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What Should Do About Missed Days of Fast Due to Dialysis?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

I have been diagnosed with ESRD. I was extremely sick last year and did not fast. I paid the fidyah for all my missed fasts of the past. This year I feel much better. I can only fast on my off days from dialysis. After Ramadan do I have to make up all fasts that I will miss because of dialysis? Will I have to make up all of last years fast for which I paid the fidyah?

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

I pray that this message finds you well, insha’Allah. May Allah Most High grant you a complete recovery by His Infinite Grace.

According to the Hanafi School, expiatory payments (fidya) are not due nor valid except in the case of established chronic inability to fast that will last until death.

Further, if you made the payments after validly meeting the criteria, yet subsequently gained the ability and strength to fast, you would need to make those missed fasts up (qada’).

However, this wouldn’t negate the reward of having made the payments out of worship and sincerity. Allah Most High says that He “never wastes the reward of those who do good.” [9:120]

As for intravenous medication (IV), it doesn’t affect the validity of the fast as the skin pores aren’t a legally valid point of entry. Hence, you you can fast on your dialysis days too.

[ShaykhiZada, Majma‘ al-Anhur Sharh Multaqa al-Abhur]

Please also see: Brief Overview of Expiatory Payments (fidya) and: Making Up for Fasts Missed Due to Illness and Menstruation and: Too Sick to Fast in Ramadan, Too Poor to Pay the Expiatory Payment (Fidya)

And Allah Most High alone knows best.

wassalam,
[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.

What Can I Do During Ramadan If I Am Sick?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam

Question: Assalam alaykum

I have been diagnosed with a medical condition called IC. It results in excruciating pain in bladder and frequent urination.The condition requires me to sip water all day. Can I abstain from food but still sip water to avoid the pain (provided I feed the hungry for all my fasts)?

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

I pray that this message finds you well, insha’Allah. May Allah Most High bless you with a complete cure.

If (a) the pain is recurring and unbearable without daytime medication, and (b) drinking water will act as an effective form of such medication, and (c) the physician has approved of this, and affirmed that avoiding medication will pose undue hardship and distress, then you can leave the fast now and make it up at a later date.

As such, you can eat and drink to maintain your health, as normal. Remember that the worship of Ramadan is to fast for those who can, and to abstain, for those who have a genuine excuse to do otherwise because nobody has a right to harm themselves.

Allah Most High says, “So any one of you who is present that month should fast, and anyone who is ill or on a journey should make up for the lost days by fasting on other days later. God wants ease for you, not hardship.” [2:185]

Note that there are no expiatory payments (fidya) to make until the condition is both chronic and will last until death.

For advice on how to have a productive Ramadan without fasting, please see: Worship in Ramadan For a Menstruating Woman and: 10 Ways of Benefit for Menstruating Women in Ramadan

[‘Ala’ al-Din ‘Abidin, al-Hadiyya al-‘Ala’iyya]

And please also see: Brief Overview of Expiatory Payments (fidya)

And Allah Most High alone knows best.

wassalam,
[Ustadh] Tabraze Azam

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Tabraze Azam holds a BSc in Computer Science from the University of Leicester, where he also served as the President of the Islamic Society. He memorised the entire Qur’an in his hometown of Ipswich at the tender age of sixteen, and has since studied the Islamic Sciences in traditional settings in the UK, Jordan and Turkey. He is currently pursuing advanced studies in Jordan, where he is presently based with his family.

Can Holistic Medicines Practically Help Someone In The Religion? by Shaykh Jamir Meah

In his last article, Shaykh Jamir Meah discussed the concepts of health and disease within an Islamic framework. He also looked at the law of vibration. In the final article of this series, Shaykh Jamir looks at how holistic treatment and its principles practically benefits the believer and can help in their relationship with Allah Most High.

As we’ve mentioned previously, true health occurs when the whole person is functioning harmoniously on all levels, and is able to fulfil his or herself socially and spiritually. The goal of every true physician should be to guide each patient to this point as much as is possible through medicine.

How can holistic medicines help someone in their religion?

Holistic therapies such as homeopathy and traditional Chinese acupuncture reach the dynamic level of the human being, the level of pure energy, the Vital Force or Qi in Chinese Medicine. The Vital Force or Qi is where the real disturbance is, and when healing takes place on this level, the curative effect ripples throughout the whole organism, from centre outwards.

Given the above, it is natural to ask, how can holistic medicines practically help someone in the religion?

There is a strong connection between medicine and religious practice, and both are obviously invaluable in our lives. Just as we need this world in order to succeed in the next, we need medicine to grant us the ability to have mental and physical health to be able to fulfil our religious objectives.

This is why Imam al Shafi’i (May Allah be pleased with him) said, ‘Indeed, knowledge is of two types: knowledge of the religion and knowledge of the world. The knowledge of religion is to achieve understanding (fiqh) and the knowledge of the world is medicine.’ [Adab al Shafi’i].

Holistic medicine can greatly assist someone in the religion and in spirituality, or even someone who may not be particularly spiritual, but seeking more profound or alternative meanings in an overwhelmingly materialistic world.

A basic example from a real life case

Mr Ahmad comes for treatment for multiple sclerosis. During the consultation we find that since childhood he has always had a fear of poverty. During his twenties, he developed a tendency to buy useless items and hoard them. He has a fear of the dark and is terrified of death. He describes himself as religious though very materialistic. He finds it a struggle to progress in the religion in the way he feels he should. He finds faults with others very easily, has a very suspicious nature, and admits that he backbites people all the time. At the same time, he never desires to be alone and needs company. He feels an inner restlessness but doesn’t know why. This has caused many difficulties his personal and work.

After the 5 weeks of treatment, the patient reports in the first month an inner sense of calm as opposed to his restlessness. Over the course of treatment, the improvement steadily continues and Mr. Ahmad doesn’t feel the fear of poverty so intensely, though it is still there and can be quite crippling. The MS is still there but not as intense. At the eight month follow up he declares that he has started to get rid of some of his hoarded goods, and genuinely feels much more energetic and positive. Others have also noticed a change in his character, describing him as more affable and cynical.

Just over a year later, he states that he no longer senses a fear of poverty, and any thoughts of darkness and death are few and far between, and almost negligible. This has made a big difference in his whole outlook to life, work and his relationships, and most importantly his religious aspirations. He states that whereas reading the Qu’ran previously felt like a chore, he now was eager to read it daily, and he has started feeling some of the old zeal for the religion slowly coming back. His MS has disappeared completely.

These types of cases are very common. What happened is that the treatment affected the patient’s deepest being, and this in turn created an awareness within him of his diseased state. By becoming inwardly aware that his fears, delusions, and reactions, were disproportionate to real life, he was able to subconsciously let go, so that he no longer feared poverty, and was no longer terrified of the dark and of death, which was no doubt in this case a fear of losing material wealth, after all what is death but a step into the unknown, the dark, and a parting from the worldly possessions?

The treatment had an effect on all levels of his being, healing the physical manifestation of the inner disease (MS in this case), and changed his whole perception and dealings with everything and everyone around him.

One may view the role of such treatment as a ‘clearing out,’ ‘getting rid of unwanted baggage’ and ‘putting things in order.’ This is usually very difficult for people to do on their own. You can tell a person to get over an abnormal fear, to snap out of depression, or find ways to deal with chronic anxiety, but more often than not, they simply can’t. They just don’t have the will power or creativity to move forward, and so they remain stuck.

Because correct treatment reaches the higher planes of a person, it instigates the person to rouse up from the rut they find themselves in and see the reality of their situation. The person’s perceptions and reactions change, and they find themselves with a new inner strength and self-confidence, which enables them to think and decide with new found clarity, far-sightedness and purpose. When his takes place, the person starts to make the necessary changes in life they need in order to move towards their goal, productively and creatively.

In summary, it frees up the person to be open to, as Samuel Hahnemann said, ‘the higher purpose of our existence’.

Hering’s Law

Hering’s Law, named after Constantine Hering, the physician who observed and formulated the law, refers to the direction in which the symptoms of the patient will disappear during a cure under natural treatment. It is indispensable in practice. The Law states that real cure takes place:

From within outwards.
From above downwards.
From a more important organ to a less important one.
In the reverse order of their coming.

There’s a lot that can be said in regards this Law and how it aligns one’s natural vibration (discussed previously), however what is worth deducing from it for our benefit here is that it is applicable in the cure of us as individual believers and as an Ummah.

Allah Most High tells us in the oft quoted verse, ‘God changes not what is in a people, until they change what is in themselves’ [13:11]. In order for change to occur, it has to start within. As individuals and as a nation, we have to look at the ills that we have as a community and work towards improving and finding solutions to those issues. When we change as individuals, as communities, and as an ummah, then this will have an effect on everything around us. Inner order leads to outward order, healing is from within outwards.

Likewise, a just leader who takes himself into account and sets a good example, instils goodness into his subjects and guides them to goodness in both worlds, and in this way, whole nations are healed and guided. Like a father and mother guiding their children, from above downwards, the more senior figures set the standard in their own lives and through their own behaviour, and this has a rippling effect on those under their care. Such were the leaderships and guidance of the Prophets, the Rightly Guided Caliphs, and the pious leaders of our communities.

Why can families, communities and nations grow so strong when pulling together in the same direction? Because everyone’s vibration is in tandem. And when this harmony occurs, ‘The similitude of believers, in their love, mercy, and compassion for each other, are like one body.’ [Muslim]

Allah is the Healer

Finally, we should end this series with the reminder that while discussing the many benefits and wonders of natural holistic medicine, it is ultimately Allah alone that heals, and not through any power of the medicine, nor any ability of the physician.

Just like fire does not have the intrinsic power to burn, nor the knife the inherent ability to cut, it is our belief that no substance has healing properties in of themselves, but rather, it is Allah who creates the relationship between the medicine and the healing effect through his Will and Power.

O Lord of the people! Remove the difficulty and bring about healing as You are the Healer. There is no healing but Your Healing, a healing that will leave no ailment.’ [Sahih al Bukhari]

[cwa id=’cta’]

What Dua To Recite When Sick, from Habib Muhammad bin Ali al-Junayd

Shaykh Yahya Rhodus mentioned what he described as a “prayer for healing” that was given to him by Habib Muhammad bin Ali al-Junayd. With his permission, we produce it here for all to benefit.

BISMILLAH AL-RAHMAN AL-RAHIM

Dua To Recite When Sick
Allahumma Salli wa sallim ‘ala Sayyidina Muhammadin al-Hadi ila tariq al-milla. Allahumma salli wa sallim ‘ala Sayyidina Muhammad wa bi jahihi isrif ‘anni kulla maradin wa alamin wa waja’in wa ‘illa (then, mention the particular sickness), wa ‘ala alihi wa sahbih.
Oh Allah bless and bestow peace upon Sayyiduna Muhammad, the Guide to the path of religion. Oh Allah bless and bestow peace upon Sayyiduna Muhammad, and through his rank, remove from me every illness, pain, ailment, and disease, and upon his Family and Companions.

Dua To Recite When Sick and Other Resources for Seekers:

Classifying the Hadith on Rectifying Faith Through Poverty and Affluence, Sickness and Good Health, and Prevention from Extra Worship

Answered by Ustadh Salman Younas

Question: Is this hadith qudsi correctly attributed attributed to imam tabarani? Has he classed is authentic?

“Allah said, “Verily, from amongst My slaves is he whose faith cannot be rectified except by being inflicted with poverty, and were I to enrich him, it would surely corrupt him. Verily, from amongst My slaves is he whose faith cannot be rectified except by wealth and affluence, and were I to deprive him, it would surely corrupt him. Verily, from amongst My slaves is he whose faith cannot be rectified except by good health, and were I to make him sick, it would surely corrupt him. Verily, from amongst My slaves is he whose faith cannot be rectified except by disease and illness, and were I to make him healthy, it would surely corrupt him. Verily, from amongst My slaves is he who seeks worship by a certain act but I prevent that from him so that self-amazement does not enter his heart. Certainly, I run the affairs of My slaves by My Knowledge of what is in their hearts. Certainly, I am the All-Knower, All-Aware’.”

Answer: assalamu `alaykum

The narration you mention has been cited with different wordings.

1. The wording you mention was related from Anas ibn Malik (Allah be well pleased with him) by Ibn `Asakir in his Tarikh, Ibn Abi al-Dunya in Kitab al-Awliya’, Abu Nu`aym in the Hilya, Bayhaqi in Asma wa’l Sifat, Baghawi in Sharh al-Sunna, and others.

This narration is weak due to the weakness of some its narrators, namely Hasan ibn Yahya al-Khushani and Sadaqat al-Dimashqi. [Mizzi, Tahdhib al-Kamal; Ibn Hajar, Taqrib al-Tahdhib]

2. It was also related by `Umar (Allah be well pleased with him) by Khatib in his Tarikh. The chain of this narration, however, is not free from blemish.

3. There is a similar narration relating to poverty and richness, without mentioning health, sickness, or worship, related from Ibn `Abbas by Tabarani in his Mu`ajam al-Kabir, with some additions. In the Majma` al-Zawa’id, al-Haytami says that there are people unknown to him within the chain. In addition to this, some of the narrators are weak and abandoned (matruk), such as `Ubayd ibn Kathir. [Ibn Hajar, Lisan al-Mizan]

To conclude, the narration you inquired about is present in the works dedicated to gathering the prophetic narrations. However, the chains of each are not free from defects of varying degrees, which would require a deeper analysis by a specialist in the field.

Wassalam
Salman

Checked & Approved by Faraz Rabbani