Nasheed Hub: Talama Ashku Gharami

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Talama Ashku Gharami

Talama Ashku Gharami, or “How Long Will My Heart Ache,” is a heartfelt Nasheed that may can relate to. One of the less-appreciated poems, it speaks directly to the soul.

The author is experiencing heartache. However, it is not a wordly or romantic pain. Rather than wishing for a loved one, he is longing for the ultimate goal; to attain unto Allah, and see the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace.

He asks when his pain will stop, saying, “How long will my heart ache for my Beloved?” He addresses the Prophet as the one from Tiham (an area that includes the cities of Mecca and Medina). He goes on, speaking about his utmost desire to attain the vision, and see the door of Paradise. He concludes by asking Allah, to grant goodness with goodness.
[pdf-embedder url=”https://seekersguidance.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/talama.pdf”]

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilizations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Resources for Seekers

 

Nasheed Hub: Bushra Lana

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of Nasheed or Islamic devotional songs.

Bushra Lana (Good News)

We don’t know what good news inspired the author to write this nasheed. However, Bushra Lana described attainting “our highest wish,” whereby all troubles end and wellbeing and joy comes forth.

We can only wonder what the author experienced. The safe return of a loved one thought to be lost for good? Some knowledge that was implemented allowed the author to be propelled to new heights? A vision of the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace? A spiritual connection to Allah, a lifting of veils?

We may assume that the author saw the Prophet in a vision. The song continues, telling the soul about the enjoyment of meeting, and telling the eye that it will seek comfort soon, all through the beauty of the Chosen One.

Click the image below to scroll.

[pdf-embedder url=”https://seekersguidance.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/bushra-lana.pdf” title=”bushra lana”]

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilizations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Resources for Seekers

Nasheed Hub: Ya Arham al-Rahimeen

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Ya Arham al-Rahimeen

Ya Arham al-Rahimeen (O Most Merciful of Those Who Show Mercy) is a very unique nasheed. It is in the form of a long, beautifully complex prayer, and it calls on Allah to help the believers in their time of need.

It begins by calling on Allah through His Blessed Names: The Generous, the Merciful, the Clement, The Powerful, and Mighty. The singers recognize that they have no one but Allah, and no salvation except for their Lord. They then ask Allah to send them a righteous leader that they can follow, rather than being forced to follow a corrupt one. They hope for a leader who abolishes evil, enjoins the good, and removes distress.

The singers would then go on to ask for other things to alleviate their suffering. They ask for beneficial rainfalls that continue throughout the years, forgiveness from sins and a good ending.

Click the image below to scroll.

[pdf-embedder url=”https://seekersguidance.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/Ya-arham-al-rahimeen.pdf” title=”Ya arham al rahimeen”]

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilizations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Resources for Seekers

Nasheed Hub: Qasidah Muhammadiya

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersGuidance Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Qasidah Muhammadiya

Qasida Muhammadiya (The Muhammadan Ode) is a wonderful example of both linguistic eloquence and heartfelt love. It was written by Imam Busiri, the same poet who wrote the famous “Qasida Burda,” or the Poem of the Cloak. This poem is written in a very formal verse style that does not take away from the sincerity of the meaning.

Each verse praised the Prophet in a different way, in a very standardized way. Each verse begins with the name “Muhammad” and continues praising his various virtues. The word after the name, begins with the first letter of the Arabic letter. In the same way, the rest of the poem continues, first beginning with the blessed name of the Prophet, and then the next letter of the Arabic alphabet.

Click the image below to scroll

[pdf-embedder url=”https://seekersguidance.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/qasidah-muhamadiya.pdf” title=”qasidah muhamadiya”]

 

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilizations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.

Resources for Seekers

Nasheed Hub: Tala‘al Badru Alayna

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Tala’al Badru Alayna

Tala’al Badru Alayna (The Full Moon Rose Over Us) is the oldest nasheed recorded in the Islamic tradition. It is a beautiful expression of love and yearning for the Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him.

Picture this scene: for days, the people of Medina have been anxiously awaiting the arrival of the Prophet. Every day, they have gone to the outskirts of the city to watch and wait.

One day, they set out and wait all morning, then retire in the blazing midday heat. Before long, they hear a man on his rooftop calling out, telling them that he sees two men on the horizon.

The people come running, and they burst out into this song:

Click on the image below to scroll

[pdf-embedder url=”https://seekersguidance.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Tala-al-badru.pdf” title=”Tala al badru”]

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilizations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Resources for Seekers

 

Nasheed Hub: Qad Kafani

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Qad Kafani

Qad Kafani Ilm Rabbi (My Lord’s Knowledge Has Sufficed Me)  is a beautiful nasheed, written by the great Imam al-Haddad in the 17th century. It takes the singer to a journey from neediness to fulfillment, and connection to Allah. The author begins by expressing his need to his Lord. He prays for his need to be fulfilled, while using the symbolism of a door to express that he is waiting for Allah’s answer. He knows that Allah is All-Knowing, and knows all his worries and fears. He is supplicating to his Lord to express his need and humility.

Halfway through the poem, the singer senses a feeling of desperation. Either the author is losing hope, or his circumstances are getting worse and worse. He asks Allah to bring aid swiftly, before he runs out of patience.

A few line later, the tone changes. He attains realization, he says, through his brokenness and poverty. He realizes that the important thing isn’t so much his needs being met, but that he stays at the door of Allah.

Sometimes your salvation won’t be through your sucess, it will be through your seeking.

Click on the image below to scroll
[pdf-embedder url=”https://seekersguidance.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/qad-kafani-1.pdf” title=”qad kafani”]

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilizations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Resources for Seekers

 

Nasheed Hub: Ya Imam al Rusli

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersGuidance Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Ya Imam al Rusli-O Leader of the Messengers

“Ya Imam al Rusli,” is a nasheed with origins in the Levantine tradition. The writer expresses his need for the Prophet’s guidance as he, Allah bless him and give him peace, is his connection to Allah. He refers to the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace, as “the door to Allah, and the one on whom I depend,” and asks him to take him by the hand.

He continues by mentioning the Prophet’s virtues, Allah bless him and give him peace. He speaks about his care and guardianship for all people, and his vast knowledge.

The author also used various examples and metaphors to express his love and longing. He swears by the falling star, to equate the knower of the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace, as someone who is in good health, as opposed to someone who doesn’t know him, who he compares to someone who is ill.

Click on the image below to scroll

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilizations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.

These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.

These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.

This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.

Resources for Seekers