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A Message To American Muslims, from Habib Ali al-Jifri

“Those whose faith only increased when people said, ‘Fear your enemy: they have amassed a great army against you,’ and who replied, ‘God is enough for us: He is the best protector,’ returned with grace and bounty from God; no harm befell them. They pursued God’s good pleasure. God’s favour is great indeed.” [Quran 3:173-174]

Despite the apparent challenges facing the American Muslim community, the underlying meaning behind such circumstances is great. This situation is a moment to deeply root your faith with trust in Allah, have certainty in Him alone, and relieve yourselves of the veil that is reliance on people and their institutions.

What transpires during these days presents an opportunity to acquaint American society with the realities of Islam through eloquence that is articulated through behaviour and character before it is articulated with words. The world is in greater need of seeing actions than words and people are in need of fellow humans with sincere hearts more than eloquent tongues. And it may just be that holding steadfast to these meanings is more appropriate, more pleasing to Allah and His Prophet ﷺ, and more redeeming of our goals in this life and the next, than entering the battle zone of current domestic politics.

Brothers and sisters, you have seen during this time, and by Allah’s grace, the support extended to you by your fellow citizens and various organizations whose hearts still beat with a strong sense of humanity and justice. This is but a message from Allah: seek refuge in Him and place your trust in Him alone, for Allah is the holder of the hearts of human beings and turns them as He wills. It is a reminder for you to fulfill the duty of what it means to be a good citizen and acquaint your fellow Americans with the magnanimity and tolerance of this religion and its noble traits in the best way possible.

The path towards realization of these meanings can be summarized as follows:

1. Filling the heart with mercy and compassion. Being resolute in your love of wanting good for everyone—for those who disagree with you before those who agree and for your adversary before your ally.

2. Being unfaltering in your commitment to upholding noble, prophetic character traits with those who are good to you as well as those who wrong you, all for the sake of Allah.

3. Having excellence in your life affairs and upholding the virtue of ‘perfection’ (itqan) in your work, by which you are seeking to attain the pleasure of Allah.

4. Extending the hand of support and cooperation to fellow Americans to work together to promote a spirit of love and human fraternity in society, and to collectively stand against calls for division, hatred and animosity.

5. Doing all of this sincerely for Allah alone, having true reliance on Him and tranquility in the heart that flows from the light of placing trust in Him.

6. Putting your trust in what Allah has above and over the anxiety that comes from expecting from His creation, and pursuing Allah’s pleasure such that it occupies the heart away from seeking the pleasure of people, for Allah said: “And Allah’s good pleasure is greatest of all”

A litany for attaining tranquility of the heart

Read every morning and evening:

HasbunaLlah wa ni’ma-l wakīl (x70)
Wa ufawidu amri ilaLlah, innaLlaha basirun bil-ibaad (x11)

May Allah grace you with every success, ennoble you with the light of His love and protect you with His protection.

With the greeting of peace,
Ali Al-Jifri, seeker of your prayers

Cover photo by Geoff Livingston. Thumbnail photo by jprwpics.

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Donald Trump and the Triumph of Islam, by Shaykh Abdal-Hakim Murad

In the aftermath of Donald Trump’s shock election, Shaykh Abdal-Hakim Murad urges us to consider where this dramatic shift in global politics is headed.


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Resources for seekers:

Soul Searching in the Hour of Chaos, by Shaykh Jihad Brown

In the aftermath of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and the surprise victory of Donald Trump, Shaykh Jihad Brown asks some tough questions and paves a way forward for American Muslims.

Its 3:00 a.m.; there is a hollow feeling in the chest, but I have family, I have students. We all knew this could very well be a possibility—never inevitable but certainly possible. While there is a silver lining up there somewhere, make no mistake, it is a rain cloud. Inclement weather does not deter the “deadliest catch”. It is what we signed up for, no? Did the believers think they had yet tasted the surat ankabut that we so relish citing from the manabir for years now? Let’s find our hearts in the resolve that has led even some Alaskan and North Pacific fisherman to embrace the Deen of Islam. The job must get done and the Prophet (Allah bless him) never promised you a rose garden.
Make no mistake; this has been a victory driven by a fear for loss of white privilege. A comforting imperceptible entitlement that seems to be slipping away with a nostalgic ‘Norman Rockwell’ America that ceased to exist long before the canaries keeled over. For some Americans it certainly never existed; and Rockwell himself—as he painted—seemed to realise that in his later years. But our question must be this, will the ‘Muslim establishment’ take this moment to realise this and reconsider their taking ‘white upper middle-class suburbia’ as their ideal? Will they address the disconcerting racism and classism so prevalent in our mosques? It is a victory made possible by a regime of dumbing down the electorate. Will Muslims reconsider their more recent insistence on dumbing down all and every aspect of Islamic discourse? An electorate devoid of critical acumen will buy anything offered as panacea; as will a Muslim community believing themselves nourished by slogans and spectacles.
Yes, the ‘elites’ of Spiro Agnew and the Editor of the Harvard Law Review have been defeated. But don’t think that this is a cattle call that the ‘herd’ shall inherit the earth. Now more than ever, intelligence is important. But it will be a grounded intelligence coupled with empathy that only Islam can bring. Wisdom, hikma and a kind word, is never data, never rhetoric. An ‘information age’ is dangerous at worst, empty at best, without the third dimension. Let us desist from our cheeky courtship of post-modern nominalism—that reality and truth lies only within the words we utter. Let us consider the compelling merit of the realism offered by a human rational soul—that principles have meaning and there is a reality independent of our thoughts and language. That Allah and truth is, regardless of whether there is a human mind to conceive it.
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What our Prophet Muhammad (Allah bless him) wanted for new shores

We are on the cusp of a period of intense soul-searching for this country. Muslims now have an opportunity forced upon them to begin a process of soul-searching as well. Will they be able to find the authenticity of perspective, direction, and contribution this society needs so deeply from them? The programme moving forward will be to ask ourselves what our Prophet Muhammad (Allah bless him) wanted for new shores; and what healing the Deen of our Creator would bring to a new society that is thirsty and suffering from its own particular forms of pain. Can we also be physicians of hearts and minds. As well as honest custodians of truth and fidelity for our own children and families?
The modern Muslim community has been one of extremes to this point. Now more than ever before we need engaged participation without assimilation; care, concern, and empathy, without sentimentality and emotionalism; authenticity and leadership without triumphalism. Here is a mā’idah disguised as a disappointment; a pasture of opportunity disguised as a tragedy. A call to what will give you life—for those who would respond. Every path to the mountain top can only begin with, “physician heal thyself.” Let’s invite one another to discover Islam as it is and not as entertaining or self-congratulating ideal; bismillah People.

Silver linings

The expectation is that matters should—in general—be safer than assumed for minorities, in that the Right Wing got what it wanted. There would have been more danger on the streets in the case of a Hillary win. Will xenophobes be emboldened—it is possible. Will there be new unfair policy initiatives, maybe. These things are uncertain still. But there will be no barrel-bombs. Rather than looking for the sky to fall just yet, let us focus instead on strengthening our hearts. Muslims will have to explore the merits of real, tangible, and true fraternity, solidarity, and community, not just as cozy buzz words and idealistic slogans—the furniture of our own form of jingoism. If you haven’t understood this then know that the 1980s called and said it wants its 1950s dinosaur figures back.
We all know privately, that there is a more privileged segment within the American Muslim community that has always leaned Republican; conflating economic conservatism with moral conservatism. Conflating prophetic istiqama with evangelical ‘moralising’. This ‘kool-aid’ of uncritical Muslim-establishment faith in the mythology of a Protestant Work Ethic will be a major obstacle to authenticity; if decision making weight on matters of theology, social well-being, and community direction continue to remain in such hands.

The need for real humanity

If ‘new Americans’ want to participate in basic mainstream American conversations—as ‘basic’ Americans—by all means, welcome. But Muslim please, don’t do so on the dime of ‘Islamic daawa’. Americans have historically been hopeful in the healing and uplifting promise in the Deen of Muhammad (Allah bless him). Take it outside if you don’t mind—get a room if you must—but  please don’t deny us that. Americans ask—explicitly or with the tongue of their condition—for that enrichment and sophisticated depth and warmth of real humanity and godly, rabbani, insight that only you can offer; not for the cold technology or mechanical management techniques that they already have. We do not tend to expect that working class Americans are going to be saved by this enterprise they have sunk their votes into. Do you have the respect, compassion, integrity, and resolve your neighbours hope for? I still find that I am unable to relinquish my hope that you do; even though its been hard. Just really, really hard.
Know that the world turns for people who put impressing Allah and His messenger first. Everything else is window dressing. Don’t get side-tracked. The ‘labeeb’ understands that when we say we dig your taste in drapes, that we’re just making small-talk to keep it down to earth.
For those who have been optimistically looking toward ‘hope’ and ‘change’, then know that it comes in phases—and recognise phase II for what it is. Take a moment, take a deep breath, and then put on your rain poncho, grab your galoshes, and be a part of building phase III. Inclement weather doesn’t prevent the fisherman from going out on deck when the job must still get done. Look up. Downpours are an inevitable part of the open seas and the waves will get rough, and the tumult of the ocean intimates uncertainty. But look up, the constellations continue to shine with their reassuring serenity and constancy; and the heavenly bodies continue to swim in their orbits—and by the stars they are guided.

Donald Trump is President. 12 of the best Muslim reactions.

In a historic and shocking turn of events, Donald J Trump has been elected president of the United States of America. How are Muslims in and out of America reacting?

Shaykh Walead Mosaad

Shaykh Walead Mosaad, Sakina Collective

Donald Trump has won this election and it would be a mistake on our part to attribute it merely to the racism, sexism, and xenophobia of uneducated rural whites. Many people came out to vote for him in unprecedented numbers because they are fed up with a system that continually enriches a ultra-small elite at the expense of the masses who no longer have adequate access to well paying jobs, healthcare, and education. The neoliberal system that has been in place for much of our history is showing signs of wear and is probably long beyond its expiry date. Yes, Trump may be a false prophet, but when people have to choose between the continuance of a status quo that has impoverished them and between the false promise of a conman, desperation has a way of finding hope in the dimmest of places. The best article I have read analyzing the phenomenon of this year’s election: The Republicans and Democrats failed blue-collar America. The left behind are now having their say.

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Tahera Ahmed, Director of Interfaith Engagement/Associate Chaplain at Northwestern University

So if you didn’t vote because you said it was “haram” and argued to wait until somehow you created a Khilafah system…. well then mubarak on your new Khalifah Donald Trump… It’s time to wake up, its time to work hard, it’s time to love, it’s time to heal and it’s time to push forward. Whenever someone says ‘I just ain’t gonna vote cuz the system is jacked’ or when a Muslim says, ‘I don’t vote cuz I think it’s haram’ although they continue to live here and reap the benefits and reject agency to implement change. What they don’t realize is how privilege has blindspots. Its so easy to dismiss the many lives who shed their sweat and blood, particularly our Black brothers and sisters so that we can vote. If you’re not voting because you reject this so-called ‘kafir system’….Really? We are living and eating and breathing in this system and rather than work towards making it better you’re easily dismissing what others have shed their blood for. We need to check our privilege…

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Mufti Mohamed-Umer Esmail, Imam at Nueces Mosque.

As we near the dawn of a Trump presidency, my advice to my Muslim brothers and sisters is to exercise patience and caution, and continue to be positive and optimistic despite the negativity as this is the tradition of Islam and Muslims. Let’s transform the challenges of a Trump presidency facing us into opportunities; opportunities of understanding and dialog, as was the habit of our Prophet (peace be upon him) and demonstrate utmost forbearance, courage, and wisdom in the face of all difficulties and calamities. We pray that God guides Donald Trump to be merciful to all His creation; especially muslims and minorities, and let this be a wake up call for us.

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Sana Saeed, Producer/Host at AJ+

A Trump presidency will impact everyone but it’s really going to hurt the poor and people of color – we’re gonna need to be and have allies. Be there for your black, latino, immigrant, muslim, undocumented, undereducated, lgbtq, sikh, low income neighbours tomorrow & every day. Be ready to protect places of worship – black churches, mosques, sikh temples, synagogues. I’m a believing woman, I have faith in goodness – but the propensity *all* human beings have towards chaos and hate is real. Even if Clinton had won this hate would be there. With Trump, it’s at the highest level in a system that wasn’t built to protect any of us. Many marginalized communities live in a quiet fear everyday of what can or will happen to them & their communities. A Trump presidency takes it to another level. More than a President Trump in and of himself, I’m worried about how for many [white] Americans – any means to ‘make America great again’ will be possible. Hold onto your loved ones tightly. And get ready to march, tear down and build up.

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Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Executive Director of SeekersHub Global

Truth will trump falsehood, as and when God wills.

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Omid Safi, Director, Duke Islamic Studies Center at Duke University

Let us stop saying “How could this happen in America”, “Who are these voters.” This, my friends, is America. This is the racism and bigotry that has been with us in America, wrapped right around all that is good and beautiful about this country. But all we have to do is ask Native Americans, African Americans, and all who have seen the terrible side of America know that this too is America. If we want to see an America that we are proud of, we have to build that America. It is not in our present, and was not part of our past, it can only be in our shared future. Yes, so many of us feel fear and dread. But we refuse to give up on hope. Let us be what scripture calls us to be: Prisoners of Hope. That hope has to come by reaching out and embracing all those who are fearful and vulnerable right now, and tomorrow, and day after tomorrow.

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Shaykh Muhammad Adeyinka Mendes, Founding Director at AHAD Institute

Maybe, just maybe, a Trump regime…I mean presidency, will rouse some of us from our apathetic slumber.

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Mona Rahman, Islamic Society of Kingston

Sent the kids to bed and they were worried then. What will we tell them in the morn? That the bully won? For all of those who are sitting on their couches saying “I told you”. Know this….those words do not do anything. Sitting and stating that the white supremacists are back does not do anything. And that is why it is frustrating. Don’t be a couch commentator…go and pray and then do something to change this world. We trust in Allah…but tie that camel and do your part by changing what is in yourselves so we can then change the world.

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Ustadh Abdullah Bin Hamid Ali, Senior faculty at Zaytuna College; Founding Director of the Lamppost Education Initiative

Don’t be a sore loser. Don’t be a cry baby either. One thing that Americans take pride in is sports. Both teams cannot win, and definitely not all the time. If you think your world has come to an end, it is only you who can make that a reality. You can only control “your” reaction. You can defend yourself from another’s. Life will continue. But how good and safe that life will be depends largely on your own decisions, your own courage, and your own level of commitment. Many of you prayed and worshiped hoping that God would give victory to your champion. But God does not take sides in such competitions, especially when the tool of prayer is misused. The Qur’an teaches us, “No affliction befalls you on Earth nor to yourselves except that it is in a record before We bring it to light; verily, that is easy for God; in order that you are not grieved by what has passed you nor that you are overjoyed by what has come to you. God does not like any conceited boaster” (Q 57:23). If your faith in God has dwindled for not receiving what you asked for, it is your own fault. God always answers prayers. His answer sometimes is simply, “No!” Humiliation is often a means for elevation. Take advantage of this opportunity to introspect and reform your deeds. Look deep into the core of your heart to discover what truly has priority. Life will carry on. Death will certainly come in its time. The refuge is with God.

Mona Hagmagid, student at University of Pennsylvania

I love my father for many reasons, but one of them is that he always has and continues to guide me through moments that are really hard to process. Tonight, I called him needing healing and comfort. He reminded me of the story of the Prophet (saw) and Abu Bakr (ra) in the cave of Thawr together, and Abu Bakr (ra) was so scared because the enemy was right outside. The Prophet (saw) told him that though they were two, Allah was their third. Our Prophet Muhammad (saw) went through extreme suffering, far greater than what many of us can imagine, and he is now the beloved leader of one of the largest, most diverse faiths on the planet. He was taken to heaven and promised his place in it because he worked tirelessly to make the world a better place, and to promote justice to everyone. All the while Allah was by his side. Change has never happened in this country simply by submitting a ballot and hoping it all works out for the better. Systematic and meaningful change requires work, and resources. Change is strategic and purposeful, change occurs when people decide to take a chance and sacrifice their time and energy for the sake of Allah. Change begins in our masajid, our schools, in our MSAs and in our households. Change takes to the streets and to the microphones and to the publishing houses. Change is continuous and it is tiring. Sometimes change doesn’t even show herself until years after the tears and sweat have dried, and bodies have decomposed. We do not live our lives for The Change. It is the process and the purity in struggling for it that brings us closer to Allah (swt). The ballots we cast today only decided what battles we will be fighting for the next four years, not who wins them. Let’s move.

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Linda Sarsour, Co-Founder/CEO at MPower Change, Executive Director at Arab American Association of New York

Listen. I am feeling determined. This is a wake up call. I know, it seems like the end of the world but it’s not. Don’t despair. I know we feel disappointed. But now it’s all just a bit more clearer. No matter what happens tonight, we will get up tomorrow and organize harder and more than we have ever organized before. I am more committed now than I ever was. Hope. There’s always us and hope. We are hope. Abdullah Hammoud, young Arab American Muslim just won a state legislature seat in Dearborn. Ilhan Omar just became the first Somali American woman in the country to win a State legislature in Minnesota. Hope. I still have it. Heart. I still have it. Mind, skills, courage – I still have it. We all have it. No more silent majority. Now its time to get bigger and louder than ever. We are not a people moved by fear. We are a community moved by love, compassion and justice. Keep your head up and show up when you are called to the streets, called to action. I am not committed to any political party or person, I am committed to us, to our families, to our communities. We are what matters.

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Hina Khan-Mukhtar, ILM Tree in Lafayette, California

One of my son’s shuyukh wrote this text to his students just now: Time to celebrate. I just gave cake to my kids and am having cake myself. My daughter asked me, “Why are you celebrating?” I told her, “I am celebrating because Allah is in control no matter who the President will be.”

#‎Blacklivesmatter Because Our Lord Demands It – Ustadh Salman Younas

‪#‎Blacklivesmatter‬ because our Lord has “ennobled all the children of Adam” (17:70) and commanded us to “stand firmly for justice.” (4:135), writes Ustadh Salman Younas.

‪#‎Blacklivesmatter to me not because it is politically prudent for Muslims to side with African-Americans.
They matter to me not because it’s viewed by some as the new countercultural trend that people should hop on.
They matter to me not because it is a convenient and beneficial alliance for my community.
They matter to me not because of a mere desire to be integrated into mainstream society and its indigenous people.
Why do they matter to me? Because my Lord has “ennobled all the children of Adam” (17:70) and commanded me to “stand firmly for justice.” (4:135)
They matter to me because my Prophet (God bless him) said that when his followers become “afraid to say to the oppressor that you are an oppressor, they will be abandoned by God.” [Ahmad, Musnad with a rigorously authentic chain]
They matter to me because my Prophet (God bless him) spent his entire life serving the weak, underprivileged, and those treated unjustly. His justice and mercy extended to all regardless of their religion or color. His teachings condemned racism as he stressed that virtue lay in doing good and being pious, not through possessing “white skin over black skin.” [Ahmad, Musnad with a sound chain].
They matter to me because oppression, killing, racial injustice and the systematic abuse of a people is a heinous crime in my religion. I dread the day I have to stand in front of my Lord and in front of my Prophet having witnessed police brutality against a black father, the shooting death of an innocent black teenager, the mass and oppressive incarceration of an entire black generation, the racial inequality experienced daily by the black community, and say I did nothing to fight this plague that occurred every day in front of my eyes.

These lives must matter to Muslims because our Lord demands they do, our Prophet (God bless him) demands they do, and our religion demands they do. This is what being a Muslim is about. We will continue to strive for justice and to rid this world of all forms of oppression through whatever noble means we can.

We ask everyone to support such movements in keeping with the directives of God to “cooperate with one another in righteousness” (5:2) and the directive of our beloved Prophet (God bless him) who advised us to “make such alliances in order to return rights to their people, that no oppressor should have power over the oppressed.” [Musnad al-Humaydi]
We ask God to give us the strength and courage to stand up against all forms of injustice in the way our Prophet Muhammad (God bless him) did. May His blessings descend upon us and all those suffering throughout the world.
Follow Ustadh Salman Younas on Facebook.

Resources for seekers

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf on Gay Muslims; Scholars Issue Statement

Scholars Issue Statement

“We, as American Muslims, follow the openhearted and inclusive Islam of Muhammad Ali and completely reject the hatred, provincialism, and intolerance of those who trample upon the rights of others, besmirching and defiling the name of Islam.”

On June 13, 2016, Muslim leaders across North America signed the Orlando Statement. Signatories include, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf, Shaykh Abdullah Bin Bayyah, and Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.
You can read the statement, in full, at the Orlando Statement website.

Shaykh Hamza Yusuf gave a brief interview addressing several difficult issues. We reproduce it below with thanks to CNN.

Q: There have been many statements from Muslims condemning terrorism. Why issue another one?
A: Muslims are constantly being accused of not condemning these types of attacks, even though I don’t have any control over what other people do, and they don’t represent me or my faith. Nobody associates all Seventh-day Adventists with David Koresh, who belonged to a splinter sect, or all of Judaism with Meir Kahane. But when these things happen, the whole religion of Islam is besmirched. We’re trapped in this constant cycle of: events, condemnation; events, condemnation. And then people still say, “Why don’t Muslims condemn these things?”
Q: What do you make of Donald Trump’s speech about Islam and terrorism on Monday?
A: He’s playing a dangerous game, and a lot of lives are threatened by that type of saber-rattling. We’re in an extremely volatile situation and social media has introduced an unprecedented element that we don’t fully understand.
Q: Trump and President Obama are arguing over whether to label attacks like the Orlando shooting “radical Islam.”
A: When a man wrote a political screed against the IRS and flew into its building, he was deemed mentally ill, even though it was clearly a political act. There’s a double standard, which is: If his name is Muhammad, it’s automatically terrorism. This man (Omar Mateen) wasn’t a radical Islamist. To drink or go to gay bars, or any kind of bar, is prohibited in Islam. He seemed to be a nominal Muslim. He went to mosques on occasion but I don’t see a lot of devotion there.
Q: What about the gay community and gay Muslims who may feel ostracized from mainstream Islam?
A: As we say in the Orlando statement, we are committed to Abrahamic morality, but it should not to be imposed on others. America is about choices, including those to live certain lifestyles. There’s a statement in the Quran: There should be “absolutely no compulsion in religion.”
Q: What about gay Muslims, though?
A: Look, I don’t have the power to issue papal decrees. We don’t have that type of structure in our tradition. But I have studied the tradition, and the vast majority of Muslims would never accept the lawfulness of an active homosexual lifestyle. I don’t see that happening. But there is also no authority in the tradition for any individual to take things into his own hands and impose their version of the religion on someone else.
Q: Why can’t Muslim teachings on homosexuality change? Is it because the Quran, which is considered the inerrant word of God, condemns it?
A: The Quran is pretty explicit in its condemnation of the act, and we have a long tradition of jurisprudence that defines it as unlawful. But there were also fatwas permitting people who had those attractions to relieve themselves so they wouldn’t fall into active engagement. There’s an awareness that this is a real human urge. I definitely have sympathy for people who are struggling. I’ve met with young Muslims who have told me about their struggles. But I’m not sure they want our sympathies; they want full recognition of their lifestyle, and my religion tells me that I can’t accept that. But I can’t — and won’t — impose my beliefs on others, either verbally or otherwise. I’m not going to judge people.
Q: What do you say when gay Muslims tell you about their struggles?
A: I say that I’m not going to deny your experience but my recommendation is not to actively engage in behavior outside of what is permitted in the religion. I know that people can live celibate lives, I did it myself for many years.
Q: The punishment for homosexuality in some schools of Islamic jurisprudence can be quite harsh.
A: There’s no specific punishment in the books of fiqh (Islamic laws) that relate to homosexuality per se. They apply to any illicit sexual relations, including prohibited heterosexual acts like adultery. And the punishments are strong, but they are legal fictions because they are impossible to prove. You need four witnesses to say they witnessed (sexual) penetration. In what circumstances are you going to find someone to testify to that?
Q: A lot of Muslims have lamented that the feelings of goodwill after Muhammad Ali’s funeral quickly dissipated after the Orlando shooting. You were at Ali’s memorial. What was that like?
A: Dr. Sherman Jackson said it best: Muhammad Ali put an end to the idea that you can’t be an American and a Muslim. We were all feeling that last week. The memorial was all planned by Muhammad Ali himself, and I was impressed by how much his faith was highlighted, even by people of other traditions. The spirit of love that embodied the city of Louisville for two days was overwhelming. Everyone was smiling and hugging. It felt like such a breakthrough for our community … and then, Orlando. We went from the incredible pathos of joy to the bathos of despair. It’s one step forward, two steps back.

Dalia Mogahed’s debut at TED met with standing ovation

What do you think when you look at me?

When you look at Muslim scholar Dalia Mogahed, what do you see: a woman of faith? a scholar, a mom, a sister? or an oppressed, brainwashed, potential terrorist? In this personal, powerful talk, Mogahed asks us, in this polarizing time, to fight negative perceptions of her faith in the media — and to choose empathy over prejudice – TED

Resources for seekers:

Excellent Interview with Muslim Woman Removed From Trump Rally

On Friday night, Muslim flight attendant Rose Hamid was escorted out of a Donald Trump rally in Rock Hill, South Carolina after she stood silently for a few moments, wearing a t-shirt that said “Salam: I Come In Peace,” as well as a yellow star-shaped badge reminiscent of the patches worn by Jews in Nazi Europe.

“Do you have a bomb?”

After her ejection, Hamid told CNN’s Don Lemon about the experience, which she said included Trump supporters asking her “Do you have a bomb?” (to which she replied “No, do you have a bomb?”).
Hamid said she attended the rally with the “sincere belief if people get to know each other one-on-one they will stop being afraid of each other and we can get rid of the hate in the world…There were people who were very nice and sharing their popcorn. It was very nice, people around me, the people I had conversations with. But then what happened when the crowd got this hateful crowd mentality as I was being escorted. It was really quite telling and a vivid example of what happens when you start using this hateful rhetoric, and how it can incite a crowd where moments ago were very kind to me. One woman reached over and shook my hand and said “I’m so sorry this is happening to you.””
See also, Hamid’s interview with Marie Claire magazine.

Resources for seekers: