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Is It Permissible to Name My Baby Dhul-Qarnayn?

Answered by Ustadha Shazia Ahmad

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Is it permissible to name my baby Dhul-Qarnayn?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum, sister,

Historians and Quranic exegetes (mufassirun) mention that Dhul-Qarnayn was a pious king that ruled ancient Yemen around the year 1330 B.C. He conquered lands and ruled much of the East and the West.

His good deeds are mentioned in the Qur`an when he erected a barrier between a people and the evil Ya’juj and Ma’juj. [Qur`an, 18:93-98]. Dhul-Qarnayn is a nickname which lexically means “the owner of the two horns” or “the owner of the two centuries”.

It is permissible to name one’s child Dhul-Qarnayn. It also would be fine to nickname your son Qarnayn.

May Allah give you an easy pregnancy, delivery and make him the coolness of your eyes.

Wassalam,
[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterwards, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Naming a Child Eesa Ibrahim Khan.

Answered by Ustadh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

Me and my wife have just had a baby boy, we were thinking about names and we wanted to name our child Eesa Ibrahim Khan. I just wanted to check if we can 2 prophets names together or if it was best just to go with Eesa Khan?

Answer: assalamu alaykum

There is no problem in joining the names of two prophets in the manner you have described.

[Ustadh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Salman Younas  graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman where he spent five years studying Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Oxford and continues his traditional studies with scholars in the United Kingdom.

Can I Name My Baby Girl Inara Mayameen or Inara Al Mayameen?

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Can I name my baby girl Inara Mayameen or Inara Al Mayameen?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

It is recommended to name one’s children beautiful names, and particularly recommended to name them after righteous predecessors such as the Prophetic Companions or others. Names like Maryam, Asiya are names of righteous women in the Quran; names like Zaynab, Asma, Fatima, Umm Kulthum are names of female Prophetic Companions. Any other beautiful name in any language, as long as it isn’t too religiously pretentious, will also do.

As far as I know, inara means lighting, as in lighting up a house, and mayameen means blessed ones. It would kind of mean that your daughter is the enlightenment of those who are blessed, but it would sound a little awkward in Arabic. Maybe a name like Muneera (she who gives light) or Maymoona (she who is good/blessed, and also one on the Prophet’s wives (Allah bless him and grant him peace)) might be more simple.

And Allah knows best.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed.

Is It Wrong to Name My Baby Miraj in Islam?

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Is it wrong to name my baby Miraj in Islam?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

Thank you for your question.

There is nothing wrong with naming a child Miraj as it is not inherently impermissible, nor does it have a negative meaning. The Messenger of Allah said, ‘Indeed you will called by your names and the names of your fathers on the Day of Judgement, so [choose] good names’ (Abu Dawud).

And Allah knows best.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 to study and sit at the feet of some of the most erudite scholars of our time.

Over the following eighteen months he studied a traditional curriculum, studying with scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish.

In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years, in Fiqh, Usul al-Fiqh, Theology, Hadith Methodology and Commentary, Shama’il, and Logic with teachers such as Dr Ashraf Muneeb, Dr Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr Mansur Abu Zina amongst others. He was also given two licences of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabr and Shaykh Yahya Qandil.

His true passion, however, arose in the presence of Shaykh Ali Hani, considered by many to be one of the foremost tafsir scholars of our time who provided him with the keys to the vast knowledge of the Quran. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic Sciences, Tafsir, Arabic Grammar, and Rhetoric.

When he finally left Jordan for the UK in 2014, Shaykh Ali gave him his distinct blessing and still recommends students in the UK to seek out Shaykh Abdul-Rahim for Quranic studies. Since his return he has trained as a therapist and has helped a number of people overcome emotional and psychosomatic issues. He is a keen promoter of emotional and mental health.

Can I Change the Name of My Child After His Birth?

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

I was used to call my son Abdul Hadi before his birth. But after his birth I want to name him Abdul Ahad.

Can I call him Abdul Ahad?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

Depending on the circumstance, the changing of a name could either be impermissible, reprehensible, permissible, encouraged or compulsory. [Bujayrami]

Impermissible:
It’s haram to change a permissible name to an impermissible one, such as changing the name AbduLlah (slave of Allah) to AbdulMasih (slave of the Messiah)

Reprehensible (makruh)
It’s disliked to change a good name for a disliked one, such as changing the name Sa’id for Rabbah.

Permissible:
Changing one permissible name for another is permitted in Islam, such as in your case. You may change the name AbdulHadi to AbdulAhad.

Desired or encouraged:
When the name consists of self-praise, such as in the hadith transmitted by Abu Hurayrah that the name of Zaynab was barrah (pious) and people began speaking that she’s praising herself. The Messenger sallaLlahu alayhi wasallam then changed her name to Zaynab. [Agreed upon]

Compulsory:
Changing an impermissible name to a permissible one is compulsory, such as changing the name AbdulMasih to AbduLlah.

As stated above, it would thus be permissible for you to change your son’s name.

And Allah knows best.

Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

What Should Be the Family Name of a Child After a Rape? (Shafi’i)

Answered by Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Question: Assalam alaykum,

1) If a women were to be raped and decided to keep the child, what would be the ruling on naming the child?

2) if a non-Muslim man who did not know the identity of his father,converts to Islam, and marries a Muslim woman, how will he and his children be named?

Answer: Wa alaykum al-Salam

May Allah bless you.

I am assuming that you are referring to the surname or family name of the child, rather than the first name. Consequently, the vast majority of scholars held that no lineage is established between a child born out of wedlock and the biological father. Accordingly, the child’s lineage runs through his mother and he will thus carry her surname, irrespective whether the rapist is known or not.

With regards to the revert to Islam, his lineage between him and his family will not be severed. He – and his offspring thereafter – will continue to hold the same family name.

And Allah knows best
Wassalam
[Shaykh] Abdurragmaan Khan

Shaykh Abdurragmaan
received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Is It Permissible to Name My Baby After an Angel?

Answered by Ustadh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

Is it permissible to name my baby after an angel? (i.e. Jibreel).

Answer: assalamu alaykum

Yes, it is permitted to name your child after an angel. For more see:

Is it Permissible to Name Children with Names of Angels?

[Ustadh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Salman Younas graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman. There he studies Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir.

Are Hyphenated Surnames Permissible?

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

My husband and I are expecting our first child. I have retained my fathers name since marriage and have no intention to change it. Does Islam allows for hyphenated last names (e.g. Ali-Yusuf), in a case where the mother’s last name is Ali and the Father’s is Yusuf?

Answer:Wa’alaykum assalam. Thank you for your question. Congratulations on expecting your first child. May Allah grant you ease and comfort during these early stages, and make your child a source of mercy and blessing for you both in this life and the next.

There is a difference in opinion in regards using a different surname other than one’s father’s surname. We shall mention these opinions first, before discussing the use of hyphenated surnames.

Changing Surnames

In the Shafi’i school, the general ruling on a wife adopting the husbands name, or a child adopting the mother’s name (as opposed to the father’s name) is not permitted. This is what all our teachers, in Yemen and Jordan, have stated.

This is based on the hadith, ‘You will all be called on the day of judgement by your names and your fathers names, so therefore keep good names for your selves’ [Abu Dawud, Musnad Ahmad], and, ‘Whoever ascribes himself to other than his father, knowing that he is not his father, then Paradise will be denied to him.’ [al Bukhari, Muslim]

However, in the Hanafi school, changing surnames in the above scenarios is permissible, as long as one is not negating their lineage. For a summary of the Hanafi position, one may read this answer, while for a detailed answer, one may read this answer.

Hyphenated Surnames

In regards the permissibility of hyphenated surnames, it appears that it would be permissible, since the father’s surname is still preserved. However, because it may be construed by others as one surname (or morph into one name at a later point), for clarity and precaution, you may want to use the names without hyphenation, so that the mother’s surname functions as a middle name, and the father’s surname as the distinct family name.

Difficulties in Mother keeping her family surname

Generally speaking, most people are free to choose whatever name they choose in Western countries, so a woman retaining her own family surname does not usually pose difficulties, even when travelling. However, as mentioned, the Hanafi position on this matter does exist, if one feels the need to utilise it.

And Allah knows best.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Should I Clear All My Doubts Before Converting to Islam? Should I Change My Name and Cut My Hair?

Answered by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Question: I am considering converting to Islam and have several questions.

Should I change my name due to it having un-Islamic meanings? It means ‘Christ-bearer’.

My hair is long, it is past my shoulders but is neat and kept clean. Am I commanded to cut it if I convert?

I still am researching and trying to clear doubts, should I take my Shahadah now or wait and clear my doubts first and say it with a clear mind?

Answer:  In the Name of Allah, the Merciful and Compassionate

Assalamu alaikum,

I hope you’re doing well, insha’Allah.

You appear to already be a Muslim, as a Muslim is anyone who believes in God, and accepts the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) as being a true Prophet of God. The outward act of converting—through uttering the testification of faith—is simply in order for others to know you to be Muslim.

The questions you ask are details of religious practice, and are not matters that should hold you back from embracing the faith.

Moreso, they are straightforward matters:

One. You don’t need to change your name. When people entered Islam—Arab or non-Arab—the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) did not order them to change their names, unless their names had clearly negative meanings.

Neither your first name nor last name has a negative meaning. As Muslims, we love and believe in Jesus Christ (peace be upon him) as a great Prophet of God.

Two. There is nothing wrong with long hair: The Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) himself often wore his hair to his shoulder blades, or even slightly beyond. [Tirmidhi, Shama’il]

[Shaykh] Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Faraz Rabbani is a scholar and researcher of Islamic law and Executive Director of SeekersHub Global After ten years overseas, Shaykh Faraz returned to Canada in the Summer of 2007. In May 2008 he founded SeekersHub Global to deal with the urgent need to spread Islamic knowledge—both online and on the ground—in a reliable, relevant, inspiring, and accessible manner. He has been repeatedly listed as one of the world’s 500 most influential Muslims (The Muslim500).

Is It Permissible to Name Your Child After a Living Person?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

Is it permissible to name your child after a living person?

In the Syrian tradition the first born son of the oldest son is named after the paternal grandfather.

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

I haven’t come across a ruling which indicates the dislikedness of naming a child after a living person. Rather, the matter of naming is very expansive, as long as you adhere to some general guidelines which are outlined in the attached answers.

Please also see: Is it Necessary to Change One’s Name after Becoming Muslim? and: Can We Give to Our Baby His Grandfather’s Name as a Surname?

And Allah Most High alone knows best.

[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.