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Muslim Imperatives (Poem) – By Novid Shaid

Muslim Imperatives

Smile endearingly like Al Mustafa

Brighter than an iridescent star

Rise celestially like Isa

Transcending corporeal fever

Conjure mystic snakes like Musa

Which devour the pull of Lucifer

Teach insightful lessons like Al Khidr

Slay the evil imp lurking within

Endure your quandaries like Ibrahim

Scorched by worldly fires but still serene

Supplicate with tears like Maryam

Ask for blessings of miraculous sums

Love your companions like Adam

Appreciate your sir or your madam

Show true patience like Asiya

With pharaonic souls and behaviour

Search for holy water like Hajar

Traverse the mounts of genuine manners

Rest like the seven sleepers of the cave

Hibernate from tendencies depraved

Convey your trusts faithfully like Jibril

Honour your receiver and reveal

Stand for truth like Abu Bakr As Siddiq

Stern with the arrogant; kind with the weak

Rule dependants like Umar ibn Al Khattab

Mediate fairly avoiding harm

Read Quran like Uthman Ibn Affan

Whether in safety or in enemy hands

Strive against deception like Imam Ali

Rip off the gates of inner hypocrisy

Believe sincerely like Khadija

Stay with the truth when most waver

Learn by heart like Lady Aisha

Capture wisdom like an early riser

Abstain from vanity like Fatima

Be in the world like a traveller

Worship the Only One like Al Hasan

Before light appears on the horizon

Campaign and move onwards like Al Husain

Before the tyrants struggle unafraid

Safeguard texts and secrets like dear Hafsa,

As the Quran was entrusted to her

Unify like Bilal Al Habashi

Crush your sins under boulders of unity

Travel like Salman Al Farisi

Gaining untold wisdom endlessly

Persevere and strive like Sumayya

Sacrifice your soul for divine favour

Nurture nature like Abu Hurayra

Be the cats and animals’ saviour

Serve leaders like Anas Bin Malik

Make your service glisten like magic

Love the poor like Uwais Al Qarani

Share your blessings even in poverty

Lead the masses like Umar ibn Abdul Aziz

Treat the rich and poor impartially

Purge your thick self, like Abu Hanifa,

Understand the rulings of the ether

Cherish Medina like Imam Malik

Dismount your horse and feel his dynamic

Efface your self, like Imam Ash Shafi

Even in genius show humility

Cling unflinchingly, like Ahmed Ibn Hanbal

To your creed and your principles

See your faults like Imam Jafar As Saddiq

Let not your lineage make you lethargic

Flee from worldlings like Mulay Idris

Whether in the west or in the east

Reject, like Imam Hasan Al Basri,

The vain glories of this world and history

Eulogise like Rabia Al Adawiyya

Reject the idols that people revere

Recite janaza prayers like Al Bistami

Upon the world’s commotions and tsunamis

Roam for God, like Dhun Nun Al Misri

Searching unceasingly for divine mysteries

Relinquish, like Ibrahim Ibn Adham,

Your earthly throne and mass media bedlam

Walk on earth like Bishr Al Hafi

Waken your sleeping soul like caffeine

Watch your soul like Zubda and Mughda

Make love and service your inner dogma

Join the schools like Imam Al Junayd

See the names and essences unveil

Hide your worship, like Bahlul Majnun

Don’t fret if people think you are a fool

Deny your selfish self, like Lubaba,

Resist the urge to swagger and blabber

Love the next world like Mu’mina

Transcend the aim for fame and villas

Burn your ships like Tariq Bin Ziyad

Face your inner fears, making a stand

Experiment with life, like Imam Al Razi

Test the chemicals of life’s safari

Aim for excellence like Fakhru Din Al Razi

Purify your faith from heresies

Contemplate deeply, like Ibn Rushd,

The signs and symbols of Godhood

Study humankind like Ibn Khaldun

Learn from Bedouins and urban fools

Journey through the earth like Ibn Battuta

See with your own eyes, not with computers

Rise with merit like Lubna of Cordoba

From slavery to exquisite culture

Humble your intellect like Imam Ghazali

Discipline your soul before life’s finale

Conquer the deserts like Hazrat Jilani

Prevail over the world’s spell, uncanny

Accompany sages like Ibn Al Arabi

Absorb their state and spirits’ clarity

Proselytise like Muhyidin Chisti

Dispel misconceptions, dim and misty

Love your friends like Rumi and Shams Tabriz

Let true friendship cure this life’s malaise

Persist and resist like Ertugul Ghazi

Never bowing before the enemy

Conquer your psyche like Al Faatih

Make these victories in constanti

Sail the seas like Imam Ash Shadhili

Against the winds of hidden idolatry

Pray with your secret like Naqshabandi

Gaze into your heart’s profundity

Forgive and be gracious like Salahudin

Those close to you or even your enemies

Share your riches like Mansa Musa

Be generous whilst in your cruiser

Facilitate like Fatima Fehri

Fund the arts, learning and poetry

Flourish superbly like Fakhr Un Nisa

Flow and curl like a master calligrapher

Dress yourself like Imam An Nawawi

Just one suit of utter simplicity

Rouse your ruh like Jani Begum

Ride your elephant; fight for the heavens

Project-manage like Mihrimah Sultan

Build structures steeped in excellence and charm

Compose couplets like Imam Busayri

Praising the chosen one visionary

Send prayers and peace like Imam Al Jazuli

Make salawat your soul and duty

Purify intentions like Imam Haddad

Relish intention’s sky like a nomad

Design structures like Mimar Sinan

Instil a sense of awe across the lands

Direct your sultanate like Uthman Dan Fodio

Make law and spirit your guiding glow

Silence your self like Ma Laichi

Like Khufiyya release your inner chi

See Rasul Allah like Ahmed Tijani

Wade through his tremendous valley

Invoke peace like Al Arabi Ad Darqawi

With all the jealous ones and their armies

Say Allah like Shaykh Ahmed Al Alawi

Until you see the Only Reality

Fight invaders like Tipu Sultan

Make your enemies shiver with alarm

Battle imperialists like Imam Shamil

Purge the empire of your cruel will

Protect the vulnerable like Al Jazairi

Those of faith or other minorities

Tame your lion like Ahmadu Bamba

Just for the truth invoke your anger

Leave this world like Omar Al Mukhtar

Facing death like a warrior

Study Al Quran like Marmaduke Pickthall

Let the verses settle and enthral

Know your degrees like Al Shabrawi

Rise through the seven souls sincerely

Disappear through the One and Only One

Say His name, until your self has gone.


 

The Crucial Status of Fatwa in Islam and Its Impact – Habib Umar

Habib Umar bin Hafez recently addressed the Jordanian General Ifta’ Department on the status of fatwas in Islam and the grave responsibility of the scholars who issue them.

 

The Weight of Giving Religious Verdicts

The Habib began by reminding everyone of the tremendous role that the mufti plays in that he is standing before Allah and His slaves; he conveys to them what they need to do, and how they should view Allah and His commands; their reverence and fear and general attitude is dependent upon his; and their confusion, mistrust, carelessness, and disobedience ultimately comes back to the the mufti not taking his task seriously and not revering the religion as it deserves to be revered.

Extreme Precaution Regarding Accuracy

In light of this, the Habib mentioned various well-known accounts of the precaution taken by the early Muslims when giving fatwa, such as actually shaking while giving the answer for fear and awe, such as wishing that others would answer the question first, and passing the onus of answering until it came back to the same original mufti. And he reminded the attendees of the principle that the fastest person to answer a question is the fastest to enter the Hell-Fire.

Modern Abuses of Religious Verdicts

He then went on to mention the harm modern abuses of fatwa are having on the Muslim world. He mentioned that at the end of the day, extremist tendencies can only come from fatawa: there is a lot of hype and zeal, but people only practice extremist activity when fueled by some kind of knowledge-based authority. This is also the case with super-lenient or down-right incredulous fatwas that make a laughingstock of Allah’s religion.

Mutual Tolerance

The Habib emphasized the  fact that when different scholars do not tolerate one another, and when fatwas are used for political or other agendas, the masses see Islam as source of conflict and animosity, and not solution to their problems. These leads all too naturally to doubt about the very fundamentals of the religion and a serious look at atheism as a realistic alternative.

What the Youth Need

Returning to the role that the attitude and conduct of Muslim scholars has on the average Muslim, the Habib stressed the need for the youth to have something to look up to. He said that they don’t feel like the scholars are really concerned and worried about the the religion, so they either turn away from it, or turn to more military and political forms of Islam, that are not rooted in solid traditional scholarship.

Orthodoxy

The Four Madhhabs, the Habib mentioned, were the bastions of Islamic Law, their rules, and deeper, far-reaching principles being the way that Allah has preserved Sunni Islam. Although they are not the exclusive representations of Sunni praxis, no other traditions have been granted such time- and divinely-honored reception and development. Their sophistication is such that all modern issues, however seemingly complex they may be, and can be solved by returning to their legal principles and maxims.

From Spiritual to Societal Change

The current weakness of Islam, and the general lack of religiously, rests very much the shoulders of Muslim scholars. The Habib repeated the point that if scholars showed more concern, sincerity, and seriousness, Allah would return the religion to its strength. He quoted the words of the Qur’an, “And We made them leaders guidance by Our command because they showed fortitude,” (Sura al-Sajda 32: 24), reiterating the great responsibility that rests upon them that must be taken with all due seriousness.

Keeping Silent

Part of this seriousness is knowing what to say, when, and how. Not everything should be spoken about before everyone. The Habib gave the example of Umar ibn al-Khattab delaying certain discussions raised among the masses while he was on Hajj, to deal with them clearly in a controlled way back in Medina. There are no hidden secrets in Islam, but at the same time, not everyone can contextualize everything that they hear or read. This requires that the mufti gives his questioner what they need to know, and not what they do not need to know.

Taking One’s Time

In fulfilling his duty as a spokesman for Allah, the mufti must also be very careful that he is indeed giving the right answer. (Haste, as mentioned before, is not the way with matters of halal and haram.) Imam Abu Hanifa once said that were it not for fear of the religion being lost, he wouldn’t have answered a single question. Imam Malik was famous for frequently saying that he didn’t know the answer to a particular question, as were Sufyan ibn Uyayna and Imam Ahmad, despite the fact that they knew the answer very well. This was all out of fear of making mistakes, or saying the wrong thing at the wrong time.

The Habib also mentioned that Umar ibn al-Khattab used to be very careful to seek the advice and insight of others, and not just say whatever he first thought of. Having fatwa councils discuss tricky issues in depth is one way this can be done. Another is to rely on authorities and living experts who truly understand the Sacred Law.

Exercising Freedom of Speech

The addresses being in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan — a country that enjoys moderate leadership and freedom of religion — the Habib encouraged the muftis to work with might and main to teach the religion as it is, by way of thanking Allah for the blessing of freedom of speech, a blessing that many other Muslim countries do not enjoy, and many of his own teachers did not enjoy. Sincerity and effort is what they needed, and this is what is required to bring about a change.

 

 


This article is a summary of a talk given by Habib Umar bin Hafez on 16 January 2019/ 10 Jumada al-Ula 1440, in the Jordanian General Ifta’ Department. The notes were written by Ustadh Farid Dingle.


 

When You Can’t See the Vision, Trust the Visionary

Imam Siraj Wahhaj share his thoughts on the importance of supporting SeekersHub and the SeekersHub Islamic Scholars Fund.

Assalaam alaykum, brothers and sisters.

I have become a lover of the SeekersHub. I mean I fell in love with Shaykh Faraz. I’ve always loved the Shaykh, Alhamdulillah. You know what you remind me of? I think of you and I think of something that the Prophet, upon him be blessings and peace, did with his wife Aisha. He said one day, “Ya Aisha… Oh Aisha, here is Jibril, and he’s given you the salams. He’s saying to you: ‘Assalam alaykum.’” She said, “Peace and blessings be upon him and the mercy of Allah. You see, what I don’t see.”

“You see what I don’t see.” And sometimes when you can’t see the vision then trust the visionary. The insight and the wisdom of what has been done with you and others is astounding. It is so great I’m embarrassed that more people don’t know about it and I’m embarrassed that more people don’t help it.

So I’m going to spend a couple of minutes in trying to show our support for this fine institution. I want to tell you something. You know Allah blessed me and every time I say this, Shaykh, I get this big response. I’m going to tell you how many children I have.
Allah blessed me with nine children. I told you.

Instilling Sadaqa

And the one thing I will tell you that I’ve always done. I’ve always given my children allowance. How many of you give your children allowance? Raise your hand. How many don’t? Mashallah, mashallah. But I always believed in giving my children allowance. I gave them allowance every week but I would always tell them that whatever allowance I give you you should give some to sadaqa.

And you know when you have children whenever you give them a commandment, you should look at their faces, shaykh. So one of my children, Muhammed, may Allah bless him, he looked like he had an attitude when I said give some money. The allowance, give it to sadaqa. And I said, “Muhammed, what’s the matter?” He said nothing. I knew better. I know my son. I said, “Muhammed what’s the matter?” “Nothing.” I said, “Come on man, I know you. What’s the matter?”

He said, “Dad, how come I got to give some money to Sadaka?” Sadaka is a name of his older sister. True story. And he thought he had to give money to Sadaka. You know you will learn today, none of you ever knew my kunya. You know what my kunya is? Abu Sadaka. Sadaka is my first child. So I am Abu Sadaka. So today I want you to give to Sadaka, she lives in New York. No.

Food for Thought

I just want you to think about this, right? I’m going to ask you for your financial support and the beautiful thing about this; what we’re asking you for tonight ain’t much. When you study the Qur’an you will see that often in the Qur’an Allah is speaking to the Prophet, peace be upon him. It is almost as if we’re like on the outside listening to this conversation that Allah is having with the Prophet, peace and blessing be upon him.

Example, you said the word “qalat.” He said “qalat” (she said). But if he said the word “qul” what does that mean? “Say…” It’s a command. But the Arabic language is very precise. So when you say “qul” you’re not talking about two people. You’re not talking about a bunch of people. You’re not talking about women. You’re talking about one person and that’s Muhammed, peace be upon him. I counted over 360 something times in the Qur’an where Allah says to Muhammed, peace be upon him, “qul,” say this.

I’m going to show you another, part of another verse where Allah is speaking to the Prophet, peace be upon him. Listen to how Allah says it. “They ask you, oh Muhammed, ‘How much should we spend?’” Allah is telling the Prophet that the people asking you, “What should we spend?” “Qul.” “Say, what is extra.” (Sura al-Baqara 2:219) Why is that important?

In my community, in other communities, we have people literally who work two and three jobs just to make ends meet. They work two and three jobs just to have a place to live in. They work two and three jobs to put food on the plates of their family. Others Allah blessed with more. They have what is called disposable income meaning that after they pay all of their expenses, they pay for their rent, they pay for everything, and yet they still got money left.

Compete in Charity

Let me tell you something about the Sahaba, may Allah be pleased with them. They, you know, they’re so pure. In this hadith some of the poor of the companions of the Prophet, peace be upon him came to him, and I don”t want to use the word complain, so I put it in quotation marks. They complained to the Prophet, peace be upon him. The rich ones, the wealthy are among us. They take away the reward. They pray like we pray. They fast like we fast. But they spend out of the excess of their wealth. We can’t be like them. We can’t compete with them. We want more. We want to compete.

I don’t want more money so I can build a better house. I don’t want money so I can get some jewellery. I want more money so that I can give in sadaqa. So today I’m not asking you to spend your rent money. I’m not asking you to spend your food money. I’m asking you to look if you have anything excessive and to spend that.

I want to give you one person and then I’m going to ask for your money. There’s a woman, I think her name is Laurene. I’ll think of her name in a moment. But this is the 25th wealthiest woman in America. 25th wealthiest woman in America. And she’s the 25th wealthiest person, not woman, person in America and the 45th wealthiest person in the world. And you know how much money she’s worth? 19 billion, 500 million dollars. And to put that in perspective she has more wealth than 80 nations you know gross domestic product. That’s how wealthy she is.

What Is Truly Yours

Lot of money, okay. I didn’t tell you her, that was her maiden name. I just wish I could remember her last name, her maiden name. Laurene, yeah. Where did she get her money from? Where she get that 19 billion dollars from? Where she get it from? I’ll give you a hint. I’ll give you her last name, her married name, Jobs. Where’d she get it from? Steve Jobs. How she get it. That money belonged to him. He died, she inherited it. That’s the way it is.

The reality is everything that you have you don’t use it’ll be inherited. This is why the prophet, peace and blessing be upon him, said the people said, “My wealth, my wealth.” Really, for real? He said, what is really yours is what you eat and consume, what you wear and wear out and what you send ahead in sadaqa, that’s yours.

How do you know? Steve Jobs, his wealth, 19.5 billion dollars belonged to him until he died and it no longer belonged to him. Think about this. The car that you drive one day won’t be your car. All your beautiful clothing, your shoes. Shaykh, am I allowed to ask the sisters a question? Laurene Powell, mercy, I knew the Shaykh would get it. Shaykh, can I ask the sisters a question? Brothers, can I ask the sisters a question? Your permission, Shaykh, can I ask the sisters? [Shaykh Faraz:] “By all means.”

How Many Pairs of Shoes…

By all means. Now sisters you got to be honest with you, right. How many of you own more than two pairs of shoes? Raise your hand. Mashallah, Allahu Akbar. You should see what I see. How many of you have more than five pairs of shoes? Raise your hand. Allahu Akbar, all right.

I’m almost finished. How many of you own more than 10 pairs of shoes? Come on, Mashallah, Allahu Akbar. How many of you have more than 20 pairs of shoes? Come on, Allahu Akbar. The average American woman, okay good, okay.

Oh, ask the brothers. I should ask the brothers. [Women:] “Yes.” I don’t want to ask the brothers. They ain’t got no shoes. They got one or two pairs of shoes (laughter) Let me tell you though, right. The average American woman has 20 pairs of shoes. Average American woman, average, has 20 pairs of shoes.

What’s my point? The point is that there’s going to come a time. Every soul is going to taste of death. What about what we have left? This excess wealth that we have, what are we going to do with it? Why not spend some of it and get some ajar (reward) for SeekersHub?


Share and Support SeekersHub Global

Share Imam Siraj Wahhaj’s passion for SeekersHub Global and help us build a support system for Muslim scholars to attend to their most important duty. Hear what Imam Siraj says about the vision, insight, and wisdom of what has been done by SeekersHub and the SeekersHub Islamic Scholars Fund, which is at the of its mission.

Share with us our concern for Muslim scholars and allowing them to carry on their mission to spread the prophetic light of guidance and knowledge; despite all the economic burdens that they shoulder.

Give now! Whether it is your zakat or sadaqa, it’s not too late to give your end-of-year charitable donations to a worthy cause, one that pleases Allah and supports the heirs of His prophets in our time.