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Is It Permissible for Me To Leave My Home To Learn Traditional Islam Despite My Parents’ Insistence That I Study Under a Salafi?

Question: My parents tell me that I am misguided because I follow a madhab and reject good innovation. They believe that one should see the opinions of the four imams and then follow the ruling given by a scholar who picks the one with the most evidence. They forbid me to seek knowledge anywhere besides Salafi scholars. Can I leave my home against their wishes to learn in traditional Islam? If my parents only allow me to marry a Salafi in the future, can I get married with a different wali, such as a paternal uncle or grandfather?

Answer:

Assalamu alaykum,
Thank you for your question. I empathize with your frustration at not being able to convince your parents of the truth. By the grace of Allah, and with time, they will come around; perhaps the truth will come to them through you and your future spouse or even your children.

Disobeying parents

There is some leeway to taking matters into your own hands when you are prevented from learning obligatory religious knowledge by your parents. Please see the details here:

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/when-may-parents-be-disobeyed-and-how/
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/parents/promise-to-ones-parents/

Tact

Because you are in the rare circumstance where you are right, and your parents are wrong, it would be permissible for you to seek correct and authentic traditional knowledge of Islam, but you would do better to do it without breaking their hearts. Can you take classes online? Can you speak to them with respect and politeness about this topic and ask them to hear you out sometimes, even if they disagree? Can you practice what you know without displaying it outwardly all the time? Can you go out to learn but come back within the limits that they set? Perhaps show them this article:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/who-or-what-is-a-salafi/

Marriage

There would be some details around the subject of your marriage to a man that they might not approve of, but you should not worry about those details now. The bottom line is that there is always a way out for a girl who wants to choose the right spouse for herself when her parents are pushing for the wrong man for her religion. See the details here:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/can-marry-secret-minimum-conditions-valid-marriage-order-avoid-fornication/

May Allah give you the best of this world and the next, and I pray that Allah facilitates these matters for you.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria, for two years, where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, Tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Master’s in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan, where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

What Do I Do If I Have Answered A Fiqh Question Incorrectly?

 

Question:

Assalamu ‘Alaykum.

If I have answered a question wrongly about fiqh in class, would that require me to repent?

Answer:

Wa ‘alaykum assalam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh.

I pray you are well.

You should repent if you were not qualified to answer or if you didn’t know and just guessed without a sound legal basis for your answer. Regardless, you should speak to everyone who heard the answer and tell them that you made a mistake.

As long as you rectify the situation, you won’t be sinful for making a mistake when answering. Don’t be afraid to consult with teachers, and frequently practice saying the words that are considered half of the learning: I don’t know.

If you have not studied fiqh in depth – from the original Arabic sources – you should not be answering questions. If you have, speak to your teacher and ask him if you have reached a level where you can research and answer questions. If he says no, then don’t try to answer them.

Don’t try to rush things. Everything comes at the right time. Answering questions is a responsibility before Allah: learning its weight takes longer than learning the answers to those questions.

Direct the questioners to the SeekersGuidance answers service. It is an excellent resource for thousands of commonly asked questions. Most importantly – encourage people to engage in structured learning. This is the means to them empowering themselves with the knowledge of their din.

May Allah grant you the best of both worlds.
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History, he moved to Damascus in 2007, where, for 18 months, he studied with many erudite scholars. In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years in Sacred Law (fiqh), legal theory (Usul al-fiqh), theology, hadith methodology, hadith commentary, and Logic. He was also given licenses of mastery in the science of Quranic recital; He was able to study an extensive curriculum of Quranic sciences, tafsir, Arabic grammar, and Arabic eloquence.

  What is the scholarly opinion regarding priority of hifz vs learning Classical Arabic?

Question Summary

What is the scholarly opinion regarding the priority of hifz vs. learning Classical Arabic?

Question Answer

In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful and Compassionate

Memorizing the entire Qur’an and learning the Arabic language are both communal obligations. As long as some people in each community fulfill this need, the obligation falls off everyone else; in such a case, memorizing the Qur’an and/or learning Arabic is encouraged but in no way an obligation.

With that being said, you have full discretion to choose which you would prefer to do within the time period at your disposal.

One of our teachers would say that if you must choose between good deeds, then use the following method to decide:

1) If you can do both without causing yourself any undue difficulty, that is ideal
2) If not, give preference to the one you are less likely to do later.
3) Give preference to that which benefits more people over that which merely benefits yourself
4) Give preference to that which is obligatory or mandatory

The Prayer of Seeking Guidance

The Messenger of Allah (may Allah bless him and give him peace) taught us the prayer of seeking guidance (istikhara). This is a gift to this community by which we can consign our decisions to the One who has all-encompassing knowledge, Allah Most High.

See this link for the method of performing this prayer.

Advice

It is personally obligatory on every Muslim to seek knowledge that allows them to fulfill their duties to Allah Most High (i.e., fulfilling all obligations and abstaining from all prohibitions that directly relate to one’s circumstances). Such knowledge should be prioritized over any other knowledge or pursuit, no matter how virtuous the knowledge or pursuit may be. [Birgivi; al-Tariqa al-Muhammadiyya]

Hope this helps
Allah knows best
[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a teacher of Arabic, Islamic law, and spirituality. After accepting Islam in 2008, he then completed four years at the Darul Uloom seminary in New York, where he studied Arabic and the traditional sciences. He then traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he stayed for three years studying in Dar Al-Mustafa under some of the greatest scholars of our time, including Habib Umar Bin Hafiz, Habib Kadhim al-Saqqaf, and Shaykh Umar al-Khatib. In Tarim, Shaykh Yusuf completed the memorization of the Qur’an and studied beliefs, legal methodology, hadith methodology, Quranic exegesis, Islamic history, and some texts on spirituality. He joined the SeekersGuidance faculty in the summer of 2019.

Ten Ways to Benefit for Menstruating Women in Ramadan

Dread your period during the blessed month of Ramadan? Feel like you’re missing out on all the worship? Nour Merza gives women ten practical ways to spiritually benefit from this blessed month.

Every Ramadan, most women will have about a week in which they are unable to join in the major religious practices of the holy month: fasting and praying. When their menstrual period begins many women find that their level of engagement with the high spiritual atmosphere of the month drops. The same goes for those whose postnatal bleeding coincides with Ramadan. For many of these women, frustration and a sense of lacking spirituality sets in. This, however, shouldn’t be the case.

Menstruation, postnatal bleeding, and other uniquely feminine concerns are all part of Allah’s creation, which He created in perfect wisdom. They are not a punishment for women wanting to draw near their Lord. They are just part of the special package of blessings, opportunities, and challenges that Allaj has given uniquely to women. To refrain from ritual prayer (the salat) and ritual fasting (the sawm) during this time is actually considered a form of worship, and, if done with the intention of obeying Allah, it earns women good deeds.

In order to take full advantage of the blessed month of Ramadan, however, menstruating women and those with postnatal bleeding can do more than refraining from ritual prayer and ritual fasting to draw near Allah. Below are ten ways that women unable to fast can boost their spirituality during this special month.

1. Increase the Remembrance of Allah

In the Hanafi school, it is recommended for menstruating women to make wudu, wear their prayer clothes, and sit on their prayer mat while doing dhikr during the time they would normally be praying. This would be especially good to do in Ramadan, a time of special focus on worship. In addition to the adhkar that are well-known sunnas – such as subhan Allah, alhamdulliLlah and Allahu akbar. If you have a litany from a shaykh and are allowed to repeat it more than once a day, try to do it twice or three times for increased blessings. Dhikr has a special way of touching the heart, and by invoking Allah’s names whenever you can during this unique month you create the space, insha Allah, for beautiful spiritual openings. See: The Effects of Various Dhikr – Habib Ahmad Mashhur al-Haddad

2. Increase Supplication 

Supplication (dua) is something we do very little of these days, but speaking directly to your Lord is one of the most intimate ways to connect with Him. The beauty of supplication is that you can make it in any place or time. Take this opportunity to ask your Lord for all that you need in your life, and to draw near Him through either repeating the beautiful supplications of the Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace, or reaching out to Allah with your own unique words. See: Ten Powerful Duas That Will Change Your Life

3. Feed Others

Whether it be your family, neighbors, community members, or the poor, use the time you are not fasting to make meals that fill the stomachs and souls of those around you. Recite the peace and blessings  (salawat) on the Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him, while making the food, as this imbues the food with spiritual benefit as well. Consider sponsoring iftar at your local mosque one evening with some other women who are in your situation, or volunteering at a local soup kitchen. 

4. Gain Islamic Knowledge

Use the extra time and energy you have from not fasting and praying to increase your knowledge of the faith. Listen to scholars discussing timely issues on our SeekersGuidance podcasts, form a small circle of non-fasting women who can commit to reading a book on Islam and discuss it together, or take some time to read articles on the religion from trusted online sources, such as Shaykh Hamza Yusuf’s blog or Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad’s article collection at masud.co.uk. See also: Importance of Intention in Seeking Knowledge.

5. Increase your Charity

We are surrounded by countless blessings, so make sure to spread those blessings in the month of Ramadan. Give money to a good cause, such as supporting Syrian refugees, helping a local poor family with school fees, or supporting students of Islamic knowledge through SeekersGuidance. In a very busy world, we may have little opportunity to give our time to help others in charity – giving money takes minimal time, but brings great benefit. See: Eligible Zakat Recipients, Giving Locally vs. Abroad, Charity to a Mosque, and Proper Handling of Donations.

6. Make Your Responsibilities a Form of Worship

Sometimes, women are overwhelmed by the responsibilities of the home and young children, and cannot make time to do things like study or sponsor an iftar. In these circumstances, renew your intention regarding your role as a mother and a wife. See these demanding and time-consuming roles for what they are: responsibilities that you are fulfilling to please Allah, which makes them a type of worship. Ask Allah to accept all your work as worship, and approach all that you do in this way. This will make even the most mundane of tasks, such as changing another diaper, cleaning up another spilled cup of apple juice, or making yet another dinner a way for you to gain the pleasure of your Lord. See: Balancing Worship and Caring for a New Child.

7. Listen to the Quran

Although the Hanafi school holds that women cannot touch the mushaf or recite the Qur’an while experiencing menses or postpartum bleeding, they are able to listen to the recitation of the Qur’an. Doing so offers much benefit in a month that has such a heavy emphasis on reciting the book. You can take special time out of your day to listen to it, such as while children are napping, or you can listen to it while in the midst of cooking or cleaning the house. See also: Listening to Qur’an While Occupied With Other Tasks

8. Increase Repentance

Ramadan is an excellent time to increase repentance to Allah. Use moments when others are praying or breaking their fast to ask Allah to forgive you and your loved ones and to keep you from returning to sin. All we have is a gift from Allah, so even forgetting that for a moment is a deed worth asking forgiveness from. Know that Allah is the Forgiving, and trust that, as our scholars have said, the moment you ask for forgiveness you are truly forgiven. See also: Damaged Inner State? Imam Ghazali on Repentance

9. Babysit to Help Mothers Worship

Mothers with young children often find it difficult to go to the mosque because they worry that their kids will disturb others who are praying. Since you don’t need to be at the mosque, volunteer a night or two (or more) to babysit the children of a young mother who would love to go pray tarawih. If you have young children of your own, you can tell the mother to bring her kids to your house before the prayer. By helping this woman worship, you will gain the same good deeds she gets from going to that prayer. See: I Love Being A Woman.

10. Spread Love and Light

Use the extra time and energy you have to share the joys of Ramadan and Eid with your non-Muslim friends, peers, and neighbors. Invite a work colleague for an iftar, make a special Ramadan dish and give it to a neighbor, or take time to make special cookies or gift bags for peers at the office or in school to hand out during Eid. By sharing these happy moments with friends and colleagues in the non-Muslim community, you counter the negative narratives about Islam in the media. More than that, however, you become someone who creates bonds in an increasingly isolated world, reflecting the beauty of the Prophetic light to all those around you. See: How Can Muslims Become More Effective Community Members?

 

How to rectify one’s intention

Question: How do I have proper intentions when seeking ‘ilm? I first started learning about Islam when I found out islamophobia was a thing as a teen, and I wanted to protect the deen, and so I spent a lot of my time in online forums doing that. Now it feels like I only learn to counter this atheist or that Christian better or be praised as knowledgeable by other Muslims. Now I almost instinctively think, “Hey, I can use that in a debate,” or the like when I learn something new. How do I fix this?

Answer:
Assalamu alaykum

Thank you for writing to us.

Intentions and sincerity

The matter you have raised regarding one’s intention when seeking knowledge is of utmost importance. It is commendable that you have come to this realization by yourself and have reached the point where you question your sincerity. This is a great station. The state of a believer is such that he constantly questions the intention behind all his actions.

As for acquiring knowledge for other than the sake of Allah, the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) spoke out against this vehemently. He said, “Whoever seeks sacred knowledge to vie with scholars, argue with fools, or capture public notice, Allah will enter him into Hellfire” [Tirmidhi]

In the book Beginning of Guidance,  Imam Ghazzali said, addressing the one who is desirous of attaining sacred knowledge and who has a great thirst for it, that if he intends thereby to vie and debate, to gain pre-eminence over his contemporaries, to attract the attention of others, or to amass worldly goods, he is striving to destroy both himself and his religion and to exchange eternal life for the life of this world. [Ghazzali, Bidaya]

Thus, we can clearly see that attaining sincerity in the acquisition of knowledge is of the utmost importance. We commend you again for coming to this realization.

Advice on attaining sincerity
The answer to your question of how to attain sincerity is not an easy one. If a simple recipe existed for the attainment of sincerity, we would all be sincere. However, it is a continuous struggle.

Our teachers advise the seeker to check his intention before embarking on any action. He should ask himself why he is acting before he does it, while he is doing it, and after he has done it.

The Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) also taught us to seek Allah’s pardon after performing a good deed, such as salah, in case insincerity has crept into the deed.

I advise you strongly to recite Imam al-Haddad’s intentions whenever you study or attend a class because they are comprehensive in meaning and filled with light. They will benefit you as Allah will cause you to be sincere in your life. You may find those intentions here: http://winterspringmawlid.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/The-Intention-for-Seeking-Knowledge-by-Imam-haddad.pdf.

Also, turn to Allah often, praying to Him, asking Him, crying to Him so that He grants you sincerity. No one can attain sincerity unless Allah grants it to him, so seek sincerity from the One in Whose hand sincerity lies.

Please see:

https://seekersguidance.org/courses/how-to-seek-islamic-knowledge-imam-ghazalis-proper-manners-of-students-explained/

May Allah grant us sincerity in all our deeds and actions, and may he protect us from showing off and doing things for the sake of others.

And Allah knows best.
Shaykh Abdurragmaan Khan

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Abdurragmaan received ijazah ’ammah from various luminaries, including but not restricted to: Habib Umar ibn Hafiz—a personality who affected him greatly and who has changed his relationship with Allah, Maulana Yusuf Karaan—the former Mufti of Cape Town; Habib ‘Ali al-Mashhur—the current Mufti of Tarim; Habib ‘Umar al-Jaylani—the Shafi‘i Mufti of Makkah; Sayyid Ahmad bin Abi Bakr al-Hibshi; Habib Kadhim as-Saqqaf; Shaykh Mahmud Sa’id Mamduh; Maulana Abdul Hafiz al-Makki; Shaykh Ala ad-Din al-Afghani; Maulana Fazlur Rahman al-Azami and Shaykh Yahya al-Gawthani amongst others.

Teaching without knowledge

Question: Is it sinful to teach what one has not specifically studied with a teacher?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

If one is teaching something very general and one is certain that what one is saying is accurate and well-known, it is okay to share hadiths and verses of the Qur’an in a way that could be labeled as teaching.

However, one should not simply read tafsirs or commentaries on hadith and then go and explain the Qur’an and Sunna to a group of people if one has not studied fiqh, aqida, Arabic grammar, morphology, and rhetoric, usul al-fiqh, and tafsir and Hadith formally. Just picking up Fath al-Bari, for example, and reading out what it says to a congregation is dangerous. One can quite easily make mistakes and misrepresent the religion.

One should learn properly before one teaches unless one is told specifically by one of one’s teachers to teach something from a specific book within a particular scope.

For an idea of how to study properly, please see:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGGKhY9OLRg

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/importance-of-intention-in-seeking-knowledge/

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/seeking-sacred-knowledge/

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid

 

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years, he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language.

How Does One Go About Learning Islam?

Question:

How does one go about learning Islam?

Answer:

In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful and Compassionate,

 

The Importance of Seeking Knowledge

The religion of Islam is very vast. It engages the Muslim on every level: physically, spiritually, and intellectually/rationally. For this reason, Allah Most High and His Messenger (Allah bless him and give him peace) command us to seek it.

Allah Most High says, “Ask the people of knowledge if you do not know.” [Qur’an; 16:43]

The Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) said, “Seeking knowledge is obligatory on every Muslim.” [Tabarani; Bayhaqi]

From the above, we can see both the importance of knowledge as well as a command to actively seek it out.

 

Earned vs. Gifted Knowledge

The nature of seeking Islamic knowledge is that it must be acquired through diligent seeking and studying. This is called acquired knowledge (kasbi). However, as the student learns and implements their knowledge, Allah Most High opens doors of deeper knowledge for them. This knowledge is referred to as gifted knowledge (wahbi).

To this effect, the following verse alludes:

Allah Most High says, “Be mindful of Allah, for Allah will teach you. And Allah has ˹perfect˺ knowledge of all things.” [Qur’an; 2:282]

 

The Beginning of the Path to Knowledge

– Qualified Sources of Knowledge

The most essential factor in one’s seeking knowledge is connecting oneself to an authentic chain of transmission going back to the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace).

The Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) said, “…Indeed the scholars are the inheritors of the Prophets. The Prophets did not leave us inheritance gold nor silver. They only left behind knowledge, so whoever takes of it, has taken a plentiful share.” [Tirmidhi]

The statement inheriting from the Prophets alludes to the passing down of knowledge from person to person, generation after generation. This passing down of knowledge is referred to by the scholars as to the Isnad or chain of transmission.

Imam Muslim narrates that ‘Abdullah bin Mubarak (Allah be pleased with him) said, “The Isnad is from the religion. If it was not for the isnad, whoever wished could say want they want (about the religion).” [Muslim]

You should strive to seek out a qualified scholar who learned at the feet of qualified scholars and them from qualified scholars back to the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace).

In the past, this proved difficult, and many famous scholars of the religion traveled far and wide seeking out such people. It is a blessing of Allah Most High that we have access to SeekersGuidance, as it is its central aim to provide authentic knowledge to everyone who seeks it, for free.

– Strategy

As you alluded to in your question, there are many areas in which one can study. For this reason, it is important to go into it with a plan.

Generally, Islamic studies are attained in layers increasing in complexity as one progresses. Thus you should start with the foundational basic studies of the following three subjects:

1. Islamic Beliefs: what is obligatory for the Muslim to know with regards to Allah, His Messengers, and the transmitted beliefs of the Qur’an and Prophetic teachings.

2. Islamic Jurisprudence: what is obligatory for the Muslim to know with regards to purification, prayer, fasting, Zakat, and Hajj; as well as what is permissible or impermissible in other aspects of life.

3. Islamic Spirituality: what is obligatory for the Muslim to know with regards to acquiring the praiseworthy character traits and removing the blameworthy character traits.

Thereafter, you will move on to a more detailed study of the above sciences and others.

– Supplication (du’a) and Time

There is only one thing that the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) was commanded to ask for an increase in in the Qur’an. That thing is knowledge.

Allah Most High says, “Say, (O Prophet)! My Lord! Increase me in knowledge.” [Qur’an; 20:114]

The seeking of knowledge is a lifetime goal. As you increase in knowledge of the religion, you will find that the Qur’an and the Prophetic legacy are inexhaustible of knowledge and that there is always more to understand.

 

The Virtues of Seeking Knowledge

Due to the immense importance of knowledge and the effort that is needed in its acquisition – its virtues are likewise immense.

Allah Most High declares the uniqueness of the rank of the people of knowledge over others throughout the Qur’an. He says, “Say, O Prophet, “Are those who know equal to those who do not know?” None will be mindful ˹of this˺ except people of reason…” [Qur’an; 39:9]

The Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) said, “Whoever travels a path, seeking therein knowledge, Allah facilitates for them a path to Paradise. Indeed the Angels lay down their wings out of contentment for the seeker of knowledge. Indeed all the inhabitants of the Heavens and the Earth seek forgiveness for the scholar, even the fish in the sea. The merit of the scholar over the mere worshipper it that of the moon over the rest of the stars. Indeed the scholars are the inheritors of the Prophets. The Prophets did not leave us inheritance gold nor silver. They only left behind knowledge, so whoever takes of it, has taken a plentiful share.” [Tirmidhi]

 

Advice

Please consider the Islamic Studies Curriculum offered here at www.seekersguidance.org. Classes are free and cover a range of important subjects with gradually increasing complexity from authentic teachers.

Please see: The Straight Path Online: A Roadmap for Beneficial Islamic Learning

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3XM0vg2fR0

I hope this helps,
Allah knows best.
[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

 

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a teacher of Arabic, Islamic law, and spirituality. After accepting Islam in 2008, he then completed four years at the Darul Uloom seminary in New York where he studied Arabic and the traditional sciences. He then traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he stayed for three years studying in Dar Al-Mustafa under some of the greatest scholars of our time, including Habib Umar Bin Hafiz, Habib Kadhim al-Saqqaf, and Shaykh Umar al-Khatib. In Tarim, Shaykh Yusuf completed the memorization of the Qur’an and studied beliefs, legal methodology, hadith methodology, Qur’anic exegesis, Islamic history, and a number of texts on spirituality. He joined the SeekersGuidance faculty in the summer of 2019.

What Steps Should I Take To Become an Islamic Scholar?

Question:

How does a sister of Islam become a student of knowledge? How can a sister find a scholar to study under, or a school to attend full-time to become a scholar, where the classes are not on-line but in person to achieve the full benefit of learning?

Answer:

Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for your question. Sister, you will find that 150+ courses right here at SeekersGuidance will bring you far beyond your personally obligatory knowledge, and I encourage you to finish the certificates that we offer. Please see these links in order to find more answers to your question:
https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/can-i-become-a-scholar-by-studying-with-seekersguidance/
https://seekersguidance.org/tag/becoming-a-scholar/

Other than what the scholars have mentioned above, I only know of Dar al-Uloom schools, which offer programs of Sacred Knowledge and memorization of the Qur’an. Graduates of these schools are usually sent to different parts of the world to become imams at mosques or to lead tarawih in Ramadan. May Allah give you the best of this world and the next and help bring your sincere intention to learn for the sake of Allah to fruition.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

 

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

What Should I Do If My Father Will Not Let Me Practice My Religion?

Question:

I am in the twelfth grade, and I have two issues. I want to study in a madrasa and become a scholar, and I want to marry any religious woman who covers properly. My father will not allow either because we are from a modern family.

Answer:

Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for your question. I am sorry that you are in this predicament and that your father has different standards for you. The bottom line is that your father does not own you, and you should proceed in the way that you desire. Your parents should be obeyed in the permissible, but not in disobedience.

Marrying a woman who is not religious could ruin your life and the religion of your children, so you are making the right choice by choosing a partner for religion. I cannot commend you more for this mindset, ma sha Allah.

As for your career, it is very honorable to study Sacred Knowledge, and scholars are the inheritors of Prophets because of what they convey. As a man, you must have a plan for financial stability as well, and I pray that you can accomplish both. I know Muslim scholars who have engineering degrees, and I know doctors who spend all of their free time studying Islam.

You should pray istikhara and follow your heart. I pray that you can find that balance in order to study your religion and still support a family. Nothing is more deserving of respect than a scholar who supports his family independently and brings benefits to others. May Allah give you the best of this world and the next.

Please see these links for more detail:

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/can-i-pursue-a-career-that-goes-against-my-parents-wishes/

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/i-want-to-study-islam-abroad-but-parents-insist-on-me-staying-at-home/

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/seeking-knowledge/avoid-pursuing-islamic-studies-paying-parents-mortgage/

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/seeking-knowledge/modern-scholars-importance-seeking-knowledge-reader/

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Is It Necessary To Acquire Sacred Knowledge Before Action? 

Question: Do I need to know the ruling of something before doing it?
Answer:
In the Name of Allah, Most Merciful and Compassionate
Assalamu ‘alaykum dear brother/sister in faith,
Allah commands us to worship Him, alone, and to follow the Sunna of His Messenger (Allāh’s peace and blessings be upon him and his folk).  This requires knowledge.
It is an individual obligation (fard ‘ayn) upon every Muslim to acquire the knowledge of :
(a)   The Islamic creed
(b)  The Fiqh of Worship
(c)   The Fiqh of those matters that one encounters in their immediate (or future) dealings
This is to ensure that one does not fall into sin – in belief or action — without realizing it.
Make sincere repentance for any negligence in fulfilling this obligation, then devise a consistent plan on how to rectify based on the priorities mentioned above.
Consider enrolling in the following courses :

https://seekersguidance.org/courses/what-muslims-believe-and-why/

https://seekersguidance.org/courses/living-right-halal-and-haram-and-living-prophetic-excellence-hanafi/

May Allah bless your journey to knowledge, which – like Paradise — has a beginning, but no end.

Allah, Most High, knows best.

[Ustadha] Iman Badawi

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani