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Inscription Of The Prophet

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Salams, I bought a hat that has a print that I thought was a general ancient ottoman painting. I did some research and apparently the print is actually a 14th-century picture depiction of the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace, with facial features shown. How do I dispose of it?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

I pray you are well.

There is no specific, prescribed manner of disposing of the hat. The image is not a likeness of the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace, despite the intention of the artist. You can dispose of it as you wish.

It’s unfortunate that people have tried to imitate the likeness of the Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace. Firstly due to it being impermissible for many reasons; one of them being the door of disrespecting him is opened thereby. Please refer to this answer for more information.

Secondly, because no matter how skilled they were they would always fall short of describing him. Or as Ibn al Farid, the Sultan of the Lovers, said, “Despite the expertise of those who describe his beauty, time will come to an end with much in him left undescribed.”

May Allah fills our hearts with love and veneration for him, Allah bless him and grant him peace. Amin

[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 where, for 18 months, he studied with erudite scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish, and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish. In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years in Sacred Law (fiqh), legal theory (Usul al-fiqh), theology, hadith methodology, hadith commentary, and Logic with teachers such as Dr. Ashraf Muneeb, Dr. Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr. Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr. Mansur Abu Zina, and others. He was also given licenses of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabir and Shaykh Yahya Qandil. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic sciences, tafsir, Arabic grammar, and Arabic eloquence.

Clothes of The People of the Land

Shaykh Farid Dingle answers the question of wearing jeans as opposed to wearing jubbas in relation to modesty and prayer.

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I wanted to know about wearing certain clothes, I am 18 years old and live in the UK, I wear a Jubba everyday and pray in it and find it comfortable compared to other clothes for prayer, however I sometimes feel a bit embarrassed wearing a jubba outside sometimes, I also study Islam, one of my friends and fellow student doesn’t like me always wearing a Jubba in a sense, he even said to me that if you want to be accessible to people, wear the clothes that they wear.

Now based on this, I would tend to wear jeans whenever wearing other clothes, I don’t particularly like other types of pants, what i find about jeans is that, even though they may not be like skin-tight jeans, when sitting down in the tashahhud position they do tighten up to the skin, I think from what I have read that this may be makruh, I think many jeans would be like this,

Could you please advise about what to do in my situation, I do feel embarrassed at times wearing a jubba and also i am not sure about wearing jeans (even if they are loose they may still tighten up), could you pleased tell me the ruling about wearing such clothes as well as the fact that I am young so I wouldn’t wear a suit pant style, like most older people tend to,

Is it best for me to carry on wearing my jubbas? Is it allowed for me to wear clothes like people around me, even if they can become tight in certain prayer positions?

Jazak Allah khayr.

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Clothes fulfill a number Sharia countenanced goals which I shall try to detail as follows.

Covering Oneself

The first and foremost is covering your nakedness, which is an obligation, and part of this is the covering of shape and form of the area between your navel and your knee. Clothes that show the shape of this area (like tight emo trousers) are un-Islamic.

Avoiding Sin

Another almost equally important goal is reducing avoidable attraction from the opposite sex. Showing off one’s vanity muscles is forbidden, not just because it constitutes pride, but almost because it can be a temptation to some women. The is nothing wrong with sex or sexual attraction in Islam, but it just has its place and time, and that is not the street.

Self-expression

We all know the maxim “You are what you eat.” This is often true regarding clothes too.

What we choose to buy and wear is a form of self-expression: people dress like they are businessmen because they want to show that they are effective people who achieve; people also dress like they are ‘straight outta Compton’ or ‘too cool for school’, then that is exactly what they are feeling inside and what they want to be seen as.

For this reason, the Prophet, blessings and peace be upon him, said, “Whosoever drags/wears anything out of pride, Allah will not so much as look at on the Day of Rising.” (Bukhari and Muslim) This applies to how you dress, what you drive, and how you carry yourself in general.

Message

What you wear is also a message, be it a good, bad, or neutral message. And this is very important. Wherever you are and in whichever setting you find yourself, the way you dress sends intended and unintended messages.

In the Middle East, for example, wearing a red hat with a white turban usually means, ‘I am a religious scholar so ask me questions.’ This will affect the behavior and reactions of those around such a person, and will affect how their words and actions are received.

This is true for a Muslim in the West, and for this reason we have to be careful about what exactly the messages are that we wish to convey. This is what you friend is talking about.

For example, are you trying to install awe in others, such that they see you as a ‘man of the cloth’, from a Christian perspective, or as ‘foreign and Eastern’? Are you trying to lead other Muslims to hold tighter to the ‘outward’ signs of religiosity, or are you trying to show them that you are more than they? These are all possibilities that you must think about with regards to your own intention, and with regards to what effect you might be having on other people, and no one can tell you the best thing to do but yourself.

The Upshot

Wear clean and smart clothes that are concealing of the area between your navel and knees, and then choose based on the above discussions whether you should dress Eastern or Western, or whether you should dress like a scholar or a average religious Muslim.

I am personally a big advocate of the wearing a Muslim-looking hat: I find that it almost a statement to oneself that one is a practicing Muslim, and it is also a way of giving emotional and religious support to sisters in the West who are having a hard time keeping the hijab.

And Allah knows best.

I pray this helps.

Farid

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


Is the Prayer Valid If One Prays in Impure Clothes Without Knowing It?

Answered by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Is the prayer valid if one prays in impure clothes but had no clue of them being impure at that time?

Does one have to repeat all of those prayers?
Answer:  Walaikum assalam,

I hope you’re doing well, insha’Allah.

The base assumption of all objects is that they are pure, unless certainly established otherwise. Likewise, the base assumption of all actions is validity, unless certainly established otherwise. [Ala’ al-Din Abidin, al-Hadiyya al-`Ala’iyya; Tahtawi/Shurunbulali, Hashiyat Maraqi al-Falah; Ibn Abidin, Radd al-Muhtar]

Hold fast to those two assumptions; assume that your clothes were pure (or, if there was impurity, it was excusable)—and that your past prayers were valid. Ignore doubts.

Be grateful to Allah Most High for the blessing of ease in religion. Allah Most High tells us, “And He has placed no hardship for you in religion.” [Qur’an, 22.78]

Please see: Key Principles Relating to Certainty, Doubt, and Baseless Misgivings (waswasa)
And Allah is the giver of success and facilitation.

[Shaykh] Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Faraz Rabbani is a scholar and researcher of Islamic law and Executive Director of SeekersHub Global After ten years overseas, Shaykh Faraz returned to Canada in the Summer of 2007. In May 2008 he founded SeekersHub Global to deal with the urgent need to spread Islamic knowledge—both online and on the ground—in a reliable, relevant, inspiring, and accessible manner. He has been repeatedly listed as one of the world’s 500 most influential Muslims (The Muslim500).

Is It Permissible to Recite the Qur’an in Impure Clothes?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

Is it permissible to recite the Qur’an in impure clothes?

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

Yes, it is permissible to recite the Qur’an whilst wearing clothing that is ritually impure. But this is contrary to proper manners (adab) with the Qur’an as being in such an undignified state is unbecoming for the one beholding the Divine Address.

Allah Most High says, “And whosoever venerates God’s waymarks, that is of the godliness of the hearts.” [22:32]

This is when you have a choice. In cases of difficulty, you are only responsible to the extent of your ability. The intention of the slave is greater than his action, said the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace).

Please also see: Etiquette of Reading and Handling the Qur’an and: Why is There so much Concern with ‘Manners’ (Adab) in Islam?

And Allah Most High alone knows best.

wassalam,
[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.

Is It Acceptable to Wear Clothes With Allah’s Name on It?

Answered by Ustadh Salman Younas

Question: I am a football player. I would love to see my name “Habibullah” written on my jersey.

1. Is it acceptable for me to wear my jersey into the toilet since it has Allah’s name on it?

2. Will I be responsible if others who buys my jersey wear it into the toilet?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum

1. The basic rule is that it would be disliked to enter the toilet, which is defined here specifically as the area where one relieves himself, while wearing something with the name “Allah” or a Qur’anic verse and the like.

This dislikedness is lifted though when one covers the name or verse before entering the toilet. Yet, even here it would be best to avoid entering with such names/verses if reasonably possible.

2. You will not be responsible and such a possibility does not render it impermissible for you to put your full name on a jersey but what you mention is certainly something to keep in mind as any Muslim would not wish to see the name of Allah disrespected.

You can always, for example, choose to simply have the name “Habib” on your jersey as opposed to “Habib Allah.”

[Ibn Nujaym, Bahr al-Ra’iq (1:256); Ibn Abidin, Hashiya (6:361); Ibn Qudama, al-Mughni (1:109)]

[Ustadh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Salman Younas   graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman where he spent five years studying Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Oxford and continues his traditional studies with scholars in the United Kingdom.

Can I Pray Behind Someone Who Is Wearing Transparent Clothes?

Answered by Ustadh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

I have many doubts regarding my prayerswhen I pray behind an Imam wearing transparent clothes. When are clothes deemed transparent?

If the Imam wears such clothes, should a pray behind him? Should I repeat the prayer?

Answer: assalamu alaykum

Covering one’s nakedness (awra) is a condition for the validity of prayer.

In the case of men, this minimally entails covering the area extending from the navel up to and including the knees in such a manner that the color of one’s skin is not apparent to an onlooker.

If one is wearing clothing that reveals the color of the skin of a quarter of a limb within the area defined above as nakedness, the prayer would not be valid. As for the color of the skin of other parts of the body being apparent, it does not effect the validity of the prayer.

You should note that what is meant by the color of the skin being visible/apparent refers to it being so in normal circumstances i.e. the actual color (white, brown, dark etc.) is clearly visible to an onlooker looking at someone in normal circumstances. If the color of the skin is only visible if one is looking extremely closely or from near proximity, or the actual color of skin is not clearly visible, or it is only visible under a bright light and the like, then this will not effect the validity of the prayer. One may pray behind such an Imam.

[al-Halabi, Ghunya al-mutamalli (214); al-Shurunbulali, Imdad al-Fattah (213)]

[Ustadh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Salman Younas graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman. There he studies Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir.

How Should I Clean My Clothes and My Body to Be Allowed to Pray?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

1. I have put impure clothes in a bucket with pure clothes. Afterwards I wash them with water. Are my clothes now pure?

2. Is it compulsory to use the hand when washing the private parts in the toilet?

3. Is it necessary to wash the rear private part during the ritual bath?

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

1. Yes, your clothes are deemed purified. If there are no signs of filth, there is no filth transfer.

2. No, it is not obligatory to wash your private parts because cleaning those areas (istinja’) is a sunna.

3. Yes, it is a sunna to clean your private parts before bathing.

Please see: A Reader on Waswasa (Baseless Misgivings) and: The Ritual Bath (ghusl): Obligatory, Recommended, and Disliked

And Allah Most High alone knows best.

wassalam,
[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.

Can I Wear the Same Clothes I Was Wearing Before Performing a Ghusl (Ritual Bath)?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

Can I wear the same clothes I was wearing before performing a ghusl (ritual bath)?

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

Yes, you can wear the same clothes, namely, the clothes you became ritually impure in, after the bath. But you should remove any filth first before praying in them.

And Allah Most High alone knows best.

[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.

Does Washing Filthy Clothes With Pure Clothes Entail That All My Clothes Are Impure?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

I am struggling to go back to the straight path.

Does washing filthy clothes with pure clothes entail that all my clothes are impure? Does it entail that all the items of my house are impure?

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

If an item of clothing comes out of the washing machine without any clearly distinguishable traces of filth, it is deemed pure.

Consequently, you should focus more on renewing your faith, fulfilling your current and past obligations, and resolving to leave your past completely.

Please also see: Washing Filthy Clothing in the Washing Machine and: Are My Pants and Washing Machine Filthy? and: How Do I Wash My Clothes Properly to Ensure That Filth Doesn’t Spread?

Consider taking the following free class at SeekersHub: Absolute Essentials of Islam: Basic Hanafi Jurisprudence (STEP)

And Allah Most High alone knows best.

[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.

Does the Sunna Entail Dressing as the People of the Land I Live In?

Answered by Ustadh Salman Younas

Question: Is there such a thing as sunnah form of dress? Some speakers advocate that the dress of the land is closer to the sunnah than the supposed sunnah dress. What form of clothing is closest to sunnah for people living in the west?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum

The statement that the sunna way of dressing is to adopt the dress of one’s land is sound. It is also accurate to state that the sunna was to wear a turban, a loin cloth, sandals, and the like.

Different Understandings of ‘Sunna’

Both statements mentioned in the question are accurate in so far as they appeal to one or another of the meanings of the term ‘sunna’.

Linguistically, the sunna is defined as a path that is traversed. In the technical usage of jurists, the sunna is that which the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) performed persistently without prohibiting its non-performance.

The sunna in its technical meaning is subdivided into two types:

(a) the sunna related to habits and customs (al-zawa‘id/aada)

(b) the sunna related to worship (ibada)

The jurists are clear that the manner of dress adopted by the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) was from the former type of sunna and not the latter. In other words, the general manner in which the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) dressed was not done with the intent to legislate a legal ruling for the community and affirm that it was obligatory to dress in that particular manner. Rather, the prophetic dress was in general reflective of the customary dress of his people. [Sadr al-Shariah, al-Tawdih (2:248-251); Ibn Nujaym, Bahr al-Ra’iq (1:29)]

This is clearly demonstrated when looking at the dress of pre-Islamic Arabs and the Arabs (both Muslims and non-Muslims) during the lifetime of the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him). All of them wore similar items of clothing, such as the izar, rida’, rayt/khimar, ni’al, and burd.

In other words, the general character of the prophetic dress was in accordance with the dress of his people. As such, in so far as the ‘sunna’ applies to the persistent performance of the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) — whether as an act of religious practice or habit — it can be stated that his sunna was to wear a waist-cloth, sandals, a cloak, a head cap, and the like. But this habitual sunna was in keeping with the general customary dress of his people, the Arabs. Consequently, it can be said that the prophetic sunna was to dress in accordance with his land and people.

Exceptions and The General Guidelines of Dress

With the above said, the dress of the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) did depart in important regards from the dress of his predecessors and contemporaries.

For example, the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) clearly defined the concept of ‘nakedness’ (awra) that all morally-responsible individuals from his community were obligated to cover as a minimum. Certain materials, such as silk, were prohibited in certain quantities. The dragging of garments below the ankles, which was common among warriors and leaders during the pre-Islamic period, was cautioned against and prohibited when done out of pride. The Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) also introduced elements in his dress that distinguished his community from others, the rules of which return to the concept of imitation.

Most of the above examples relate to the general guidelines of dress. Indeed, as it relates to the legal rules concerning dress, it was precisely such guidelines that assumed the most prominent place in a number of legal texts. To put it differently, the prophetic guidance regarding dress did not stipulate a specific form that an individual was obligated to wear as a matter of religious practice. The guidance passed down to us largely related to general principles of dress. Mufti Taqi Usmani explains this by stating:

The law has given much flexibility as it relates to the legal rules of dress. It has not made necessary on the community any specific form of dress opposing which would be impermissible. Rather, Islam has laid down general principles related to dress and has made it permissible for people to wear any type of dress as long as it conforms to these guidelines. [Usmani, Taqrir al-Tirmidhi]

This flexibility is in keeping with the diversity of mankind who were created as different races speaking different tongues and with unique cultural practices. As God says, “And of His signs is the creation of the heavens and the earth and the diversity of your languages and your colors.” (30:22)

The Libas al-Shuhra

It should also be noted at this point that there are other aspects of the sunna that jurists have understood as establishing the dislikedness of dressing in a manner contrary to one’s land unless there is some need to do so.

This dislikedness according to these scholars returns to such a manner of dressing being a cause for one needlessly standing out/notoriety (libas al-shuhra) among his or her people. The Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) reportedly said, “Whosoever wears clothing that is extravagant and unduly attracting attention in this world, God will dress him in lowly clothing in the next world.” [Abu Dawud, al-Sunan (#4029)]

In light of this tradition and others, Imam Ahmad is reported to have advised someone wearing a particle type of cloak/mantle to “dress in accordance with the people of his land” adding that if this individual was in Mecca or Medina he would not have advised him to do such, since the cloak he wore was customary there. [Ibn Muflih, al-Adab al-Shar‘iyya (3:497)]

Similarly, Ibn Battal mentions that “in a given period, a person should dress according to the dress of his land, , as long as it is not sinful to do so, since dressing in a contrary manner is a form of notoriety.” [Ibn Battal, Sharh al-Sahih al-Bukhari (9:123)]

Imam al-Saffarini stated, “One should dress in accordance with one’s local dress so that he is not pointed out by people.” [al-Saffarini, Sharh al-Manzuma al-Adab (2:161)]

In the Mawsu‘a al-Fiqhiyya it states, “Wearing clothing that opposes the custom of people is disliked as it entails notoriety, namely needlessly standing out in the eyes of people and being pointed at.” [Mawsu‘a al-Fiqhiyya al-Kuwaitiyya (6:136-37)]

These opinions are all based on a prophetic instruction. Therefore, they are from the prophetic guidance. Of course, one must note that a particular dress being a cause for notoriety will differ from region to region; certain cities with a rich multi-cultural presence, for example, are accustomed to seeing people from varying backgrounds each with their unique dress.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the information above clearly demonstrates that earlier scholars did view dressing in accordance with one’s land and people as being entailed by the guidance of the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) so long as the general guidelines the religion prescribes regarding dress were fulfilled.

While there are a number of other details relating to the issue that cannot be mentioned here, it is not inaccurate to state that the sunna guidance and the sunna practice was to dress according to the customary practice of one’s people.

In the context of the West, the general sunna and guidelines of the Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) can be fulfilled by dressing in trousers, shirts, and the like. The most important thing is to ensure that the principles the shariah has laid down for dress are met.

Wassalam,
[Ustadh] Salman Younas

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Salman Younas graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman. There he studies Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir.