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10 Ways of Benefit for Menstruating Women in Ramadan

Dread your period during the blessed month of Ramadan? Feel like you’re missing out on all the worship you could otherwise do? As Nour Merza writes, there is much to look forward to.

Every Ramadan, most women will have about a week in which they are unable to join in the major religious practices of the holy month: fasting and praying. Many women, when their menstrual period begins, find that their level of engagement with the high spiritual atmosphere of the month drops. The same goes for those whose postnatal bleeding coincides with Ramadan. For many of these women, frustration and a sense of lacking spirituality sets in.

This, however, shouldn’t be the case.

Menstruation, postnatal bleeding, and other uniquely feminine concerns are all part of Allah’s creation, which He created in perfect wisdom. They are not a punishment for women wanting to draw near their Lord. They are just part of the special package of blessings, opportunities and challenges that God has given uniquely to women. To refrain from ritual prayer (the salaat) and ritual fasting (the sawm) during this time is actually considered a form of worship, and, if done with the intention of obeying God, it earns women good deeds.

In order to take full advantage of the blessed month of Ramadan, however, menstruating women and those with postnatal bleeding can do more than refraining from ritual prayer and ritual fasting to draw near God. Below are ten ways that women unable to fast can boost their spirituality during this special month.

menstruating women in Ramadan

1. Increase dhikr

In the Hanafi school, it is recommended for menstruating women to make wudu, wear their prayer clothes, and sit on their prayer mat while doing dhikr during the time they would normally be praying. This would be especially good to do in Ramadan, a time of special focus on worship. In addition to the adhkar that are well-known sunnas – such subhanAllah, alhamdullillah and Allahu akbar – if you have a litany from a shaykh and are allowed to repeat it more than once a day, try to do it twice or three times for increased blessings. Dhikr has a special way of touching the heart, and by invoking God’s names whenever you can during this unique month you create the space, inshaAllah, for beautiful spiritual openings. See: The Effects of Various Dhikr – Habib Ahmad Mashhur al-Haddad

2. Increase du’aa

Du’aa is something we do very little of these days, but speaking directly to your Lord is one of the most intimate ways to connect with Him. The beauty of du’aa is that you can make it in any place or time. Take this opportunity to ask your Lord for all that you need in your life, and to draw near Him through either repeating the beautiful du’aas of the Prophet or reaching out to God with your own unique words. See: Ten Powerful Du’as That Will Change Your Life

3. Feed others

Whether it be your family, neighbors, community members or the poor, use the time you are not fasting to make meals that fill the stomachs and souls of those around you. Recite the salawat on the Prophet (pbuh) while making the food, as this imbues the food with spiritual benefit as well. Consider sponsoring iftar at your local mosque one evening with some other women who are in your situation, or volunteering at a local soup kitchen.  See also: “Manifesting Mercy: Feeding Your Way to God” – Nader Khan at Brampton Islamic Centre.

4. Gain Islamic knowledge

Use the extra time and energy you have from not fasting and praying to increase your knowledge of the faith. Listen to scholars discussing timely issues on our SeekersHub podcasts, form a small circle of non-fasting women who can commit to reading a book on Islam and discuss it together, or take some time to read articles on the religion from trusted online sources, such as Shaykh Hamza Yusuf’s blog or Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad’s article collection at masud.co.uk. See also: Importance of Intention in Seeking Knowledge.

5. Increase your charity

We are surrounded by countless blessings, so make sure to spread those blessings in the month of Ramadan. Give money to a good cause, such as supporting Syrian refugees, helping a local poor family with school fees, or supporting students of Islamic knowledge through programs like SeekersHub’s #SpreadLight campaign. In a very busy world, we may have little opportunity to give our time to help others in charity – giving money takes minimal time, but brings great benefit. See: Eligible Zakat Recipients, Giving Locally vs. Abroad, Charity to a Mosque, and Proper Handling of Donations.

6. Make your responsibilities a form of worship

Sometimes, women are overwhelmed by the responsibilities of the home and young children, and cannot make time to do things like study or sponsor an iftar. In these circumstances, renew your intention regarding your role as a mother and a wife. See these demanding and time-consuming roles for what they are: responsibilities that you are fulfilling to please God, which makes them a type of worship. Ask God to accept all your work as worship, and approach all that you do in this way. This will make even the most mundane of tasks, such as changing another diaper, cleaning up  another spilled cup of apple juice, or making yet another dinner a way for you to gain the pleasure of your Lord. See: Balancing Worship and Caring for a New Child.

7. Listen to the Quran

menstruating women in Ramadan

Although the Hanafi schools holds that women cannot cannot touch the mushaf or recite Quran while experiencing menses or postpartum bleeding, they are able to listen to the recitation of the Quran. Doing so offers much benefit in a month that has such heavy emphasis on reciting the book. You can take special time out of your day to listen to it, such as while children are napping, or you can listen to it while in the midst of cooking or cleaning the house. See also: Listening to Qur’an While Occupied With Other Tasks

8. Increase Repentance

Ramadan is an excellent time to increase repentance to God. Use moments when others are praying or breaking their fast to ask God to forgive you and your loved ones and to keep you from returning to sin. All we have is a gift from Allah, so even forgetting that for a moment is a deed worth asking forgiveness from. Know that God is the Forgiving, and trust that, as our scholars have said, the moment you ask for forgiveness you are truly forgiven. See also: Damaged Inner State? Imam Ghazali on Repentance

9. Babysit to help mothers worship

Mothers with young children often find it difficult to go to the mosque because they worry that their kids will disturb others who are praying. Since you don’t need to be at the mosque, volunteer a night or two (or more!) to babysit the children of a young mother who would love to go pray taraweeh. If you have young children of your own, you can tell the mother to bring her kids to your house before the prayer. By helping this woman worship, you will gain the same good deeds she gets from going to that prayer. See: I Love Being A Woman!

10. Spread love and light

Use the extra time and energy you have to share the joys of Ramadan and Eid with your non-Muslim friends, peers and neighbors. Invite a work colleague for an iftar, make a special Ramadan dish and give it to a neighbor, or take time to make special cookies or gift bags for peers at the office or in school to hand out during Eid. By sharing these happy moments with friends and colleagues in the non-Muslim community, you counter the negative narratives about Islam in the media. More than that, however, you become someone who creates bonds in an increasingly isolated world, reflecting the beauty of the Prophetic light to all those around you. See: How Can Muslims Become More Effective Community Members?

Cover photo by Edward Musiak. Tasbih photo by Brian Jeffery Beggerly. Quran photo by Mohmed Althani.

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Is My Umra Valid?

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat is asked about the validity of Umra if a sister has doubts about purity.

I went on Umra during my period. My periods stop on the sixth day, but this time it didn’t stop until the thirteenth day. On the twelfth day I went and did Umra, thinking I am now in istihada [period of abnormal bleeding], and did tawaf and sa’i [moving back and forth between Safa and Marwa] after entering tuhr [a state of purity] and making wudu.

Yet I am still doubtful whether I was right or wrong. Please help me and answer my question. And if I was wrong please tell me what to do.

I pray you are well.

Your Umra was valid – provided you were able to remain in a state of wudu during your tawaf. If not, you need to sacrifice a sheep in Mecca.

Continuation Of Blood

If bleeding persists after the number of days you usually see it – 7, for example – you should not pray your prayers as there is a chance that the number of days you menstrual cycle lasts may change. If it stops before ten full days then this is your new cycle – 9, for example.

If, however, it continues past ten days then you assume that your menstrual cycle lasted the original number of days (7) and everything else was istihada. This means you all have to repeat the missed prayers from the day of the cycle ending until the point you realized the bleeding was istihada.

(Birgivi, Dhukhr al-Mutaʾahhilin; Kasani, Badaʾiʿ al-Sanaʾiʿ).

May Allah grant you the best of both worlds.

Abdul-Rahim

Using a Menstrual Cup

Shaykh Jamir Meah is asked about the permissibility of using menstrual cups.

I would like to ask a question regarding menstrual cups and if a Hanafi women can use one while on her period. Menstrual cups are inserted into the vagina to collect blood and can be re-used which makes them very eco-friendly and better for the environment than disposable sanitary products. Is it permissible to use it in any of the four schools of thought?

Thank you for your question.

In the Shafi‘i school, tampons, cotton wool inserts (hashu), and by extension, menstrual cups, are permitted to use (without dislike), during menstruation or abnormal vaginal bleeding (istihada). At times, using the above maybe be obligatory. This is irrespective of whether the woman is a virgin or not. (Al-Hawashi al Madaniyya, Tuhfat al-Muhtaj)

In the Hanafi school, using a tampon and it’s similar would be disliked (makruh) and best to avoid, especially for unmarried women. For more details on the Hanafi position, please refer to this comprehensive answer.

Scholars of both schools hold that if there is a proven harm in using the tampon for women (and likewise the menstrual cup), then it would be impermissible to use it, and a safe alternative must be found.

Warmest salams,

Jamir

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.

Can a Woman Enter the Kitchen During Her Menses?

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I entered in the kitchen and my mom shouted at me and said you cannot enter in the kitchen while in your periods.

Is it allowed for a women to enter in the kitchen at that time?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum assalam,

There is no harm in entering the kitchen, eating and drinking, or cooking while a women is menstruating.

The Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) went to lengths to remove any stigma regarding menstruation, and any ideas that people had of a menstruating woman being physically filthy or impure: Sayyiduna Anas (Allah be well pleased with him) narrates that the Jews of Medina used to not eat with menstruating women or be in the same room as them, and that the Prophetic Companions ask the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and grant him peace) about that. Thereat, Allah Most High send down the verse: And they ask you about menstruation. Say, ‘It is harm, so keep away from wives during menstruation … [2:222] He explained to them saying, ‘Do with them any besides intercourse.’ [Muslim and others]

He (Allah bless him and grant him peace) would recite the Quran resting his noble head in his menstruating wife’s lap and he would sleep in the same bed as her. [Bukhari] He would even eat from the selfsame part of a piece of meat that his menstruating wife was just eating from. [Muslim]

All of this tells us that a menstruating woman is not filthy nor does she have to avoid any activities save certain intimate relations with her spouse, and certain acts of worship.

As for reciting the Fatiha, or anything else of Quran, one cannot do so until one finishes one’s menses and makes ghusl. This is because of the hadith in Tirmidhi and others, ‘Let no one in ritual impurity or menstruation recite anything of the Quran.’ [al-Talkhis al-Habir, weak] However, in the Shafi’i school, if you are reciting the Fatiha, or anything else of Quran, by way of a dua or seeking protection, it is permissible during menses. [Minhaj al-Talibin] So, for example, if it is one’s habit to recite the Fatiha over the food you cook so as to bless the food, that would be permissible.

I pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed.

Can I Memorize the Qur’an After Masturbating During My Menstruation?

Answered by Shaykh Umer Mian

Question: Assalamu alaykum

If a woman masturbated without penetration during her period can she still memorize and recite the Qur’an before she is able to perform a ritual bath?

Also does touching oneself sexually while menstruating necessitate an expiation?

Answer: Asalamu alaikum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuhu

Short answer:

1) If the woman achieved orgasm and sexual fluid exited, then she enters a state of major ritual impurity due to the exiting of sexual fluid with desire. Hence, she cannot touch the Qur’an nor recite it, even for the purpose of memorizing. Furthermore, the Maliki rukhsa (dispensation) cannot be applied in this situation.

2) Expiation (kaffarah) is only related to intentionally breaking one’s fast in Ramadan. If a person intentionally breaks their Ramadan fast by masturbating, no expiation is due. However, the person is sinful and the fast must be made up.

Detailed answer:

First of all, in the Maliki madhab, it has been deemed permissible for a woman to recite Qur’an while on her menstrual cycle. This is because the menstrual cycle is a reoccurring habit that lasts for days and a woman is not able to remove this state. Hence, it has been deemed an undue hardship for her to refrain from reciting the Qur’an for days (al-Ishraf ‘ala masaa’il al-khilaf, Qadi Abdul Wahhab). Some followers of other madhabs take a rukhsa (dispensation) from the Maliki madhab and follow this position to allow for women to maintain their memorization of Qur’an, even while menstruating.

Secondly, Allah Most High says:

“ …those who guard their private parts, save from their wives or [bondwomen] whom their right hands own, for these are not blameworthy. But whoever seeks beyond that, those are the transgressors.” (23:5-7)

Masturbation is included in the words of Allah Most High, “beyond that,” and hence it is a major sin. Some narrations indicate that the one who commits this sin and fails to repent will be cursed and Allah will not gaze upon them on the Day of Judgment.

Thirdly, the well-known fiqhi principle states:

الضرورات تتقدّر بقدرها

“Dire needs are only given consideration to the extent of the need.” In the specific situation being asked about, a woman has gone beyond the established need (i.e. menstrual cycle) and committed a major sin, i.e. masturbation. If the woman achieved orgasm and sexual fluid exited, then she enters a state of major ritual impurity due to the exiting of sexual fluid with desire. There is no rukhsa nor permissibility for this in the Hanafi, Maliki, or Shafi’i madhabs. The Maliki rukhsa (dispensation) to allow for women to memorize Qur’an while menstruating is no longer valid to be followed in this state. Hence, she cannot touch the Qur’an nor recite it, even for the purpose of memorizing.

Furthermore, she should repent from this sin and take the means to prevent it from recurring. This includes:

– Guarding one’s gaze;
– Staying away from fitna;
– Asking Allah continually to free one from this problem;
– Involving oneself with acts of worship, dhikr, and service of the religion;
– Fasting;
– Removing the haram and doubtful from one’s life, especially in terms of food, money, and household “family sins” [television, free mixing, etc.]
– Whenever feeling overwhelmed with one’s physical temptation to fulfill a lawful lust (food, etc.) to calm down one’s nafs. This was mentioned by Sayyidi Abd al-Ghani al-Nabulsi from Shaykh al-Akbar (Allah sanctify their
secrets).

Finally, it appears that by “expiration” you meant to say “expiation.” Expiation (kaffarah) is only related to intentionally breaking one’s fast in Ramadan. Even in that case, expiation is only due when one breaks one’s Ramadan fast by intentionally eating, drinking, or performing sexual intercourse. If a person intentionally breaks their Ramadan fast by masturbating, a makeup of the fast is due, but no expiation is due.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Umer Mian

What Should I Do If My Menstruation Ends Right Before Maghrib Time? [Habib Umar]

Answered by  Habib Umar bin Hafiz

Question: Assalam aleykum

A women became pure from her monthly cycle. She made up her Dhuhr prayer first (qada). While she was still making up her Dhuhr, Maghrib time came in. What is the ruling on that?

Answer: [Assalam alaykum]

There will be no sin on her. She should make up Asr after she prays Maghrib.

This is an important issue. If a woman becomes pure at Asr time, even if it’s towards the end of Asr time, it becomes necessary (wajib) for her to make up Zuhr as well as pray Asr. Likewise, if she becomes pure at the end of Isha time, making up Maghrib also becomes wajib. This is because Zuhr and Asr are considered connected, and Maghrib and Isha are also considered connected as they both can be combined with each other at times.

Because of this, if a woman reaches purity towards the end of Asr time, she should pray Asr as well as make up Dhuhr. If she reaches purity towards the end of Isha time she should perform Isha as well as make up Maghrib. This sister in question was making up Zuhr when Maghrib time came in. Therefore she should make up Asr after she prays Maghrib.

However what is better in any similar scenario when time is tight is that she should first pray the prayer of the current prayer time. In this case she should have prayed Asr first and then she should have made up Dhuhr after Maghrib.

Habib Umar bin Hafiz  is a descendant of the Prophet (upon him be Allah’s peace and blessings). Born into a family of scholars, Habib Umar, pursued the sacred sciences from a young age, including Quran, Hadith, Fiqh, ‘Aqeedah, Arabic, and Spirituality. In 1994, he established Dar al-Mustafa, an educational institute in Tarim, Yemem.

Link to the original answer

Translator: Areeba B

What Should I Do After Fasting During Menstruation? (Habib Umar)

Answered by  Habib Umar bin Hafiz

Question: Assalam aleykum

A 14-year-old girl menstruated during the past Ramadan without performing the purificatory bath. She fasted Ramadan not realizing that it was a menstrual period. Upon realization, is she required to make up the fast?

Answer: [Assalam alaykum]

If she did not perform the purificatory bath after her menstrual period had ended, then the prayers she performed before having performed a purificatory bath would be invalid. Thus, prayers that were performed between the end of her menstrual period and the purificatory bath would need to be made up, since she prayed without being in a state of ritual purity.

As for her fasting, if she fasted during her menstrual period, it would be invalid and would need to be made up. However, if she fasted while not menstruating, such fasting would remain valid, despite being in a state of ritual impurity for not having yet performed the purificatory bath. This is because the purificatory bath is not a condition for fasting. Fasting becomes obligatory merely once the menstrual period ends.

This serves as a reminder for our shortcoming when it comes to the obligation of female education. On a related note, many girls become legally responsible through menstruation. For example, they may be 13 or 14 years old, not perform the fast, and not be instructed by their family to do so. She would thus be sinful and so would her father.

There are also instances where, after marrying, she would mention such a case to her husband. After several years, she may remark that she reached puberty before the age of 15, though she did not fast her first or second months of Ramadan. This is all an immense shortcoming in female education and the exaltation of the Sacred Law within our hearts. We should therefore be attentive to this and likewise bring it our girls’ attention. It would be more appropriate for the mother to do so, as she would better relate to girls.

If the girl has her menstrual period beginning at age nine, which now occurs more frequently due to certain foods and viewing certain scenes, the mother should approach and speak with her, introducing to her the issues relating to menstruation, such as:

i) what becomes obligatory
ii) the requirement of the purificatory bath
iii) her reaching puberty
iv) the obligation of fasting once her menstrual period ends
v) teacher her how to perform a proper, valid purificatory bath with a proper, valid intention

These are all important obligations. May Allah enable us to perform them.

Translated by Mahmoud Hamed

Habib Umar bin Hafiz  is a descendant of the Prophet (upon him be Allah’s peace and blessings). Born into a family of scholars, Habib Umar, pursued the sacred sciences from a young age, including Quran, Hadith, Fiqh, ‘Aqeedah, Arabic, and Spirituality. In 1994, he established Dar al-Mustafa, an educational institute in Tarim, Yemem.

Link to the original answer

Is a Ghusl Necessary When My Menstruation Begins Immediately Following Intercourse?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

If a woman discovers her menstrual cycle has begun immediately following intercourse, is ghusl still necessary?

To clarify: the period had not visibly begun prior to engaging in intercourse.

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

No, a ritual bath (ghusl) isn’t necessary right away in the case that a lady’s menstrual cycle begins immediately after intercourse. The ritual bath is still necessary, but it may be fulfilled by bathing at the end of the menstrual period. Obviously, if she wants to bathe before then for cleanliness or the like, this is fine, but she’d need to bathe again at the end of her menstruation.

Please also see: The Ritual Bath (ghusl): Obligatory, Recommended, and Disliked Acts

And Allah Most High knows best.

[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.

How to Fulfill an Oath at the Time of Menstruation?

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I have taken an oath to perform two cycles of nafl prayer in a day if I performed a certain task. I performed that task but my period started just after that. What’s the ruling on it? Can I perform two nafl prayers when my periods will be over?

Answer: Wa ‘alaylkum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

I pray you are well. Thank you for your question.

You can simply pray 2 units when your period ends and your oath will be fulfilled.

The oath you swore is called a nadhr in the Shariʿa: an oath to perform a certain act of worship if a particular thing happens. In oaths such as these, when fulfilling them, it is only important that the act of worship be present. Stipulated times, places, cash and specific poor people are overlooked.

So if someone swore to fast all of Dhul-Qaʿda, but ends of fasting all of Muharram instead the oath is considered fulfilled. The same applies to praying 2 units on a Friday, but praying them on Sunday instead, or giving a particular £10 note to a specific poor person, but doing a bank transfer of that amount to someone else.
(Shurunbulali, Nur al-Idah).

May Allah bless you with the best of both worlds.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 to study and sit at the feet of some of the most erudite scholars of our time.

Over the following eighteen months he studied a traditional curriculum, studying with scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish.

In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years, in Fiqh, Usul al-Fiqh, Theology, Hadith Methodology and Commentary, Shama’il, and Logic with teachers such as Dr Ashraf Muneeb, Dr Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr Mansur Abu Zina amongst others. He was also given two licences of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabr and Shaykh Yahya Qandil.

His true passion, however, arose in the presence of Shaykh Ali Hani, considered by many to be one of the foremost tafsir scholars of our time who provided him with the keys to the vast knowledge of the Quran. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic Sciences, Tafsir, Arabic Grammar, and Rhetoric.

When he finally left Jordan for the UK in 2014, Shaykh Ali gave him his distinct blessing and still recommends students in the UK to seek out Shaykh Abdul-Rahim for Quranic studies. Since his return he has trained as a therapist and has helped a number of people overcome emotional and psychosomatic issues. He is a keen promoter of emotional and mental health.

Can I Eat During the Day While Having My Menses in Ramadan?

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Some scholars say that it is permissible for a woman to eat and drink if she gets menses during fasting but some scholars say that if a woman gets menses while fasting she should not eat and drink until the fast opens. Could you clarify?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

I pray you are well. Thank you for you question.

There are two rulings regarding eating and menstruation:

1. If a lady starts a day fasting and then her menstrual cycle starts before sunset, she should eat, as this means that the fast of the day does not count. She does not need to imitate those who are fasting, because the ruling of fasting does not apply to a lady who is menstruating or someone has post-natal bleeding. She should eat discreetly though, and not publicly.

2. If a lady’s menstrual cycle ends in Ramadan before sunset, she cannot eat until sunset. This is because when the cycle ended she entered into a state in which the rulings of fasting applies to her, but she cannot fast that day, so out of the reverence due to the month she cannot eat until sunset. The same ruling applies to someone who was not fasting because he was travelling; if he reaches home before sunset, he cannot eat until sunset for the same reason.

(Shurunbulali, Maraqi al-Falah).

I hope that clarifies matters for you.

May Allah grant you the best of both worlds.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 to study and sit at the feet of some of the most erudite scholars of our time.

Over the following eighteen months he studied a traditional curriculum, studying with scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish.

In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years, in Fiqh, Usul al-Fiqh, Theology, Hadith Methodology and Commentary, Shama’il, and Logic with teachers such as Dr Ashraf Muneeb, Dr Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr Mansur Abu Zina amongst others. He was also given two licences of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabr and Shaykh Yahya Qandil.

His true passion, however, arose in the presence of Shaykh Ali Hani, considered by many to be one of the foremost tafsir scholars of our time who provided him with the keys to the vast knowledge of the Quran. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic Sciences, Tafsir, Arabic Grammar, and Rhetoric.

When he finally left Jordan for the UK in 2014, Shaykh Ali gave him his distinct blessing and still recommends students in the UK to seek out Shaykh Abdul-Rahim for Quranic studies. Since his return he has trained as a therapist and has helped a number of people overcome emotional and psychosomatic issues. He is a keen promoter of emotional and mental health.