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Shaykh Ibrahim Osi-Efa on Sura Luqman – On Faith and Belief

Sura Luqman emphasizes tarbiya, or spiritual growth, and is named after a great sage. In this series, Shaykh Ibrahim Osi-Efa explores the meanings of this chapter.

Sura Luqman has 34 verses. Some say that all 34 verses were revealed in Mecca, while others say that all but two or three verses were revealed in Mecca. Regardless, it is classed as a Meccan sura because most of it was revealed there. This is significant, because Mecca was the place that the believers were spiritually raised, while Medina was the corroboration of the time in Mecca. As a reflection of this, the Meccan suras often had the theme of spiritual development, with reminders to remember Allah, as well of the afterlife. In contrast, the suras revealed in Medina focuses on various laws.Surah Luqman

As a Meccan sura, Sura Luqman touches on subjects relating to spiritual development. This makes it a good lesson for parents and caregivers, as many of these lessons are directly connected to child-rearing themes.

In fact our mother Aisha, Allah be pleased with her, who was raised in the environment of Mecca, said, “We first learned faith, and then we learned the Qur’an, (meaning the laws defined in the Qur’an), and it increased us in faith.” She also said in another narration, “Had we learned law before faith, we would have disbelieved or become hypocrites.”

In our times, there is often an overwhelming focus on implementation of the law, before faith has taken root. This is a dangerous approach, because it can distance the person from faith.

It is important point to remember for anyone supporting a person in their spiritual development, whether they be a friend, a parent, a child, or an extended family member. When helping someone, one should try their best to nourish them spiritually, rather than simply throwing the law onto them.


With gratitude to Greensville Trust.


Resources for Seekers

 

 

 

Why Did The Prophet Love Madinah? by Shaykh Faid Mohammed Said

What was it about the city of Madinah that the Prophet Muhammed loved so much? Shaykh Faid Mohammed Said sheds some light.

Bismillah-ir Rahman-ir Raheem

“Allah Guides to His Light Whom He Wills.” (Surah An-Nur)

Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) has blessed everything with the Baraka and Nur of Rasulullah ﷺ, but from places, there is one city, one place, one piece of land that whenever we go back to it we become lost in its aja’ib (wonders):  Madinah!

Maybe it is because Rasulullah ﷺ make dua for Madinah more than double that of Ibrahim (alaih salam) for Makkah.

But why did Rasulullah  love Madinah?  Rasulullah  loved its people, its land, its sand and its fruits; but why Madinah?

Why did Rasulullah  make the sign of iman connected to loving the Ansar (the people of Madinah), and one of the biggest signs of nifaq (hypocrisy) in disliking or hating them?

Why did Rasulullah ﷺ threaten anyone who targets Madinah with any harm to be dissolved like salt in water?

Why did Rasulullah ﷺ curse the one who commits a crime in Madinah or the one who tries any evil design on Madinah or its people?

Why did Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) not make another  portion of Rawdat-ul Jannah (garden of paradise) for Rasulullah  in any place other than Madinah?

Why did Rasulullah tell us that Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) made the ajwa of Madinah (a special date) a protection, shifa’a and cure from sihr (black magic) and poison?  Why not any other ajwa?  Why?

Why did Rasulullahﷺ say that the land and the sand of Madinah isshifa’a?  Why did Rasulullahﷺ that even the dust is shifa’a!?  Rasulullah ﷺ upon his arrival of Madinah used to uncover his face to the dust of Madinah, as if it were the air-conditioning or freshening agents we enjoy in this time!

Why did Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) choose the people of Baqi to be the first to be resurrected?

Why did Rasulullahﷺ say that he would be the intercessor for everyone who dies in Madinah?

Why did Heﷺ encourage people to die in Madinah?

Why does Madinah have more than one-hundred names?  It is said that the number of names that something possesses is a sign of its greatness!

Why did Rasulullahﷺ stay in Makkah for thirteen years and a numbered set of people became Muslim, but when he went to Madinah, the people of Madinah received him and believed in him?

Why did Rasulullahﷺ say during the Battle of Hunan to Syedina Abbas (radiallah anhu) to call the Ansar, His Family, and the people of Bayt-ul Ridwan?  Why did Rasulullahﷺ call the Ansar?

Why did Rasulullahﷺ say that if everyone was to go one direction and the Ansar were to take a different direction that He would take the direction of the Ansar?  Why?

Why did Rasulullahﷺ say to the Ansar that should it not make you happy that others live with money, camels and sheep, but your life is with Rasulullahﷺ?

Why did Rasulullahﷺ say that Uhud is a mountain that He loves and Uhud loves Him?  Why Uhud and why not any other mountain?

Whenever we visit Madinah, we do not want to leave!  Every corner of every part of Madinah has attached with it emotions, feelings and things that can be seen that no one can imagine or dare describe.

In Madinah, you cry, read, smile and you even forget to rest!  Maybe because all of the barakat that was given to this City, and it is suffices that Rasulullahﷺcalled this city “Al Madinah”, “the City!”  When Rasulullahﷺ called it “the City” then that means after that there is no city other than Al Madinah, and that indeed that is the real city.

Al Madinah is a direction.  When Madinah is mentioned, the heart of the mu’min flutters to this City.

Al Madinah is also “Munawarah”.  For the people that Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) has opened the Nur for, they see this City belit!  Zaid ibn Thabit (radiallah anhu) said that when Rasulullahﷺ came to Madinah, every corner end every street became Nur, and when he departed, everything became dark.  These are the people that do not see except with the eyes of Nur and baseera(insight).  Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) said in Surah Al-Hajj (46):  “Indeed it is not the sight that goes blind, but rather it is the heart that goes blind.”  Zaid ibn Thabit (radiallah anhu) is telling us that the people of Madinah were the people who saw Nur, in each and every corner what they saw was Nur!

May Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) make us from the people of Madinah, end our life in Madinah, and may He make us from the people of Baqi, from the people of the Rawdah, from the people of Uhud and the Shuhudah of Uhud.

May Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) fill us with the love of Rasulullah (sallallahu alayhi wasalam), the Ansar, the Muhajireen, the Ahlul Bayt, the Sahaba and all the Saliheen.

May Allah (subhana wa ta’ala) make this a year of Rahma and hidayah (guidance).

2 Muharram 1438

Al Madinah Al Munawarah

 Shaykh Faid Mohammed Said

Resources for Seekers

Why We Must Behave Decently Towards People – Shaykh Faid Said

In the aftermath of the July 2016 bombing in Medina, Saudia Arabia, Shaykh Faid Mohammed Said says we have an important and active choice to make. We can choose to speak with good and act with good in an attempt to be part of the solution amidst all the chaos and madness.

Shaykh Faid Said - Behave Decently With PeopleShaykh Faid Mohammed Said is a jewel in the crown of traditional Islamic scholarship in the United Kingdom and we at SeekersHub are ever grateful for his friendship, guidance and support. He was born in Asmara, Eritrea, where he studied the holy Qur’an and its sciences, Arabic grammar and fiqh under the guidance of the Grand Judge of the Islamic Court in Asmara, Shaykh Abdul Kader Hamid and also under the Grand Mufti of Eritrea. He later went to study at Madinah University, from which he graduated with a first class honours degree. In Madinah, his teachers included Shaykh Atia Salem, Shaykh Mohamed Ayub (ex-imam of the Prophet’s Mosque, peace be upon him), Professor AbdulRaheem, Professor Yaqub Turkestani, Shaykh Dr Awad Sahli, Dr Aa’edh Al Harthy and many other great scholars. Shaykh Faid has ijaza in a number of disciplines including hadith, and a British higher education teaching qualification. He is currently the scholar in residence and head of education at Harrow Central Mosque, United Kingdom.
Read his articles on the SeekersHub blog.

Resources for seekers:

Medina Bombing: Where WE Stand & Why We Must State It Clearly, by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani


In an unprecedented escalation of events, an explosion has occured close to the Prophet Muhammad’s ﷺ mosque in Medina, allegedly detonated by a suicide bomber. The Medina bombing comes at the heels of the devastating violence in Iraq, Turkey and Bangladesh in recent weeks. Shaykh Faraz Rabbani makes it clear: where do we stand on such events and should we speak out?

Resources for seekers:

The Plague Within: Shaykh Hamza Yusuf on the Roots of Violent Extremism

Vigilante acts of violence have killed hundreds around the world in the last few days. Shaykh Hamza Yusuf writes plainly on the dark and destructive ideology which underpins groups like ISIS and their sympathisers.

According to a good hadith related by Ahmad and al-Tabarani, the Messenger of God, may God’s peace and blessings be upon him, said, “You will never believe until you show mercy to one another.”
“All of us are merciful, O Messenger of God!” his companions responded.
The Prophet, God’s peace and blessings upon him, explained, “I’m not talking about one of you showing mercy to his friend; I’m talking about universal mercy—mercy towards everyone.”
For those Muslims and people of other faiths who lost loved ones in the recent tragedies in Baghdad two days ago, in Bangladesh last Friday, in Istanbul the day before that, in Lebanon earlier last week, and in Yemen and Orlando last month, I am deeply saddened and can only offer my prayers, even as I am painfully aware of my state of utter helplessness at what has befallen our global community. As I write this, I learned about yet another bombing outside our beloved Prophet’s mosque in Medina, as believers were about to break their fast yesterday, unjustly killing four innocent security guards. Fortunately, due to the blessings of the place, the sound of the explosion was thought to be the boom of the cannon used to announce the time has come to break the fast, so the people in the mosque were not frightened nor panicked. The Prophet, God’s peace and blessings upon him, said, “Whoever frightens the people of Medina has the damnation of God, the angels, and all of humanity.” Needless to say, the horror of these atrocities is compounded because they are being carried out—intentionally—in the blessed month of Ramadan.

A faith-eating plague

A plague is upon us, and it has its vectors. Like the brain-eating amoebas that have struck the warm waters of the Southern states in America, a faith-eating plague has been spreading across the global Muslim community. This insidious disease has a source, and that source must be identified, so we can begin to inoculate our communities against it.
New versions of our ancient faith have sprung up and have infected the hearts and minds of countless young people across the globe. Imam Adel Al-Kalbani, who led prayers in the Haram of Mecca for several years, has publicly stated that these youth are the bitter harvest of teachings that have emanated from pulpits throughout the Arabian Peninsula, teachings that have permeated all corners of the world, teachings that focus on hatred, exclusivity, provincialism, and xenophobia. These teachings anathematize any Muslim who does not share their simple-minded, literalist, anti-metaphysical, primitive, and impoverished form of Islam, and they reject the immense body of Islamic scholarship from the luminaries of our tradition.

The spread of this ideology

Due to a sophisticated network of funding, these teachings have flooded bookstores throughout the Muslim world and even in America, Europe, and Australia. For a case study of what they have spawned, we might look to Kosovo. Our “Islamic” schools are now filled with books published by this sect that lure the impressionable minds of our youth at an age when they are most susceptible to indoctrination. This sect of Islam, however, is not the sole source of our current crisis, and it would be wrong to place all blame on it alone; many of its adherents are peace-loving quietists, who want only to be left alone to practice their faith as they see fit. Their exclusivism is a necessary but not sufficient cause for the xenophobic hatred that leads to such violence. The terroristic Islamists are a hybrid of an exclusivist takfiri version of the above and the political Islamist ideology that has permeated much of the Arab and South Asian world for the last several decades. It is this marriage made in hell that must be understood in order to fully grasp the calamitous situation we find our community in. While the role that Western interventions and misadventures in the region have played in creating this quagmire should not be set aside, diminished, or denied, we should, however, keep in mind that Muslims have been invaded many times in the past yet never reacted like these fanatics. Historically, belligerent enemies often admired the nobility Muslims displayed in their strict adherence to history’s first humane rules of engagement that were laid down by the Prophet himself to insure that mercy was never completely divorced from the callousness of conflict.
We need to clearly see the pernicious and pervasive nature of this ideological plague and how it is responsible for the chaos and terror spreading even to the city of our Prophet, God’s peace and blessings upon him, in all its inviolability. Its most vulnerable victims are our disaffected youth who often live in desolate circumstances with little hope for their futures. Promises of paradise and easy-out strategies from the weariness of this world have enticed these suicidal youth to express their pathologies in the demonically deceptive causes of “Islamic” radicalism. The pictures they leave behind—showing the supercilious smiles on their faces, even as they hold in their hapless hands their Western-made assault rifles—are testament to the effective brainwashing taking place.

Normative voices drowned out

The damage being wrought is not only within Islam but also to Islam’s good name in the eyes of the world. These now daily occurrences of destructive, hate-filled violence are beginning to drown out the voices of normative Islam, thereby cultivating a real hatred in the hearts of those outside our communities. In the minds of many around the world, Islam, once considered a great world religion, is being reduced to an odious political ideology that threatens global security; that, in turn, is proving disastrous for minority Muslim communities, who now abide in increasingly hostile environments in secular societies.

Counter-voices of scholars and activists

What we need to counter this plague are the voices of scholars, as well as grassroots activists, who can begin to identify the real culprits behind this fanatical ideology. What we do not need are more voices that veil the problem with empty, hollow, and vacuous arguments that this militancy has little to do with religion; it has everything to do with religion: misguided, fanatical, ideological, and politicized religion. It is the religion of resentment, envy, powerlessness, and nihilism. It does, however, have nothing to do with the merciful teachings of our Prophet, God’s peace and blessings upon him. Unchecked, we will see this plague foment more such violence, until one day, God forbid, these hateful and vile adherents obtain a nuclear device, the use of which has already been sanctioned by their “scholars,” including one currently imprisoned in Saudi Arabia. If such a scenario unfolds, it is highly probable that the full wrath of Western powers will be unleashed upon a helpless Muslim world that would make even the horrendous Mongol invasions of the 13th century look like a stroll in the park.

“To flee from calamities is the Sunnah of Prophets”

Invariably, some will remark that a fear of Western retaliation is a sign of cowardice. For those zealots, I would recommend turning back to the Qur’an, specifically to reflect on the undeniably brave Messenger Moses, peace be upon him, who unintentionally killed an Egyptian after striking him with his powerful blow, only because he was considered an enemy, and then asked God’s forgiveness and “fled vigilantly out of fear” (28:21). This is a cautionary tale, and it behooves all of us to reflect upon it as a lesson of what not to do when oppressed, especially when we are without political authority or the means to redress our grievances. Imam al-Sahrwardi stated, “To flee from calamities is the Sunnah of Prophets.” It is best not to let our baser self, our lust for revenge, get the better of us.
We would do well to acknowledge that much of what is happening in the Muslim world and to Muslim communities in the West is from what our own hands have wrought. Muslims have been in the West for a long time and have done little to educate people here about our faith; too many of us have been occupied in our wordly affairs, while some of our mosques and schools have been breeding grounds for an ideological Islamism rather than Islam. The Qur’an clearly instructs us that when faced with calamities, we ought to look first at what we may have done to bring them upon us. Introspection is a Qur’anic injunction. Until we come to terms with this Qur’anic truth, we will remain mired in the mirage of denial, always pointing fingers in every direction but at ourselves. “Verily, God does not change the conditions of a people until they change themselves” (Qur’an, 13:11).
As Ramadan comes to a close, let us pray for the oppressed and the guidance of the oppressors, for those who have been killed, and for those who lost their loved ones, and most of all, let us heed our Prophet’s call and want mercy for everyone.

Resources for seekers:

Lessons From Medina – The Creed, Politics, and Ethics of Islam

When the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) entered Yathrib, it was renamed ‘Medina’, meaning ‘city’. This change marked the beginning of a shift of focus in revelation; the foundations of faith laid in Mecca would now rapidly take on many new pillars of outward practice. In other words, the city of Medina would become a manifestation of the inward beliefs of the Early Muslims – personally, and civilizationally.

In this talk, Shaykh Faraz Khan of Zaytuna College discusses the three changes that the Prophet (May Allah bless him and give him peace) used to transform Yathrib: the building of the mosque, the brotherhood between the Muslims, and the treaty with those of other faiths.

Hajj – A Reader – For Those Blessed With The Pilgrimage

Dhul Hijja, the month of Hajj, is fast approaching. Hundreds and thousands of blessed Muslims are packing their bags, checking their travel documents and flocking to airports around the world, to make the journey to Mecca, Saudi Arabia.
This brief document is a resource for those travelling for Hajj this year, or any year. It provides links to questions that have been answered by SeekersGuidance scholars, blog posts written about the pilgrimage, and relevant information pertaining to Hajj.
Videos and Blog Posts:
Video: Preparing for Hajj – Habib Faisal-Alkaff – Radical Middle Way
Hajj Handbook – Shaykh Husain Abdul Sattar …
Video: Hajj Reflections – Radical Middle Way …
The Hajj Collection – Shaykh Abdal Hakim …
Ten Good Manners for Hajj by Imam al-Ghazali …
The Gifts of Hajj – Radical Middle Way – Blog
Imam al-Haddad’s Counsels on Hajj and `Umrah – Muwasala
Video: Fast the 9th (‘Arafa) and Live for Another Year – Mufti Abdur Rahman ibn Yusuf
On the Path to a Sacred Journey: The Courtesies (Adab) of Hajj – Nur Sacred Sciences
From Our Answers Page:
Removing Hair and Wearing Scents: Expiations for Accidental Violations of Ihram during Hajj
Does Allah Forgive Marital Infidelity When You Make Hajj?
Missing the Farewell Tawaf Due to Menstruation
Calculating Zakat and Going on Hajj with a Student Loan
Is It Valid to Make Hajj or Umrah Before One’s Parents?
Seeking Forgiveness from Others Before Hajj
Hajj Tamattu`: Does an Invalid Umra Affect the Hajj?
What is the Wisdom Behind Doing Certain Hajj and Umrah Rituals 7 Times?
Reciting Sura al-Baraqara for Protection and Cutting One’s Hair for Hajj and Umrah
What Are the Rulings of Performing Tawaf, Sa’y, and Prayer While Carrying a Baby With Dirty Diapers (Nappies)?
Question on Hajj Violations
Going On Hajj While in Debt
Can a Man Perform Hajj on Behalf of a Non-Mahram Woman?
Is Foreplay a Violation On Hajj?
Wearing Stitched Clothing in Ihram: What Kind of Expiation is Due?
Should I Delay Hajj to Help Fund a Sibling’s Wedding?
Doubts About Having Committed a Contravention at Hajj
Chronic Excuse: Can I Combine Prayers with a Single Ablution?
What is the Minimum Amount of Hair that Must Be Cut to Exit the State of Ihram After Hajj or Umrah?
The Day of `Arafah: The 9th of Dhu’l Hijjah and the Takbirs of Eid
Removing Hair and Wearing Scents: Expiations for Accidental Violations of Ihram during Hajj
Appointing Someone to Perform Hajj on Someone’s Behalf
Can I Wear Stitched Footgear, Belts, or a Backpack While in Ihram?
Can Women Wear Ornaments While Performing Umrah?
How Long Must One Stay at Arafat During Hajj?
The Tawafs of Hajj

Recommended Viewing:

Imam Tahir’s DVD / CD set on Hajj http://www.falahproductions.com/dvd.php

Lessons from a Medina Graveyard with Photos – Fahad Faruqui – HuffingtonPost

Lessons from a Medina Graveyard with Photos – Fahad Faruqui – HuffingtonPost

One can learn many lessons at a graveyard. I once found myself helping carry the corpse of a stranger, an old woman, to its final abode. At the time, I was a 20-year-old on a family trip to the Holy City of Medina in Saudi Arabia.

Following the ish’a (night) prayers at the Prophet’s Mosque (Al-Masjid al-Nabawi) and the recitation of obligatory funeral prayer, I came across a middle-aged man searching for help to transport the coffin of the woman, who I later learned was his mother. She had passed away a few hours earlier and her son was eager to fulfill her final wish: to be buried immediately after death.

The son was the only family member present. He was anxious to hastily transport the steel coffin, containing the corpse of his mother wrapped in a white shroud, to the Garden of Heaven or, as it is called in Arabic, Janatu l-Baqi’, a graveyard adjacent to the Prophet’s Mosque. (Photos of the Prophet’s Mosque and the Garden of Heaven are below.)

Since it was late at night, the mosque had emptied quickly and there weren’t many eager beavers to lend a hand. A few men on their way out of the mosque regrettably declined the man’s pleas for assistance, saying they had far travel before reaching home. I wanted to help, but I was unsure if I would be able to carry the coffin all the way to the grave situated a couple of hundred meters away.

After a handful of men gathered to move the coffin, four men including me lifted it in unison and rested each corner on the shoulder. As we proceeded toward the graveyard, the coffin was tilted toward my side since I was relatively shorter than the other three.

“She isn’t heavy,” I thought to myself in relief.

A man behind me yelled blessings to the dead as we commenced our walk towards the Medina graveyard. We all joined in enthusiastically, chanting blessings to the dead.

Our voices started to get dimmer as we ran out of breath. The farther we moved away from the mosque, the darker it became. In the sunlight, the sands of Medina graveyard vary in color from orange to a shade that borders on red, with volcanic rocks scattered throughout the grave marking the grave. But at night, it was pitch-black. Our pathway was lit only by the light illuminating from the towering minarets atop the mosque, where Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings be upon him, rests along with Abu Bakr, the first caliph, and Umar ibn Al-Khattab, the second caliph, may God be pleased with both.

After a few uneven steps, the buckle of one of my sandal’s broke, forcing me to push it aside as we continued forward. The ground was warm, even at this late hour. I could barely see where my feet were stepping in the wide graveyard around us. I was granted some relief when a man volunteered to help, seeking only reward from the Creator.

We walked aimlessly for a bit, trying our best not to trample over the other graves as we searched for the woman’s resting spot. Once we located it and rested the coffin beside the dugout, I took a peak at the grave. It was remarkably dark — the darkest shade of black that I have ever seen.

As I stood among these strangers with death before my eyes, and a six-foot deep grave that felt suffocating from above, the importance of my worries drifted away, and I began reflecting on the temporality of life.

It dawned on me how near we are all to death, our inevitable fate, although many of us think about death very rarely.

Quite out of the blue, I felt I was granted clues and answers to questions that had been filling my mind: Why am I here? And where will I go from here?

I had little to no sense of time. My startled parents went out looking for me when they saw all the doors of the Prophet’s Mosque closed from the window of our hotel room. I arrived back at the hotel more than an hour later than usual, yet the impression the experience left on me has been lasting. It was a moment of clarity, an hour that changed the very foundation of my existence.

“A moment of true reflection is worth more than ages of heedless worship,” Faraz Rabbani, a leading Islamic scholar, said recently on Twitter.

His words reminded me of that night. At certain points in our lives, we have experiences that shake us to the core and compel us to question our outlook on existence and, if we cultivate them properly, bring us nearer to the Almighty. Even many years later, in times when anger, distress, tribulation or temptation has attempted to sway me, my mind returns to that graveyard.

When you become mindful of death, you think and act differently. It becomes difficult to lash out in anger when we know how near death could be. A person conscious of death would think twice before defrauding and deceiving another human being.

By remembering that we will all perish and be buried in dirt, taking none of our possessions with us, it becomes undesirable to wrong or hurt someone intentionally. But one has to realize that death is inevitable.

My recollection of the funeral procession that night is vivid. I remember how time seized for me in the midst of that graveyard. I recall the haunting feeling of suffocation and discomfort that kept me awake that night.

Back in the hotel, as I rested my head on the plush pillow, in an arctic air-conditioned room, I thought of the rock-hard walls encircling that meager grave.

We need not reflect on death at all times to keep us on track. Paying attention to life — to the wondrous creations of the universe around us — can always draw us near to God and prompt us to be grateful. But also reflect on death, since it turns you away from the superficiality of the world and curbs your ego.

I would not say I am a man of immense knowledge. I haven’t spent an adequate amount of time fully uncovering the miracles of the Quran as deeply as I should. I have my ups and down. My faith, at times, dangles, and then I have to realign my thoughts. It happens more often than I am ready to confess here.

Yet I find remembering the inevitability of death from time to time is one way to stay grounded. During a course on Buddhist ethics I took a decade ago with Robert Thurman, the professor related a tale of a newlywed royal couple who went to a celebrated monk, Atisha, for marriage advice.

Initially hesitating to offer any since he had never been married himself, the monk finally yielded, giving some of the soundest marital advice I have heard: “Eventually, husband and wife, each will die. So now while alive, you should strive to be kind to each other.”

Thoughts of death need not flood our minds with sorrow and negativity, as we should understand that death is a natural part of the journey of life.

If we work on making every prayer count as if it’s our last and set aside time from our busy schedules, including the social media that consumes a measurable chunk of our day, to unwind the thoughts and worries entangled in our minds, we may become better humans and will indeed have a greater chance of living with peace.

Click here to view the Photos