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Joining prayers at work

Question: In winter the time between Dhuhr and Maghrib in my country is very short. Am I allowed to join prayers while I am at work?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

If praying Dhuhr and Asr on time pose great hardship, due to the nature of one’s work or medical condition, one may combine Dhuhr and Asr either before Maghrib time comes in, or at the beginning of Dhuhr. (Kashhaf al Qina, Bahuti; Bughyat al Mustarshidin, Abd al Rahman Mashhur; Rawdat al Talibin, Nawawi; Kifayat al Akhyar, Hisni; al Awsat, Ibn al Mundhir)

One should be very careful not to abuse this dispensation. There is a big difference between the genuine practical impossibility of praying on time because one’s work requires one to keep watch of something, for example, for the whole prayer time, and the mere awkwardness of asking to go for a prayer break. Joining for the latter reason is cowardice and is sinful.

As the scholars say, one should only take a dispensation when one genuinely feels that Allah Himself wants one to take it. ‘And Allah knows the man who means mischief from the man who means good.’ (Qur’an, 2: 220)

If one’s work does not allow even one to pray Dhuhr and Asr by joining, then one must look for other work.

I pray this helps.

[Shaykh] Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Ours Is Not A Caravan of Despair: Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

True joy lies within the heart, and it is unshakeable. Every breath, heartbeat, and moment is a gift from Allah.not a caravan of despair

Knowing that happiness comes from Allah, we should keep in mind that suffering and hardship come from the same Lord.

An Alternative Perspective

But how can there be joy in hardship? This is where the believer sees things differently. We know that there is a Hereafter, and that we find mercy in the response. When we find oppression, difficulty and distress, we know that is it an opportunity to turn to Allah.

With any situation, our question should be; “How can I be a truly grateful servant? What is the response of gratitude?” Through prayer, charity, advocacy and gathering with others, we work to find a solution. Rather than be a social commentator, we should connect with those who are suffering, and work to improve their lot. Through action we can truly express our gratitude.

The question we need to ask is not, “Why are things the way they are?” Rather the question is, “What is the response required from me?”

See Allah in Everything

One of the poets said, “If you see God as the actor in everything, you behold all creation as beautiful. But if all you see are the traces of His creation, you turn something dazzlingly beautiful into something ugly.”

In the Qur’an, it has been revealed that, “For indeed, with hardship comes ease. Indeed, with hardship comes ease.” (94:4-5). Rather than being told that ease comes after hardship, we are told that it comes with hardship. Allah is not telling us that ease is coming; He is telling us that ease is here.

May Allah grant us to see the opportunity for mercy, good, gratitude, direction, and positivity in every situation. After all, ours is not a caravan of despair.


Resources for Seekers

How Can I Advise Someone Who Has Been Hardened Through Hardships?

Answered by Ustadh Sharif Rosen

Question: Assalam alaykum

How can I help or advise someone who has had a lot of hardship but has become mean?

He seems to have lost his sense of what should and shouldn’t be said to others and has become judgmental and presumptuous.

Answer: as-Salamu ‘alaykum wa rahmatulLah.

Thank you for raising this question in which your care for the person undergoing these issues is clear. That could be your greatest source of influence in this situation. Through the very closeness of your relationship to this individual, it perhaps allows you to have an honest, delicate conversation with them about what you are noticing in them, and why it is of such concern. Often, those most needing to hear ways they can improve their sense of well-being are unwilling to heed advice except from those they have come to trust. You appear to be beyond such a point with this person so are in a position to raise these issues with the needed sensitivity that may help them to listen and consider a change.

It would be easy, yet perhaps unwise to simply tell them “be more grateful”, “focus on your blessings”, and so forth. Indeed, we want them (and us) to ascend to a place to receive the nourishment that comes with an active spiritual life fueled by gratitude, hope, and balance. Yet, know that many of those who are most angry and frustrated reached this place because they feel insufficiently heard and understood. By taking time to first listen to their concerns without judgement or impatience, to later share your own, you should find them more receptive to considering ways to leave the cycles of blame and argumentation that you are alluding to.

I hope this is helpful in your ability to offer them emotional and spiritual care. May Allah reward your compassion and concern.

wa-Salam,

[Ustadh] Sharif Rosen

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Sharif Rosen is the Muslim Chaplain at Williams College (in the Northeastern United States) where he works to enhance campus life through spiritual and pastoral care; advocacy and coalition building; and deepening mutual understanding within and between communities.  His formative Islamic studies, past and ongoing, have been at the hands of scholars connected via unbroken transmission to the Prophet Muhammad, upon him be peace and blessings.  Most of Sharif’s training occurred in Amman, Jordan from 2008 – 2013, with a focus on creed, ritual law, spirituality, Quranic recitation and exegesis and through which he has received permission to transmit his Islamic learning.  Sharif has a B.A. in History from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, and is now completing his graduate studies.  He completed the Classical Arabic program at the Qasid Arabic Institute in Amman, where he was also the Director of Student Life.  He currently serves as the Vice President for Educational Chaplaincy with the U.S.-based Association of Muslim Chaplains.

The Prophet Muhammad’s ﷺ Forbearance, by Imam Khalid Latif

In these dark and confusing times, Imam Khalid Latif reminds us how the best of mankind, Prophet Muhammad ﷺ responded to adversity.

Zayd ibn San’an (may Allah be pleased with him) narrates:
Once, God’s Messenger  borrowed some money from me. I was not yet a Muslim then. I went to him to collect my debt before its due time, and insulted him, saying; ‘You the children of ‘Abd al-Muttalib, are very reluctant to pay your debts!’ ‘Umar (may Allah be pleased with him) became very angry with this insult of mine and shouted; ‘O enemy of God! Were it not for the treaty between us and the Jewish community, I would cut off your head! Speak to God’s Messenger politely!’
However, God’s Messenger  smiled at me and, turning to ‘Umar (may Allah be pleased with him), said, “Umar, pay the man his debt! And add to it the amount of twenty gallons because you have frightened him!”
Umar (may Allah be pleased with him) relates the rest of the story: “We went together. On the way, Zayd (may Allah be pleased with him) spoke to me unexpectedly;

O ‘Umar! You got angry with me. But I have found in him all the features of the Last Prophet recorded in the Torah, the Old Testament. However, there is this verse in it: ‘His mildness surpasses his anger. The severity of impudence to him increases him only in mildness and forbearance.’ In order to test his forbearance, I uttered what I uttered. Now I am convinced that he is the Prophet whose coming the Torah predicted, so, I believe and bear witness that he is the Last Prophet.

The mildness and forbearance of God’s Messenger  sufficed for the conversion of Zayd ibn San’an (may Allah be pleased with him), who was one of the Jewish scholars of the time. [Suyuti, al-Khasa’is, 1.26; I. Hajar, al-Isabah, 1.566.]
The Prophet was a person of Haleem, his example for us was that he had a sense of kindness and love and a sense of justice and compassion.
Your prayer is not only for you but for all of humanity, your forbearance impacts all of humanity. Look inside and ask yourself “What am I going to give?”
The Prophet in his forbearance was always merciful, compassionate, generous, loving and a source of hope.
Pray, smile and love others from your heart. The things that are happening around us, hardships do exist, ask yourself how will you meet it? If you meet it with anything less than true forbearance, to be able to recognise and what it means for us individually and communally, Allah will give us opportunities for growth and we will have to decide if we are going to take it on or not.

We are grateful to ICNYU for this recording.

Resources for seekers

[cwa id=’cta’]

Muslim Convert: Is Islam Just an Arabian Faith?

Yusuf, a Hindu from the UK, lost a beloved uncle in tragic circumstances at the young age of 15. This led him to contemplate the impermanence of life. He started reading about other faiths and their beliefs about death and the Hereafter.

His little understanding of Islam Muslim convertgarnered through stories in the Reader’s Digest led him to believe Islam was violent, oppressive and an Arabian religion. But in the Quran, he found the opposite.Muslim convert

Still, he was a Brahmin Hindu; he could never be Muslim. However, that’s not what his heart was telling him. He converted to Islam at the age of 15 years old and found that he had finally come home. Watch on to learn more about Yusuf’s conversion to Islam.

Resources for Seekers

Three Acts That Defined Abdul Sattar Edhi’s Life, by Ustadh Salman Younas

Ustadh Salman Younas summarizes the core essence of Abdul Sattar Edhi’s life in the words of the Prophet ﷺ

Orphans

The Prophet (God bless him) said, “The one who cares for an orphan will be with me in Paradise like this,” and he held his two fingers together. [Bukhari]
Imagine then the station and proximity of one who cared for and assisted hundreds of thousands of orphans.

Widows

The Prophet (God bless him) said, “The person who strives on behalf of the widow and poor is like one who strives in the way of God and like one who fasts in the day and prays at night.” [Bukhari, Muslim]

Imagine then the number of fasts and prayers earned by one who cared for millions of widows and poor people.

Daughters

The Prophet (God bless him) said about a widowed woman he was informed about who was taking care of her two daughters, “Whoever looks after these girls in any way and is good to them will have them as a veil from the Fire.” [Bukhari, Muslim]
Imagine then the number of veils between the fire and someone who looked after millions of little girls.

The Grief-stricken

The Prophet (God bless him) said, “Whoever removes a worldly grief from a believer, God will remove from him one of the griefs of the Day of Judgment.” [Muslim]
Imagine then the amount of grief and hardship removed from a person who lifted the grief and worry of millions of people.
This was Abdul Sattar Edhi‬. May God have mercy upon him, and us, and all people everywhere.

Follow Ustadh Salman Younas on Facebook.
Three Acts That Formed The Core Of Abdul Sattar Edhi's Life, by Ustadh Salman Younas

Does Religion Not Contain Hardship?

Answered by Ustadh Shuaib Ally

Question: As salam alaikum,

I have a question about Quranic verse 22:78 where it is said that there is no difficulty in the religion. How are we as Muslims supposed to understand the part of this verse about our religion not having any difficulty? I am a little confused because religion can seem difficult sometimes.

Answer: wa `alaykum assalam

The verse:

Strive hard for God as is His due: He has chosen you and placed no hardship in your religion, the faith of your forefather Abraham. God has called you Muslims – both in the past and in this [message] – so that the Messenger can bear witness about you and so that you can bear witness about other people. So keep up the prayer, give the prescribed alms, and seek refuge in God: He is your protector – an excellent protector and an excellent helper (22:78).

Does Religion not contain Hardship?

Commentators on the Qur’an have not understood the verse above to indicate that there is no hardship whatsoever involved in religious practice or dictates; making anything incumbent at all is in some way a form of hardship.

Rather, they have understood it to indicate that even though he has commanded humanity to strive hard in his way and has chosen them, he has nevertheless made things easy for them out of his infinite mercy and love. He thus hasn’t burdened them with what they are unable to bear or carry out.

Moreover, when something that contains hardship has been rendered obligatory, dispensations, or ways in which groups of people of varying capabilities can fulfill it, have also been provided.

Examples of Common Dispensations:

-Availability of repentance for any and all sins one has been afflicted with
-Shortening of prayer for travelers
-Performing prayer sitting for those unable to stand (or lying down, or with gestures)
-Removal of some of the strictures that had been placed upon previous nations like the Children of Israel
-Flexibility in the order of performing the rites of Hajj
-Forgiveness of error in starting or ending a calendar month with consequence, such as Ramadan, or standing in ‘Arafa on the wrong day

Similar Verses in the Qur’an

There are similar verses in the Qur’an that underline the general rule that religious dictates are not meant to make things difficult for people. These verses often come after the Qur’an has explained a way in which God has rendered something easier.

“God desires ease for you, and does not desire hardship for you” (2:185) comes amidst verses that describe various dispensations for those unable to carry out the overall difficult task of fasting during the month of Ramadan, such as travelers and the unwell.
“God does not desire to cause difficulty for you” (5:6) comes during a verse that describes how to perform ablution for prayer, as well as the dispensation available for those who have no water.

Sources: Tafsir al-Razi; Tafsir al-Qurtubi; Tafsir Sa’id Hawwa

Shuaib Ally

What Does the Verse 286 of Surah Al Baqara Mean ?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam
Question: Assalamu alaykum
What does the verse 286 of Surah Al Baqara mean? Is it referring to spiritual aspect of hardship or does it refer to the physical aspect of it?
Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,
I pray that you are in the best of health and faith, insha’Allah.
Allah Most High says, “God does not burden any soul with more than it can bear: each gains whatever good it has done, and suffers its bad…” [2.286]
Suyuti explains, “God does not burden any soul with more than it can bear, that is, what it is capable of bearing; each gains whatever good it has done, of good and its reward, and suffers its bad, of evil and its burden: no person shall be requited for another’s sin or for what he has not earned, even if he was tempted to do it.” [Tafsir Jalalayn]
Mufti Muhammad Shafi` writes in his Ma`arif al-Qur’an [1.722], “…thoughts that enter the heart without one’s intention and control, and are not translated into action, stand all excused in the sight of Allah Almighty. Deeds that are undertaken with choice and volition will be the only ones apprehended and called to account.”
Please also see: How Do You Distinguish Between a Test From Allah and Punishment? and: A Time to Build: How Believers Respond To Trials and Tests
And Allah alone gives success.
Checked & Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.

Qur’anic Reflections: Divine Tests and the Great Virtue of Steadfast Patience

In the Name of Allah, the Benevolent, the Merciful

Divine Tests and the Great Virtue of Steadfast Patience

 

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Allah Most High tells us in the Qur’an:

“And We will surely test you with something of fear and hunger and a loss of wealth and lives and fruits, but give good tidings to the patient, who, when distress strikes them, say, “Indeed we belong to Allah , and indeed to Him we will return.” Those are the ones upon whom are blessings from their Lord and mercy. And it is those who are the truly guided.” [Qur’an, 2.155-157]

It has come in hadith from the Beloved Messenger of Allah (peace & blessings be upon him & his folk) that, “Whoever says ‘innaa li’l Llahi wa innaa ilayhi raji`un (We are Allah’s and to Him is our return)’ in distress, Allah will reward them for it and grant them good in exchange.”

It has also come in hadith that once a lamp got extinguished, so the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) said “innaa li’l Llahi wa innaa ilayhi raji`un (We are Allah’s and to Him is our return).” A’isha (Allah be pleased with her) remarked, “It is only a lamp!” The Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) responded, “Everything that displeases the believer is distress.” [Abu Dawud, in his Marasil]

The Meaning of ‘innaa li’l Llahi wa innaa ilayhi raji`un’ (We are Allah’s and to Him is our return)

It is explained in Tafsir al-Jalalayn that this means:

(We are Allah’s) as His property and servants, and He can do with us as He wills. (And to Him is our return) in the Hereafter, where He will recompense us.

Realization of Slavehood

This is a realization of one’s slavehood (`ubudiyya), that Allah is both one’s Creator and Sustainer; that everything is from Allah; and that one’s responsibility and opportunity is to accept things insofar as they are from Allah, and to turn to Him in both ease and distress in the ways most likely to be most pleasing to Him.

The Meaning of “Give good tidings to the patient”

Patience is to remain firm on what is pleasing to Allah.

Ibn Ajiba states:

(Give good tidings to the patient) namely, those who remain resolute in their seeking. They shall attain unto everything that they long for, and will reach that will they set forth for. They are those when faced by obstacles or impediments realize their neediness as servants of Allah, and attach themselves to the Power of His Lordship. So they return to Allah in all matters. And He thereby grants them shelter from all things. This are the ones who have particular concern from their Lord and those whom He draws close. (And it is those who are truly guided) to close proximity to the Beloved. [Ibn Ajiba, al-Bahr al-Madid]

Shaykh al-Islam Abu Su`ud said in his Qur’anic exegesis,

Patience is not merely uttering this statement of return (“innaa li’llahi…”) with the tongue. Rather, it is to affirm its meaning with the heart (at well), such that one brings to mind what one was created for; that one is returning to their Lord; reminding oneself of Allah’s blessings upon one; and to remember that what remains of these blessings is many times greater than what was lost (in the difficulty). If one does this, then the distress will become easy to bear, and it will return to submission.”

He continues by explaining that the good tidings are what is mentioned after: it is such steadfastly patient individuals are those who are truly guided to all that is correct and true–which is why they surrender, submit, and return to Allah in accepting His Decree (qada’). And it is these people who succeed in attaining their religious and worldly goals, because anyone who attains unto their Allah’s concern, mercy, and blessings will not have missed out on anything worth seeking. [Tafsir Abu’s Su`ud]

Ibn Juzayy states:

A point of benefit: Patience has been mentioned in the Qur’an in more than seventy places, because of the tremendousness of its place in religion. Some of the scholar have said that all good deeds have known reward except for patience, because the reward of patience is beyond measure–because Allah Most High states, “The patient shall be granted their reward beyond measure.”

 

Related Entries:

SG Blog: The Qur’an on Patience, Steadfastness, Resolve, Mindfulness, and Success – 3.200

SG IslamCast: Patience (sabr)–its virtues, reality, and manifestation – Faraz Rabbani – Khutba

Guidance of the Prophet Muhammad on the Virtues of Patience (and Thankfulness) in Tribulation and Hardship

And Allah alone gives success.

Faraz Rabbani

Dealing With Non-Muslim Parents (II)

Answered by Ustadh Faraz A. Khan

Question: My non-Muslim parents and relatives are against my practicing of Islam. Obedience and submission to God has no place in their mind. Since I am with them now, far away from scholars and people to ask for advice, my faith is terribly low. Here, I’m involved in sin because I don’t find the strength to tell my family I don’t shake hands with women and that I must fast in Ramadan. My mother seems to be unable to bear such changes because she had many trials in the last years. She cries almost every day. So I don’t know how to tell her that it’s not finished, there’s something more, it’s not just praying five times a day and not eating non halal meat and not having girlfriends.

I keep making supplication to be delivered from this situation but I think my faith is weak. I don’t uphold the prophetic character because it’s hard for me, having no living example around me, being sad and stressed for this situation, finding hard to communicate with people, particularly my parents, without starting talking about impermissible stuff, slandering, or things like that. Please advise me.

Answer:
Assalamu alaikum wa rahmatullah,

I pray this reaches you in the best of health and faith. May Allah Most High shower you with blessings and ease for you your affairs, especially in the approaching blessed month of Ramadan.

Misgivings Regarding Weakness of Faith and Supplication Not Being Answered

In the Qur’an, Allah Most High calls the devil “the deceiver” [gharur], as he most often resorts to trickery and deception when casting misgivings in the breast of the believer. This is termed “satanic whispering” [waswasa], and is such a common tactic of the devil that Allah sealed His Book with the chapter that teaches us to seek refuge in Him Most High from such whisperings [Sura Nas].

Moreover, one of the aims of the devil’s whispering is to push the human being into despair and depression, making him feel so low as to lose all hope in Allah and His infinite mercy. When the believer entertains feelings of worthlessness and being undeserving of Allah’s compassion, he should immediately recognize those feelings as stemming directly from the devil and, as the Qur’an commands, “take him as an enemy” [35:6]. How does one respond to an enemy? Combat. This combat against the devil entails seeking refuge in Allah Most High, performing ablution, and turning one’s heart sincerely and solely to Allah Most High, in full hope, reliance, gratitude and love of the Divine. These lofty states of the heart are the most potent weapons against Satan, as he despises nothing more than a believer expressing love and gratitude towards Allah. Part of having true hope in Allah is to be certain that He will answer one’s supplication, as He Himself states in the Qur’an, “Call on Me, and I will surely answer you” [40:60]. This is a promise from Allah, and as He Most High states, “Allah never breaks His promise” [3:9].

Increasing the strength of one’s faith is a gradual process, and one should not get disheartened by slips and lapses in one’s practice, but rather take the means to ensure long-term growth and improvement. These include learning one’s religion, implementing what one learns to the best of one’s ability, and turning to Allah for help in obeying His commands. In light of your being a convert to Islam, I would recommend taking the steps outlined in the following answer with regards to dealing with your non-Muslim parents:

Love For Your Parents and When Not to Obey

Allah and His Messenger [peace and blessings be upon him] exhort the believer to love his parents and family, whether they are Muslim or not. The believer’s attitude towards his family should reflect ihsan, or kindness and excellence in conduct, in all circumstances. Allah Most High says, “And We have enjoined upon man kindness to his parents” [29:8]. However, obedience to one’s parents is conditioned upon it being in accordance with the Sacred Law. As such, the verse continues, “But if they strive to make you associate with Me that of which you have no knowledge, then obey them not.” Allah Most High gives the example of parents trying to compel their child to engage in the most heinous of crimes, namely, associating partners with the Divine [shirk], yet the verse extends to anything prohibited by Allah. This is supported by the oft-cited prophetic statement, “There is no obedience to creation if it entails disobedience to the Creator” [Tabarani]. On a practical note, I would strongly encourage you to take courses on Islamic law [fiqh] to learn the limits of the Sacred Law and when you can or cannot take legal dispensations when dealing with your parents.

Finally, to encourage the believer to be strong and steadfast in the face of such an overwhelming trial, that of refusing to obey one’s parents in sin while simultaneously displaying the kindness and excellence owed to them despite their attitude, Allah Most High ends the verse with the most important thing to keep in mind with trials, “To Me is your final return, so I will inform you of what you used to do.” [Nasafi/Madarik al-Tanzil] The believer’s destination is Allah, and as such his hope is in Allah, his heart is with Allah, his days are for Allah, his nights are for Allah, and his very breaths are for Allah. The believer desires nothing except to win the good pleasure of his Lord. Keeping one’s destination in mind alleviates the toils of the journey, no matter how arduous, especially when the destination is one of ultimate joy and felicity.

Feelings of Being Left Without Guidance

If your questions to scholars are not being answered immediately, be patient and have a good opinion of both those scholars as well as Allah. Allah would never leave a servant without guidance; rather, such delays are part of the trials of life that He gives us to test our patience and contentment with the Divine Decree. Have the very best opinion of your Lord, and you will find Him to be as you conceive of Him. If you have firm conviction that He is always with you and will always give you a way out of your troubles, then He will never leave you in a bind. Our Beloved Messenger [peace and blessings be upon him] taught us that Allah says, “I am in the opinion of My servant” [Bukhari].

Remember also that such thoughts, that Allah would leave you without guidance, are again from the devil’s whispering, so take him as an enemy and never believe his vicious lies.

Fasting in Ramadan and Your Mother’s Feelings

If you are of sound health then you must fast in Ramadan. Do not worry about your mother’s emotions. Treat her with as much kindness, love and respect as you are able to, and leave the rest to Allah. The word for “heart” in Arabic is qalb, derived from a root meaning “to turn over or change.” Human hearts by their very nature are constantly changing, swaying from one emotion to the next, except those who Allah Most High makes steadfast on the truth. Remember that everything in this universe, including the emotional state of your parents, is in Allah’s hands. Our Beloved Messenger [peace and blessings be upon him] is reported to have said, “The hearts of the children of Adam, all of them, are between two fingers of the fingers of the All-Merciful, like one single heart; He turns them whichever way He wants” [Muslim]. And Allah says in the Qur’an, “And verily, He alone is the One who causes laughter and causes crying” [53:43]. So consign the matter of your mother’s heart and emotional states to Him, and trust His wisdom and decree. He is in full control, and He will never let you down, inshaAllah.

Dealing with Hardship

Focus instead on your own heart and relationship with Allah. The above hadith regarding human hearts ends with the following beautiful supplication: “O Turner of hearts, make my heart steadfast on Your obedience.”

اللّهُمَّ مُصَرِّفَ الْقُلُوْبِ صَرِّفْ قُلُوْبَنَا عَلى طَاعَتِك

Along with this supplication, keep your tongue moist with the remembrance of Allah, send abundant blessings upon the Messenger, and learn about his blessed life and character [peace and blessings be upon him]. The more one learns about his life, the more tranquility one finds in the face of hardship.

Lastly, remember the following words of our Beloved Messenger [peace and blessings be upon him] and realize that the hardship you face brings much good for you in both this life and the next: “No toil, sickness, anxiety, sadness, harm, or stress afflicts a Muslim – even the thorn that pricks him – except that with it, Allah erases some of his sins” [Bukhari, Muslim].

And Allah alone gives success.

wassalam
Faraz A. Khan

Checked & Approved by Faraz Rabbani

Faraz A. Khan has lived in Amman, Jordan, for several years studying and teaching traditional Islamic sciences, with a focus on Hanafi jurisprudence, hadith studies, theology, logic, and Arabic grammar. He translated and annotated the classical Hanafi primer “Ascent to Felicity” (Maraqi ‘l-Sa`adat) by Imam Shurunbulali, recently published by White Thread Press.