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Farewell Ode to Ramadan – Hafith Abdullah Francis

* Originally Published on 3/07/2016

Hafith Abdullah recites odes of farewell to Ramadan after the Tarawih prayers, in the Cape Malay tradition. He concludes with supplications asking for God’s mercy, forgiveness and His emancipation from the hellfire.

Nasheed Hub: Bi Haqqila

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Bi Haqqila Rijal Allah

The tradition of tawassul, or seeking Allah’s favours through the high rank of Prophets or the righteous, is a confirmed practice which has been done through the centuries of Islamic history. This nasheed asks for the support of the “Rijal Allah,” or the People of Allah, the righteous ones, such as the leaders and spiritual masters.

Click on the image below to scroll. 

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Nasheed Hub: Ataynak Bil Faqr

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Ataynak Bil Faqr (We Have Come to You In Need)

Ataynak Bil Faqr is a classic nasheed that sung all over the Muslim world. It comes in the form of an intimate expression of need, and a comforting recognition that Allah is in control of everything.

The poem starts off by the author describing himself in a state of despair and poverty. In contrast, he knows that Allah is completely free of need, and is the Most Merciful and Generous.

We have come to you, enwrapped in poverty, O You who is always without need. And You are the one who has always been excellent in showing kindness.

He continues by describing his deep love for Allah, and that his wish to reach Allah overriding everything else in his life. He knows that “there is no one in richness like You, and in poverty there is no group like us.” He is determined to put all his trust in Allah, knowing that He has Divine control, while nobody else has power to change things. “If You’re with me in every state, than I have no need of carrying my provision. Because You are the Truly Real, so if only I could realise who I am!”

Click on the image below to scroll.

[pdf-embedder url=”http://seekershub.org/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/أتيناك-بالفقر-converted.pdf” title=”أتيناك بالفقر-converted”]

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.nahnu fi rawda
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


With gratitude to the Chicago Mawlid Committee.


Nasheed Hub: SallaAllahu Alayk Ya Nur

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Sallalahu Alayk Ya Nur

This poem sends praise and blessings upon the Prophet, using analogy and comparing him to light. It was written by Shaykh Ahmad al-Alawi, the leader of the Alawi spiritual path. He was born in Mustaghanem, a city in Algeria, and later migrated to Morocco. After many years of study, he returned to his hometown, teaching until his death in 1934.

He begins the poem by saying “May Allah send blessings upon you, O Light! O Light of every station!” By using the analogy of light, something everyone can easily relate to, the author is able to educate the reader about the Prophet’s significance to the religion of Islam, to the life of Muslims, and to his appearance in the world.

He goes on to compare him to “lamp, oil, and light,” that is to say, complete light without a dependency, a light that came tremendously, as a perfect balance. Everything in existence became manifest through him, in the most beautiful manner. He was created before anything else was, and will continue to exist eternally.

He finishes by affirming that the universe is filled with light because of the Prophet’s light, and that he has attained all virtues and praiseworthy traits.

Click on the image below to scroll.

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Nasheed Hub: Ya Talib al-Fana

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Ya Talib al-Fana (O You Who Seeks Annihilation Through Allah)

Ya Talib al-Fana, is the final poem in the series of the works of Shaykh Muhammad ibn al-Habib. It speaks to those who desire Allah fully.

The author begins by addressing the seekers directly, as “O you who seeks annihilation!” He then advises him to constantly be in remembrance of the name of Allah, devotedly and without distraction. If he makes Allah the object of his focus and devotion, all his other worries and concerns will be taken care of.

He then goes on to say that the seeker should make an effort to rid himself of distraction and other thoughts, since it will hinder him learning about Allah’s Divine Unity. The realisation of Allah’s Unity begins with remembrance of Allah and loving Him.

However, traversing the path cannot happen without a guide, and so the author congratulates the one who is able to find a living teacher. He mentions the qualities such a teacher must have: they must have devoted themselves completely to Allah, and made many nights prayers reciting His words.

Finally, the author says that all of our help comes from the Prophet, and sending blessings upon him, his family, and all those who call to him.

Click on the image below to scroll.

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Nasheed Hub: Salamun ‘Ala Ahl al-Hima

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersGuidance Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Salamun ‘Ala Ahl al-Hima (Peace be Upon the People of the Sacred Precinct)

This poem which appears as the final song in the Diwan of Shaykh Muhammad Ibn al-Habib, the famous guide of the Darqawi spiritual path. Some of the poems included in the collection, Nahnu Fi Rawda and Qasida Salamiyya, focus on his love for the Prophet Muhammad, Allah bless him and give him peace.

However, this one, titled “Peace be Upon the People of the Sacred Precinct,” reflects his love for the awliya, or Allah’s elect. It was written by Shaykh Abdul Salaam Jassus, and his nephew would regularly quote his poetry, especially in his final illness before death:

The author refers to the awliya as “those of the Sacred Precinct,” thus giving the analogy of being close to the Divine Presence, just like one would be close to holy places such as the Kaa’ba in Mecca or the Prophet’s Mosque in Medina. He congratulates them for the magnitude of their state, in which Allah has revealed to them about His beauty.

Out of his humility, he asks them to allow him to be among them despite his unworthiness, since they are worthy of bringing even the unworthy with them. He prays to Allah to elevate them even further, and that the blessing of Allah’s presence stay with them for ever.

Click on the image below to scroll. 

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.

Nasheed Hub: Salawat al-Badriyya

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersGuidance Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Salawat al-Badriyya (The Badran Praise)

The tradition of tawassul, or seeking Allah’s favours through the high rank of Prophets or the righteous, is a confirmed practice which has been done through the centuries of Islamic history. This nasheed seeks Allah’s many favours through the people who were present at the Battle of Badr,  one of the most miraculous events of the life of the Prophet Muhammad, Allah bless him and give him peace, and a pivotal moment for the Muslim community.

The poem begins by sending Allah’s peace and blessings on the Muhammad, the Prophet of Allah and the Beloved of Allah. Then, the author first seeks intercession through the blessed words Bismillah, or “in the name of Allah,” and through the Prophet Muhammad, Allah bless him and give him peace. After that, he begins tawassul through the people of Badr.

He asks Allah to protect the Muslim umma from calamities, worries, and trials, through the high spiritual rank of those at Badr. He recounts how many blessings have been granted and how many difficulties have been removed, because of the people of Badr.

He then says that hearts have felt constricted despite the vastness of the earth, and asks Allah to remove this sadness. He says that they have come to Allah, seeking to gain peace and happiness, and asks Allah to put them into a goodly state.

Click on the image below to scroll. 

 

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Nasheed Hub: Qasidah Salamiyya

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersGuidance Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Qasidah Salamiyya (The Poem of Blessings)

This poem is another one written by the famous spiritual sage, Shaykh Muhammad Ibn al-Habib of the Darqawi spiritual path. Like Nahnu Fi Rawda, it carries his deep love for the Prophet Muhammad, Allah bless him and give him peace, and his attachment to the Rawda, his blessed resting place. This poem is in the form of a prayer, where Shaykh Ibn al-Habib sends peace on the Prophet Muhammad, naming everything that he loves about him.

He begins by sending peace in the grave of the Prophet, and the Rawda. He describes his heartfelt connection to the Rawda, and the many virtues that his Beloved has been adorned with, such as being called to Allah’s presence in the night of the Ascension, and having a lizard testify to the truth of his prophethood.

His Beloved is also the one to whom Allah has granted such splendid beauty, and special virtue and majesty. He mentioned the great news to being able to visit the Rawda, and asks people who are going to convey his greetings. Unfortunately, he says that he is not able to visit himself, but the image of the Rawda stays in his mind, the most beautiful image he has ever seen.

Click on the image below to scroll.

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.nasheed hub
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.


Nasheed Hub: Nahnu Fi Rawda

The Nasheed Hub, an initiative of SeekersHub Global, aims to showcase the traditional Islamic art of nasheed, or Islamic devotional songs.

Nahnu fi Rawda (We Are Present In the Rawda)

“Nahnu fi Rawda” is a beautiful poem written by the great sage Shaykh Muhammad Ibn al-Habib, a Moroccan scholar and the guide of the Darqawi spiritual path. The Rawda, literally a meadow or garden, refers to the blessed resting place of the Prophet Muhammad, Allah bless him and give him peace, where the author composed this piece.

After speaking about being in the presence of the Prophet and what he is seeking, the author says that he has come to the Prophet’s grave in a state of brokenness and dejection, seeking the intercession of the Prophet on the Day of Judgement when he is being resurrected and judged.

The Shaykh continues by speaking of the immense rank of the Prophet Muhammad, so high that even all the other Prophets attained what they know only thought the Prophet Muhammad. He compares him to being the door that leads to Allah, and that he is requesting intercession through him.

He then goes on to say that he is confident that his prayers will be answered, because anyone who comes (literally, everyone who throws down his saddle) in the court of a generous person, will be given everything he seeks.

Then, Shaykh Ibn al-Habi says that he has been thanking Allah every moment for this opportunity to visit the Prophet, as well as his Companions who are buried in Jannat al-Baqi, the graveyard in Medina. He is also thankful to have visited the Prophet’s grandchildren, the descendants of Fatima al-Batool (meaning the one totally devoted to Allah’s worship), the martyrs at the battle of Uhud including Hamzah, the uncle of the Prophet, as well as the Prophet’s son Ibrahim, who he refers to as “the son of the rescuer of humanity on the Resurrection.”

He closes by asking for a safe journey back to his homeland of Morocco, and sends prayers and blessings on the Prophet Muhammad and his family and followers.

 

 

About Nasheed Hub

Throughout the decades and civilisations of Islam, the vocal tradition, sometimes known as nasheed or devotional songs, were penned as a way of celebrating and giving thanks to Allah for the message of Islam, as well as for the Messenger himself.
These nasheeds were a way for people to turn towards their Lord in joyful celebration, rather than stringent routine. They were also tools to spread the message of Islam in a non-confrontational way. These nasheeds were able to reach out to those who were alienated or indifferent to the religion and the Muslim community, as well as to teach children who were too young for academic study.nasheed hub
These nasheeds originating from all corners of the Muslim world – from West Africa to Malaysia, from Turkey to Great Britian – mirror their own culture but all carry a common thread: love of Allah and His Messenger.
This series will explore the different nasheeds, penned by some of the great historical Muslim figures, poets, and scholars.

 


Ala Ya Allah Bi Nadhra – Imam Haddad’s Poem at His Wife’s Death

Shaykh Muhammad Ba-Dhib explains Imam Haddad’s famous poem “Ala ya Allah bi Nadhra (ألا يالله بنظرة),” which he composed upon the passing of his wife.

Not only was Imam Haddad a great scholar and Knower of Allah, but he was also a skilled poet and literary author. One of the characteristics of his poetry is a great sense of grief and sadness, and this poem, “Ala ya Allah bi Nadhra,” was composed after his wife’s passing.

He begins by saying,

“O my friend, do not be overburdened with worries.

And submit to God’s decrees so that you can become praiseworthy and rewarded.

And be content with what the Master has decreed, and don’t have any displeasure with the decree of Allah, Lord of the Lofty Throne.”

Although the Imam was experiencing intense pain and grief, he was advising himself and others to not complain or worry too much, so that they can be rewarded and honoured by Allah for having patience.

“And be patient and grateful,

You will become victorious and rewarded (by Allah)

And be from the people of Inward Secrets.

The people of Allah have an illuminated heart that is purified from all dirt, pure, and a purification for others.”

Here he is saying that when one is patient with Allah’s decree, Allah gives one a purified heart. Most people become very distressed or complain when they are tested, but the true believers are patient, having love of Allah and hope for reward from Him.

“And this lowly world, it’s problems are many in every moment, and life within it does not have a value,

And one does not seek this dunya unless their sight is completely blinded. If they had an intellect, they would have been more reflective.

Reflect over the fading of this world.

And on the great difficulties that occur.

And on the low worth of its value.

So blessed, truly blessed, is to the who is careful of it, and who divorced the world and focus themselves towards obedience of their Lord.”

No matter how rich or poor we are, we all need the same things; a little bit of food, something to drink, and clothing and shelter. Whether those are expensive or cheap, our needs are the same, and so is the end result; a grave and a shroud.

We could spend our lives working, but in the end, it will all come to nothing. Therefore, the best person is the one who recognizes this, and uses the world only for his needs, nothing more.

“Oh my eye! Let the tears flow regarding that beloved that used to be with us, 

Who then went on their journey, and my heart and mind after them have become overtaken

But Allah is my Sufficiency,

And the entire affair belongs to Allah,

And no one remains except Allah.”

Here, the Imam is reflecting on the passing of his beloved after years of spending time together and taking care of each other. He consoles himself by reminding himself that he should rely on Allah, and that everything besides Allah will come to an end.

“Upon Bashar have come the clouds of Allah’s mercy, and Allah has given them glad tidings and has blessed them. 

Within it are our Masters, teachers, our family and our loved ones; those who are beloved to my heart are there. 

And those who have taken residence in the deepest depths of my heart.  And in this plain of the graveyard, its dust is more beautiful than musk. 

Because it is the resting place of the best of the Sayyids,

Exemplars for all people,

Loving them is felicity,

Fortunate is the one who visits them with sincerity. By the blessing of visiting them, what they seek from Allah will come.”

Bashar is the name of the graveyard that his wife was buried in. Imam Haddad recalls this fact that gives him comfort; that his wife is surrounded by righteous men and woman who are teachers, family members, and loved ones who are descendants of the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace. He advises everyone to follow the sunna of visiting graves.

Listen to this poem here: