography While Fasting Break One’s Fast

Using Creams, Powders, or Topical Medications While Fasting

Does Swallowing Phlegm Break Your Fast?

Vaseline On Lips While Fasting, and Hitting Kids

Applying Medicine to One’s Teeth: Does it Invalidate the Fast?

Ramadan: Injections, Eye Drops, And Doubts

Using Chapstick While Fasting

Accidental & Forgetful Breaking of the Fast: What Is the Difference?

What Corrupts a Fast: Questions About Water Entering the Body

Bleeding Gums While Fasting

The Effect of Smoking on Fasting, and the Effect of Sins on Faith

Using Asthma Medication: Is My Fast Invalidated?

Accidentally Inhaling Perfume While Fasting

Does breathing in Air break one’s Fast?

Passionate Kissing While Fasting

Fasting and Illness

Too Sick to Fast in Ramadan, Too Poor to Pay the Expiatory Payment (Fidya)

Long-Term Illness that Prevents Fasting

How Can I Benefit From Ramadan When I Can’t Fast Due to Being Ill?

Laylat al-Qadr

When is Laylat al-Qadr?

Worship & Prayer on Laylat al-Qadr

Making Up Missed Fasts

Making Up Missed Fasts and Illness

Can I Combine My Intentions for a Missed Ramadan Fast and An Optional Sunnah Fast?

Do I Have To Make Up Missed Fasts Within A Year?

Making up Obligatory Fasts and Prayers

Making of Missed Fast

Years of Missed Fasts and Expiation (kaffara)

Breaking One’s Fast/Not Fasting Due to Hardship

Breaking One’s Fast Due to Weakness & Migraines

Can I Break My Fast If My Job Makes Fasting Too Difficult?

Fasting in Extreme Latitudes

Attending Juma, Praying and Fasting While Training to be a Firefighter

Can I Break My Fast If My Job Makes Fasting Too Difficult?

Fasting and Pregnancy

Pregnant Women & Fasting

Pregnancy & Making Up Fasts: Does She Really Have To?

The Spiritual Retreat (I`tikaf)

The Spiritual Retreat (i`tikaf)

The Three Types of I’tikaf (Spiritual Retreat)

Ramadan Advice, Benefits and Inspiration

Worship in Ramadan For a Menstruating Woman

How Do I Make The Most Of Ramadan?

Fasting Its Principles and Virtues-Imam Ghazali from al-Arab’in

Inner Dimensions of Fasting-Imam Ghazali

The Spiritual Purpose of Fasting – Closeness to Allah

Practical Tips for Fasting During Ramadan

Work Ethics for Muslims Fasting During Ramadan

Prophetic Supplications for Fasting

Virtues of Fasting in the Summer

Health Benefits of Fasting, and the Maximum Recommended Fast

General Ramadan Answers

When and Where Do I Break My Fast on a 20 Hour Airline Flight?

Should I Feel Bad for Not Fasting When I Had to Travel?

At What Age Must One Start Fasting?

Eating After Dawn & Breaking The Fast For An Invitation

The Chaining of Shayateen (Devils) During Ramadan

Does Each Makeup Prayer During Ramadan Count as 70 Makeup Prayers?

Intercourse during the month of Ramadan

Is Your Ramadan Fast Still Valid If You Stop Eating and Make Your Intention to Fast Between Fajr and Islamic Midday?

Should I Feel Bad for Not Fasting When I Had to Travel?

Brief Miscellaneous Q & A Relating to Fasting

Newlyweds Having Intercourse While Fasting During Ramadan

Missing Exams and Friday Prayer Due to the COVID-19

Answered by Ustadha Shazia Ahmad

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Due to the recent outbreak of the coronavirus, my mother has become very ‘over-protective’; she is not letting me attend the Friday prayer. What should I do? Furthermore, in a few months, I am going to be sitting my exams (once this time and in another 2 years)- these are exams for which I have been learning content for almost 2 whole years- some of these exams are taking place when the Friday prayer happens. What should I do? I cannot find anyone to carry it out personally. Also, if I do find someone in the near future, can you provide me with the minimum khutbah to be said.

Answer: Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for your question. This recent outbreak has had everybody on edge and rightly so. Your mother is correct that her life will be put at risk if you venture outside unnecessarily as people over 60 can succumb to the disease. The speed with which this virus is spreading is shocking and we are all responsible for doing our part in order to protect others around us.

In the current climate, it is not obligatory to pray the Friday prayer, instead, you can pray dhuhr at home. I believe by now, many Friday prayers around the world have already been canceled. Please see these links:

Guidance on the Coronavirus & Attending the Mosque
The Shafiʿi School On Friday Prayer and Congregational Prayer During Epidemics
Can I Perform Friday Prayer (Jum’a) at Home During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

Considering that schools and non-essential businesses have been suspended in many countries, I am certain that your exam has been delayed by the school or organization. If not, I would call them and tell them that you will need to re-schedule the exam until the danger of the virus as passed. Generally, everything is on hold except for the absolutely urgent. In the US, SAT exams have been delayed and others I am sure.

I ask that Allah protect everyone from this epidemic, and make it a means for us to remember who we are, why we are here and Whom we will return to.

Wassalam,
[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterwards, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Playing Chess

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

My son is very strong in playing chess.Can we let him play chess in tournaments? What about tournaments where there is prize money for a winner?
Can we use this money? What about making it as career?

Answer: Wa alaykum salam

Thank you for your question.

All the schools of law agree that if playing chess leads to one of the following, it is haram or impermissible to play it:

1. gambling
2. any indecency
3. neglecting prayer by delaying it beyond its allotted time
4. a state of heedlessness of Allah.

Even if these evils are absent, scholars still differ about the permissibility or impermissibility of chess. The Shafi’i school is possibly the most lenient in this regard. Imam Nawawi mentions two positions in his various works, namely the official view that it is makruh or reprehensible to play chess and another view that it is permissible (Rawdah al-Talibin). Please note that, in a broad sense, ‘makruh’ is regarded as a lesser form of permissibility than ‘permissible’.

In his Tuhfah, ibn Hajar al-Haytami says regarding the narrations that prohibit the playing of chess and the like,

“However, Hafiz ibn Hajar al-Asqalani said, “not a single tradition has been transmitted through an authentic or sound transmission. In addition, a number of the senior companions and many successors (tabi’in) played it. From among those who played it was (the great scholar) Sa’id ibn Jubayr, may Allah be pleased with him.”

In conclusion, if your son is able to maintain a balance such that the game does not consume him and he does not become negligent of his Creator, Allah, glory be to Him, then the playing of chess will be permissible – makruh according to the official view and simply permissible according to the non-official view.

And Allah knows best

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Is it Disbelief to Draw Pictures?

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

I was told that we cannot pray for a muslim who has died or allow them to buried in a muslim graveyard if they are known to have made sculptures in this life. Are muslim image makers outside of Islam and eternally punished as those who commit shirk are?

Answer: Wa alaykum salam

Shukran for your question.

The primary narrations related to your question were transmitted by Imams Bukhari and Muslim. They are:

“The most severely punished people on the Day of Judgement will be image-makers.”

“Those who make images will be punished on the Day of Judgement and it will be said to them, ‘Give life to what you have created.’”

Thereafter, scholars differed regarding the meanings of these reports. In his Fath al-Bari, ibn Hajar has a lengthy discussion from which the following are important to consider.

Taswir or image-making

Some scholars like Khattabi, considered the image-making mentioned in the narrations above to refer specifically to three dimensional images. The majority however, including Imam Nawawi, considered the warning to apply to both three and two dimensional images.

What is important to consider here is that scholars differed, and while one may subscribe to a certain opinion, the views of our scholars demands our respect. Our respect for the opinion of the scholar and those who follow that opinion.

The intention with which the image was created

The majority understands the warning issued by the Messenger, Peace be upon him, in the narration to refer to the one who created the image/idol with an intention of either worshiping the idol himself, or for the idol to be worshiped by others. Another interpretation suggested that it refers to onwe who creates an image with an intention of competing with Allah in His creation. Both instances are cases of disbelief, and the action would therefore remove the person from the fold.

If however, the image-maker did not create the three or two dimensional image with an intention of worship, or to compete with Allah in His creation, then he is merely considered sinful in the first instance according to Khattabi, and in both instances according to others.

Thus it is clear, that the artist who created sculptures for the sake of art – not for worship or competing with Allah in His creation, is not out of the fold of Islam. He may be sinful, but this does not mean that we should not pray salah upon him when he dies, or bury him in the graveyard of the believers. Had this been the case, we should not be praying upon or burying in the Muslim graveyards, most Muslims on the face of the earth, who all engage regularly in the disobedience of Allah.

May Allah protect us all from sin, make us from those who are close to Him, and grant us all beautiful endings, Amin.

And Allah knows best.
Abdurragmaan Khan

p.s. image-making in the above answer refers to images of creation bearing souls, such as animals and human beings.

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan


Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Giving Zakat to an Adult Son.

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

I have only one child who is in an adult.

Due some personal issues he faced he is in huge debts. His income exceeds his monthly expenses which further increases his debts and he I am afraid he is suffering from major depression as a result.

Am I allowed to pay Zakat for him?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

Thank you for your question.

You are correct that your adult son who enjoys his own income is not your dependent by agreement of the scholars. In addition, the fact that he is your son does not disqualify him from receiving zakah from you. Consequently, it would be permissible for you to pay from your Zakah to your son so that he may settle his debt.

قال النووي في المجموع 6/223 : (وأما إذا كان الولد أو الوالد فقيراً أو مسكيناً وقلنا في بعض الأحوال لا تجب نفقته فيجوز لوالده وولده دفع الزكاة إليه من سهم الفقراء والمساكين بلا خلاف؛ لأنه حينئذٍ كالأجنبي). انتهى

In his Majmu, Imam Nawawi said, “If the son or father is poor, and the circumstance is such that nafaqah (maintenance) is not compulsory upon the father or son respectively, then it would be permitted for one to pay his zakah – from the share of the poor or needy – to the other by agreement.

And Allah knows best

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Du’as and Disbelief

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

During wudu, time for prayer was running out and I kept getting whispers concerning if I’ve washed a part properly and such. I said “ oh Allah, don’t let shaytan win”. Now this was entailed to me obliviously. Is this kufr?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

Shukran for your question

The prayer you made in no way denotes disbelief. Shaytan is our enemy. Allah said this clearly in the Quran. Accordingly, he is determined to lead us astray and wishes for our destruction. Asking Allah not to let him win or overpower us is a good prayer. O Allah grant us victory of shaytan and his armies.

That being said, waswasah is something that should not be ignored. You have to address it and work towards its removal. Please read this answer and implement the advices.

May Allah guide and protect us all, Amin.

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Is Whistling Qur’an Disbelief?

Answered by Ustadha Shazia Ahmad

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I accidentally whistled Qur’an (fatihah) with no ill intention. Did I make kufr or mock the Qur`an? I stopped immediately and asked for forgiveness. Should I make ghusl to re-enter Islam and will all my previous prayers be accepted? I was having severe waswasa.

Answer: Assalamu alaykum,

AlhamduliLlah, you have not committed disbelief (kufr) nor mocked the Qur`an. You had no ill intention.

This could be considered bad adab towards the Qur`an, because disbelievers in the Prophet’s time used to whistle to distract people from hearing the Qur`an, and whistling is generally a custom of non-Muslims.

It is a good to stop a whistling habit, as it is loud and annoying and not befitting to refined good character.

There is no need to perform a ghusl, and all of your previous prayers should be fine. Ignore your baseless misgivings (waswasa) and ask Allah to protect you from all bad unIslamic habits. See the link below for more information.

Is Whistling Permitted?

Wassalam,
[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterwards, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Can I Give a Muslim a Silver Necklace?

Answered by Ustadha Shazia Ahmad

Question:

I am a Christian American and want to understand some Shafi’i Muslim customs. I have a friend who is Kurdish, Shafi`i Muslim and lives in Turkey. Can I send her a gift of a silver necklace with a small pendant holding an opal, and two diamond chips? Is this something allowed in her religion?

Answer: Thank you for your question. Yes, it is permissible for you to give her such a gift, as Muslim women are allowed to wear any precious metals and jewels. I pray that Allah increases you in every good and preserves your friendship with your friend in Turkey! Please don’t hesitate to ask any further questions that you may have.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterwards, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Friday Prayer [Shafi’i]

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Is the Friday Prayer (Jumua) a communal obligation or a personal obligation?

Answer: Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

Jumua is obligatory for every male Muslim who has reached puberty and is not excused from the Friday Prayer, such as someone who is sick. (Minhaj al-Talibin, Nawawi)

This means that it is personal obligation, and not merely a communal obligation. If it was merely a communal obligation, it would not be obligatory for every male to go as long as some went.

The Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) said, ‘To pray the Friday Prayer in a group is an obligation and is incumbent upon every Muslim except for four: a bondsman who is owned, a woman, a child, and a sick person.’ (Abu Dawud)

ّI pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed. 

Medical Treatment and Sin

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

As a doctor, is it halal to provide and advertise medical treatment that would frequently allow others to persist in committing sins? For example, PrEP which protects patients who are at high risk for getting HIV?

Answer: Bismillahi al Rahman al Rahim.

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

Given that such treatment provided is not exclusive to people commiting sin, and that it does not directly facilitate sin for them, it is permissible.

Fuller Answer:

Assisting in Sin

Allah Most High says, ‘And help one another in [all sorts of] good and in fearing Allah, and do not help one another in sin and transgression.’ (Qur’an, 5:2)

And the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) said, ‘May Allah curse wine, the one who drinks it, the one who pours it, him who sells it, the one who buys it, the one who presses it, the one for whom it is pressed, the one who delivers it, and the one for whom it is delivered!’ (Abu Dawud)

Among many other primary texts, the verse and hadith above clearly show that Allah has not merely forbidden us from committing sin, but has also forbidding us from assisting in sin.

There is however a difference between directly facilitating sin, and indirectly facilitating sin.

To give some examples, in the Shafi’i school, it is forbidden to sell arms to people involved in killing Muslims, but it is not forbidden to sell them steel, because it may well be used for something else. Similarly, selling grapes to some who may possibly make wine is offensive, and not sinful, whereas selling it to someone who will definitely make wine is sinful. (Rawdat al Talibin, Nawawi)

Similarly, it is forbidden in the Shafi’i school to serve food to non-Muslims during the daytime in Ramadan, because it is considered helping them not fast, which is a sin. (Tuhfat al Muhtaj, Ibn Hajr al Haytami)

So the principle in the Shafi’i school is that when the means definitely leads to a sinful end, it is sinful. Otherwise, it is just better to avoid.

For examples in the Hanafi school (which is actually sometimes more lenient), please see this answer.

Career Choices

We all have to earn a living, and it is actually a good idea in our day and age to earn a lot of money. (Please see this video )

When Imam Muhammad ibn Hasan al Shaybani was asked to write a book on abstinence in the world [zuhd], he rolled up his sleeves and wrote a book on earning money. There is a clear message behind what he did.

At the same time, when possible we should try to work in a way that kills two birds with one stone: paying the bills and doing something that is in keeping with the higher goals of the Sacred Law.

In view of this, if you feel that a lot of your work is basically helping people live a sexually promiscuous life, I’d tried and find another speciality or focus in your same line of work.

A Common Word

As you mentioned in your question, things are pretty hard in the current climate. It is very difficult, and indeed very dangerous, for Muslims as a minority to try and battle against every little evil in society.

That said, just as Allah commands us to come to ‘a common word’ with the Jews and Christians concerning matters of creed (Qur’an, 3:64), we should also try and work with Jews, Christians, and anyone else who shares our common values of family and traditional gender relationships, to make a change.

By doing so, inshaAllah, we can try to push back the tide that is threatening the countries and communities that we live in.

We can work with others in our respective countries in a peaceful, respectful and democratic way to voice our opinions on cases like Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission and work for change.

To not do anything at all is cowardice; to try to do it on our own is quixotic.

Advertising

How you advertise these services is also relevant. If you just let any old outreach team work on the images and wordings, you may well find that they are directly targeting gay couples as customers. This would of course not be permissible.

Conclusion

The treatments are halal as they are not directly instrumental to sin. However, if you feel that a lot of your work is effectively helping patients persist in sin, you should look for another field of work.

Please also see this answer.

I pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed.