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What Is a Good Supplication to Make for Studying?

Question: What is a good dua to make for studying?

Answer: Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your question.

The dua you mentioned is a nice one, and there is certainly no harm in using it. I don’t think it is ascribed to the Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) though, or any of his Companions for that matter.

There is a nice dua for the ease that is authentic:

Allahumma la sahla illa ma ja’altahu sahla Wa anta tajalu l-hazna idha shi’ta sahlan.

O Allah, nothing is easy save that which You make easy,
And You make that which is hard easy if You so wish. (Ibn Hibban and others)

If you start talking about something else, there is no need to repeat, but there is also no harm in repeating from time to time.

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh] Farid Dingle

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

I Want to Stop Working So I Can Study Islam

Question: I’ve worked most of my married life but have always longed to study Islam. I’ve decided to study next year but my husband says I am unfair and impulsive. There will be pressure on him but I plan to sell things to supplement the income. Will I be rejecting sustenance by giving up my job? 

Answer: Assalamu alaykum sister,

I want to congratulate you on your intention and plan to study Islam. We don’t have enough female scholars, let alone enough women who know the basics of their religion.

Your job

It is not rejecting your sustenance when you are leaving a job that involves interest. Rather it is choosing your Lord over something that He dislikes. It is obligatory for you to learn your religion correctly and not obligatory for you to contribute to household expenses. Rest assured that your sustenance (rizq) is guaranteed for you, and you don’t know whence it will come. Quitting a job does not at all mean a change in Allah’s provisions for you. I also commend that you’re taking the means to supplement by selling things from home.

Pressure on your husband

You may find that the pressure on your husband is correctly placed. Allowing him to solely take on the position of a breadwinner can be very beneficial for the family. The money will be treated more consciously and carefully. Spending wisely with a budget can still ensure a comfortable lifestyle. And most importantly, the self-respect and confidence that he will have will surely boost him up. Just be sure to constantly remind him what a wonderful job he is doing and thank him profusely for taking the stress off of your back.

Transitioning

The transition for the first year won’t be easy. Have a plan to live on a thought-out budget, be very organized in the home now that you will be home, and provide him with fresh homemade food often so that he can feel the tangible benefits of this transition. Instant pots and crock pots are key. Remember to still make time for him when he comes home despite your studies. Be patient in the beginning and make du`a that Allah put blessings (barakah) in everyone’s time and money.

See the following link for more excellent information:

Can a Husband Prevent His Wife From Working?
Reflections from the SeekersHub Retreat: “I Want to Study to be an Islamic Scholar”

May Allah rewards you for your intentions and give you success.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Can I Study at a University to Become a Professor?

Question: I wish to study at a university like Harvard and become a professor of Political science or History. Is it permissible to study there political science? Is it halal for me to become a professor of political science or history and teach at a university? Will my earnings be halal?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum,

1) Yes, it is permissible to study at Harvard if they only take student term-time work from you. This is part of their financial aid package.

2) It is permissible to pursue a degree in political science or history. Muslims educated in all subjects are needed around the world and systems of government must be understood by Muslims so we can make a difference. With this intention, the degree is considered beneficial and praiseworthy.

3) If you teach as a university professor, your earnings will be permissible (halal). The Prophet, may Allah bless him and give him peace, said, “This world is cursed and what is in it is cursed, except the remembrance of Allah (dhikr) and what is conducive to that, and the teacher and the student” [Ibn Majah]. Teaching has a great honor in Islam, and with good intention, your reward may be magnified.

May Allah give you success in all your endeavors.

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer, and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterward, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic, and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Shaykh Faraz Rabbani on Seeking Beneficial Knowledge

In this series of five videos, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani answers some common questions people ask about seeking knowledge.

 

1. Why study Islam?
2. Don’t I know enough already?
3. What should I prioritize in my study?
4. Who should I study with?
5. When reconnecting or considering Islam, where do I begin?

Resources for Seekers

The Blessed Experience of Seeking Knowledge, by Shaykh Faiz Qureshy
Ten Adab of Seekers of Knowledge
Importance of Intention in Seeking Knowledge
10 Steps to Firm-Footedness in Seeking Knowledge of Fiqh

Intention for Seeking Knowledge by Imam Haddad

In this article, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani provides commentary on Imam Haddad’s famous “Intention for Seeking Knowledge.” Text and translation of this supplication is also provided.

In the Name of Allah, the Merciful and Compassionate.

The Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace, said, “Actions are by their intentions, and each person shall have whatsoever they intended.” (Bukhari and Muslim)

The reality of our actions is not merely what we do, but also why we do it. As Ibn Ata’illah explained, “Actions are lifeless forms, whose soul is the subtle reality of sincerity within them.” (Hikam al Ata’iyya)

Seeking Knowledge as a Spiritual Work

Seeking sacred knowledge (talab al-ilm) has been described in the Qur’an and Sunna as one of the highest of spiritual works. Thus, a sincere intention is particularly important.

Seeking knowledge can also be a source of honor and recognition in this world. This can be dangerous, as it can result in sinful inward traits such as pride, conceit, and arrogance. Only sincere intentions can protect a person, and fulfill the spiritual potential of seeking knowledge.

What is an Intention?

The scholars explain that an intention (niyya) is, “The resolve to (a) perform an act of obedience to Allah, (b) drawing closer to Allah thereby, (c) at the beginning of one’s action.” (Taftazani, quoted by Ibn Abidin, Radd al-Muhtar)

This has three components:
(a) “The resolve to perform an act of obedience” entails mindful, purposeful action. Bring to mind what are you doing, and that you are doing it as an act of obedience.
(b)“ … drawing closer to Allah…” entails bringing to mind that you are acting for the sake of Allah alone – seeking His Closeness, Love, Good Pleasure, and reward.
(c) “… at the beginning of the action,” entails pausing for a moment before you begin any action, at any time, in order to renew your resolve.

What is Sincerity?

Sincerity, or ikhlas, is the heart of Islam. It is defined by the scholars as, “Seeking to draw closer to Allah with one’s actions, without any ulterior motive.” (Qushayri)

Sahl ibn Abd Allah said, “The intelligent looked at sincerity, and the best description they found is that it is for one’s motions and rest – in private and in public – to be for Allah alone without partner, without anything being mixed into one’s motives. Not one’s ego, nor one’s whims, nor any merely worldly aspirations.” (Bayhaqi, Shu‘ab al-Iman)

Imam Haddad’s Intention for Knowledge: A Practical Means for Making High Intentions

Part of having sincere intentions (al-niyya al-saliha) is to reflect deeply on all the multiple ways one is seeking the Pleasure of Allah through one’s actions. This is called “multiplying one’s intention,” or ta’addud al-niyya.

Because such deep reflection is rare for most of us, the scholars compiled statements of intention to help us make high, transformative intentions before we act.

One such powerful statement of intention for seeking knowledge is Imam Abd Allah ibn Alawi al-Haddad’s “Intention for Seeking Sacred Knowledge.”

This intention defines both the ultimate purpose of seeking knowledge – “seeking Allah Himself, His Good Pleasure, Closeness, and Reward” –  as well as the multiple ways one can make one’s knowledge sincerely for Allah.

The scholars encourage making it a deliberate, purposeful habit to make such a statement of intention – in one’s heart or uttered – every time one begins studying, teaching, reading, or listening to Islamic knowledge.

Imam Haddad’s Intention for Seeking Knowledge


 

How To Avoid Being A "Know-It-All", by Shaykh Shuaib Ally

You should be involved in Islamic learning, argues Shaykh Shuaib Ally. A large reason for that involves a trait that, when lacking, cripples a person’s ability to develop their knowledge base: intellectual humility.

A lack of intellectual humility manifests itself, in discussions related to the Islamic sciences, in various forms. A common expression is for me to arrive at a certain opinion, say, related to a legal matter. I then imagine that I alone understand what the ruling ought to be, and that none others hold a correct view.
However, it is unlikely that my opinion finds no precedent whatsoever in an academic history that spans over 1400 odd years and large swathes of the globe. Such a belief instead derives from my misguided belief in the unique and special nature of my own outlook.
It would be bad enough if this were the lone result of this form of intellectual arrogance. Worse is the nefarious corollary of such a belief, my belief that the fact this unique understanding is not being currently championed must be due to one of two reasons.
One is that the vast majority of scholars are being academically dishonest and are hiding what is the correct opinion for their own ends. The other is that it really is the fact that the understanding I have arrived at has no precedent whatsoever in the inherited tradition. I then take this to be demonstrative of the fact that established scholarship has nothing serious to offer.
This is, of course, wrongheaded.
It is unlikely that there is some sort of conspiracy to cover up aspects of scholarship in Islamic history; in fact, scholarly works are quite good at recording non-mainstream opinions, if for no other reason than academic curiosity. It is simply more likely that scholars have chosen another opinion for other reasons, and that is the one that people are most familiar with.
Moreover, my being unaware of a certain opinion within a body of scholarship hardly indicates that the community of scholarship itself is somehow compromised. More often than not, it simply reflects a gap in my own knowledge base. That is, it says more about me than about the discipline I am considering defective.
In this regard, the late 3rd C Shāfiʿī jurist poet, Mansūr b. Ismāʿīl al-Tamīmī, recited:

Those of diminished intellect critique the study of law
Yet their blame does not affect it in the least
The morning sun rising in the horizon remains unharmed
By those without sight remaining oblivious to its light

Let me give you an example. Imagine I believe that astronomical calculations should be used in lieu of naked eye sightings to determine the beginning and end of months in the lunar calendar. I could have very good reasons for arguing this. Classical scholars, I might argue, worked in a medieval period in which the sciences were not as developed, and therefore did not consider astronomical calculations as possible. I might go on to argue that in the modern age, we have precise methods of measurement, and that this should allow for the formulation of new rulings.
This would be an example of intellectual arrogance because classical works do consider astronomical calculations being used for this purpose; these discussions are alluded to in even fairly elementary works of law. When I make such a claim, I am arrogantly making claims about the absence of a discussion in a certain literature, betraying my lack of knowledge of preceding discussion.
My viewing scholars at large with suspicion, and believing them to be unwilling to entertain this discussion, would likewise be intellectually arrogant. This is because they are skirting an issue; they have simply chosen another opinion for other reasons.
The intellectual arrogance here is born out of a misguided sense of my own academic breadth. This arrogance is criticized famously by Abu Nuwas, the 2nd C Abbasid poet famous for the licentious content of his work, who recited:

Say to one who claims a special understanding:
You have gathered a little bit, but even more escapes you!

This lack of knowledge is therefore exacerbated by my lack of intellectual humility. Had I bothered to engage in the disciplines that purport to deal with the subject matter under consideration, I might have found at the very least a suitable starting point for their research.
However, rejecting at the outset anything a scholarly class busies itself with as having little intellectual worth has necessarily restricted me from benefiting from it. Due diligence demands being thorough in researching my claims prior to making them, but my preconceived notions about the undeveloped nature of the Islamic disciplines have led me to bypass that.
These preconceived notions are often coupled by an actual inability to access scholarly discussions on a given subject. That is, intellectual arrogance has blocked me from acquiring the requisite knowledge of the Islamic disciplines, primary or supporting, such that I can actually engage the textual tradition on the issues I purports to have special knowledge of. Indeed, there is often a correlation between lack of learning and intellectual arrogance.


A lack of intellectual humility can also express itself in my conception of others and their practice. Part of intellectual humility is understanding that while I believe and act in a certain manner, others may have good reason for doing or believing something that is at odds with this. Intellectual humility demands coming to terms with this, even if I do not understand the reason for others choosing another course, or even if I have never come across the rationale underlying their chosen course.
When I am intellectually arrogant, however, I am unable to do this. Instead, I presumptuously think that knowledge begins and ends only with what I myself has come across and understand.This allows me to pompously insist on my own position at all costs, assuming it to be the only correct position. It also allows me to judge others, believing their positions to be inadequate without having actually assessed their merit, and rejecting from the outset anything they could have to say in response as having intellectual worth.
Rejecting something simply because it is unfamiliar is, however, behaviour the Qurʾan criticizes as unbecoming. Imam al- Qurtubī, the famous 7th C Andalusian exegete, mentions that al-Husayn b. al-Fadl, a 3rd C Nishapuri exegete, was asked, Does the Qur’an contain the idea that whoever is ignorant of something opposes it? He said: Yes, in two places: They disbelieve in anything their own knowledge does not encompass (10:39); and If they have not been guided to something, they say, this is an ancient lie (46:11).


Another form of intellectual arrogance can manifest itself when I have acquired some knowledge, and suddenly consider myself intellectually superior to all others, even those who are far above me in their level of scholarship, including my own teachers. Al-Jāhiz, the 3rd C Abbasid polymath, recited these famous lines from the perspective of a teacher complaining of such a situation:

How curious, the one I reared from childhood; I would feed with the tips of my fingers
I taught him to shoot; when his arms became strong, he fired at me
How often I trained him in verse; when he began to recite, he attacked me
I taught him manliness, daily; when his mustache began to grow, he abandoned me
When I act in such a manner, I become the instantiation of the warning that a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing, as it has contributed to my inflated sense of worth, instead of increasing my humility.

 


The good news is that the cure to intellectual arrogance is fairly straightforward. It is to actually engage in sincere learning. This is why I think you should engage in Islamic learning.
The bad news is that doing so isn’t particularly easy, in that it is much easier to simply be pompous. Acquiring real knowledge takes work.
There is an indication of this difficulty in that the Prophet Muhammad – peace and blessings of God be upon him – said that whoever embarks upon a path of knowledge, God facilitates for them a path to Paradise.
He does this, scholars say, in two ways. One is worldly, in that he makes it easy for them to do good, and difficult for them to do otherwise. The second is a reference to the afterlife, in that he facilitates for them their crossing of the bridge to Paradise, a task otherwise fraught with difficulty.
There is a general principle when it comes to how reward and punishment is meted out for a specific action; it tends to be commensurate, or similar in kind, to a person’s action, good or bad. This is encapsulated in the maxim: actions are rewarded in kind.
In the case of our knowledge seeker, he has undertaken what is actually an onerous task – knowledge seeking can require, beyond cost, countless hours of attending classes, listening to lectures, recording and reviewing notes, and putting up with teachers with different personalities and teaching methodologies that may not accord with his own.
All of this is near impossible for the intellectually arrogant, as he cannot see why he needs to humiliate himself before knowledge in this manner. But for one who does take it upon himself to traverse this difficult path, they are rewarded in kind, in that God facilitates for them what would have otherwise been an intractable journey.


It has been said that whoever has not tasted the humility of learning for a short time, tastes the bitterness of ignorance for a lifetime. That is, humbling oneself to a sincere knowledge quest can serve to quell many of the pitfalls that come with being intellectually arrogant.
One who does so sincerely will become aware of the kinds of discussions that scholars are engaged in, their range and extent, and the methods they employ to reach their conclusions. A large part of this is because engaging sincerely will provide one with the tools to properly participate in scholarly discussions.
Being apprised of this intellectual heritage protects one from thinking that an entire tradition is undeveloped in that it has little to offer. This awareness also prevents one from viewing the scholarly community with disdain or suspicion, even if one disagrees with their conclusions.
The knowledge that one gains will allow one to develop their intellectual humility in other ways too. At the personal level, it allows one to realize the contours of their own knowledge base; that is, an awareness of what they know and how that roughly fits into the available body of knowledge. For the vast majority of people, this is a humbling experience, as one realizes the limited nature of their grasp, even after years of study.
At a larger level, this humility forces a certain level of tolerance for others’ beliefs and practice, as one no longer pompously believes themselves to have an exclusive grasp of truth in the Islamic tradition. Such a person no longer has the internal urge to object to what others are doing or saying, as he knows that there can be schools of thought or credible scholarship that holds as such. This is why many scholars say: the more one’s knowledge grows, the more his objections diminish.


This is – to finally get to the point – why I think you should be involved in Islamic learning. Aside from the normal reasons for pursuing what is generally considered ‘religious’ knowledge – which are themselves good enough – doing so will allow one to pursue this special knowledge related virtue, that of cultivating intellectual humility.
A community that demonstrates knowledge related virtues, premier among them being a healthy dose of intellectual humility, is the kind of knowledge community we want to build. This is the kind of community that, aside from simply being engaged with knowledge, can build a native tradition of scholarship.
This is because its collective intellectual humility and academic integrity has allowed for the raising of intellectual discourse across the community, beyond the clamor of theories divorced from preceding scholarship and the vague insinuations that often pose as informed comment in popular discourse today.
I want you to be part of this building process, even if in a small way.
It is difficult to approach a knowledge quest sincerely. Yet I encourage you to approach it as sincerely as you can, and pray that your sincerity, even if somehow currently compromised, is perfected over time. Some past scholars used to say, musing on their intentions becoming corrected over time: we started out seeking knowledge for reasons other than God, yet it refused in the end to be for any cause other than God.
The method for participating in this process is up to you; it can and should involve a number of different options. These include attending classes on the ground with those who do embody intellectual humility; taking online courses (such as those offered through Seekershub), listening to lectures, and reading widely.
We don’t lack for resources in learning. We do lack for commitment to learning, a problem that derives largely from arrogance of the intellect.
This is why, in a roundabout way, I think you should involve yourself in sincere Islamic learning.

[cwa id=’cta’]

How To Attain Focus, Patience And Stillness In A Chaotic World

“The scholars sacrifice immediate benefit for long-term benefit,” Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Today, the modern world lives in convenience, expecting to be served, rather than to serve. Although some may argue that convenience and technology save time and reduce physical labor, we continue to complain that we do not have time or energy, reducing ourselves to potatoes sitting on the living room’s couch.

Focus: a salient virtue within Islamic mysticism

Traditionally, focus — a salient virtue within Islamic mysticism — was regarded as a core characteristic of the aspirant, especially among the Sufis. As such, the saints were focused individuals who, despite the calamities they faced, were depicted in the Qur’an as, “Those who are neither fearful nor sad.” In simple words, the saints enjoy the present moment, leaving their past to the will of God and their future to His decree. Hence, the seeker of knowledge is, essentially, a seeker of God, striving, with discipline, practice, and patience to maximize his benefit in every moment while taking the most excellent of ways to do so.

Impatience: Your place is where God has positioned you

Patience is a trait that the seeker should inculcate to facilitate depth in knowledge. In his lexicon on Sufi terminology, Ibn Ajiba defines patience as, “An imprisonment of the heart in submission to God’s command.” Impatience, if understood by the contrary (mafhum al-mukhalafa), would be to release the ego in contradiction to God’s command.
To understand this better, my math teacher, Dr. Yousseif Ismail, once told me that impatience was the desire to cross the current moment that God had willed for you to be in, for a moment that you believed to be better for yourself. In practice, patience is significantly important to the student for a number of reasons.
Firstly, our teachers say, “Your place is where God has positioned you,” suggesting that one should be content with one’s condition, wherever God has decreed him to be. The student of knowledge should recognize that he is a student and must act according to the etiquette of one.

Unstable premises lead to faulty conclusions

As for the second, in order to have depth in knowledge, the student of knowledge should not speak without internalized and externalized foundations that inform his speech, unless a need arises to do so or he is given permission by his teacher(s). The reason given for this is closely related to the he first: a student should not speak in the place of a scholar, fooling the community and inciting his own ego — a celebrity preacher. Unstable premises lead to faulty conclusions; hence, the true aspirant takes the time to ground himself in knowledge, submitting to his current instant, and follows the lead of his teachers throughout.

Prioritise your objectives

To maximize my own time and focus, Shaykh Faraz advised me to have a clear objective of my studies, so I applied the categories of need to my own studies. The scholars divide need into three categories:

  • necessities (dharuriyat)
  • needs (hajiyat)
  • perfections (takmilat)

For example, when considering a new home, you ensure that its foundations are strong, since the house will collapse without solid ground. Then after, you may inspect the ceiling and walls for cracks, because a house is incomplete without these secondary things. After ensuring the house is livable and safe, you might begin to think of ways to beautify your living space with artwork, curtains, rugs, although such adornments are not essential to a house — you can live without them. Similarly, like any profession, one needs to take the proper means to acquire his goals; otherwise, means become ends.
Lastly, in taking steps towards focus, the individual must seek the counsel of God, a metaphysical correspondence to his subjective reality, and the advice of masters, an earthly exchange from experts for an objective assurance (istikhara wa istishara). Thus, remember that you are the present; the future passed a moment ago, but take from those who have passed and know that God is ahead — you are in between the two.
Yousaf Seyal

 Photo by Frida Eyjolfs

Knowledge is the lost property of the believer. Deepen your understanding by taking a short course with SeekersHub.

 

Resources for seekers:

My Mother Does Not Want Me to Read up on Death and Judgement Day – Is It Haram for Me to Disobey Her?

Answered by Ustadha Raidah Shah Idil

Question: My mom doesn’t want me searching up things about Judgement Day and death. Is it haram for me to disobey her and educate myself on the Hereafter, death and Judgement Day?

Answer: Assalamualaykum wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

I pray this finds you well. May Allah reward you for having such sincere concern for your mother.

Obeying parents

No, it is not unlawful for you to disobey her by seeking out this critical knowledge. It is unlawful for you to disrespect or abuse her in the process.

It is important for you, as a Muslimah, to understand these matters which impact on your soul. Be tactful about your research because you know it upsets her i.e. don’t openly advertise what you are studying. Your duty as a daughter is to be kind to her, help her, and be respectful. You do not need to obey her if she calls you to something which will cause you spiritual, emotional or physical harm.

Continue to make dua for your mother.

Rights of parents

When registration re-opens, please enrol in The Rights of Parents to help you better understand the rights of your mother upon you.

May Allah guide you to what is most pleasing to Him.

Please refer to the following link:

Can I Pursue a Career That Goes Against My Parents’ Wishes?

Wassalam,
Raidah

Checked & Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Seeker’s Expectations – How to Seek Knowledge

In the Name of Allah, the Benevolent, the Merciful

Seeker’s Expectations

Assalamu alaikum wa rahmatullah,

Three keys:
(1) Prepare carefully for class
(2) Attend attentively
(3) Review regularly

How to Seek KnowledgeHow to Prepare for the Class
Minimally:
(1) Read the text
(2) Prepare your questions

Ideally:
(1) Do the related readings
(2) Take notes
(3) Note/Look up the verses and hadiths mentioned
(4) Note/Look up definitions of key terms

How to Attend Class
(1) Cut out all distractions
(2) Have high intentions, ask Allah for facilitation
(3) Take careful notes
(4) Ask your questions

How to Seek KnowledgeHow to Review
(1) Have a schedule of review
(2) Have a study partner or group
(3) Review both text and your acting on the text
(4) Follow up questions
(5) Research issues that come up

Strive for Mastery
(1) Acting on what you learn
(2) Know the core material
(3) Know all definitions, key terms, concepts
(4) Be able to teach the text, as you learned it, and answer 90% of likely questions, without having to prepare
(5) Know when to say “I don’t know”

And Allah alone gives success.

Some further reading on Seeking Knowledge:

IslamCast – The Virtues of Seeking Knowledge
Find many more resources on our website but using the search option above.

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Seeking knowledge is one of the surest best ways of drawing closer to Allah, and finding Divine assistance in one’s life & religion. The Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) said, “Whomever Allah wishes well for, He grants deep understanding of religion.” [Bukhari & Muslim]
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The goal of this group is to educate our peers about SeekersHub events through social media. Members are encouraged to share more ideas to get the word out with everyone else in the group.
“Whoever points to the good has the reward of those who act on it,” said the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace).
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Our course are free due to ”Knowledge Without Barriers”. This is an expression of our commitment to spread the light of Prophetic guidance as far & wide as we can–without barriers. Knowledge without Barriers is a direct response to the contemporary challenge Muslims are facing globally regarding access to authoritative and sound knowledge in Sacred Sciences.
With SeekersHub you can learn directly from quality teachers, who are highly qualified.
Teachers such as Ustadh Abdul Latif Al-Amin who has been nurtured by SeekersHub from student to teacher. We also have some excellent up and coming scholars who will, God-willing, be the leaders of the future.
Which Courses Should You Take?
All our courses focus on topics that are “beneficial knowledge,” but we would recommend:
1. If you’re starting on the path of knowledge I suggest:
The Absolute Essentials: Beliefs, Prayer, and Spirituality
Taught by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani & Ustadh Abdullah Misra
The 40 Foundations of Religion (by Imam Ghazali): Excellence in Faith and Actions
Taught by Shaykh Faraz A. Khan
2. If you want to learn about life of the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace), and to acquire Prophetic character & conduct:
Meccan Dawn: The Life of the Beloved Prophet Muhammad
Taught by Ustadh Abdullah Misra
Prophetic Conduct: Islamic Manners in Everyday Life
Taught by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani & Ustadh Abdul Latif Al-Amin
Gardens of the Righteous: the Sunnah of the Sunnah
Taught by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani & Ustadh Abdul Latif Al-Amin
3. If you are a seeker of knowledge:
SeekersSteps: We highly recommend that you join the SeekersSteps Curriculum if you want a clear path towards learning. We currently offer three courses in the curriculum, which should be taken in order at your own pace for maximum benefit. Please see the website for more information on this groundbreaking initiative.
4. If you are seeking spiritual guidance and to improve your relationship with Allah:
The Marvels of the Heart
Taught by Shaykh Yahya Rhodus
5. For clarity on key life concerns:
Islamic Parenting: Raising Upright Children
Taught by Faraz Rabbani and Ustadha Shireen Ahmed
Money Matters: Islamic Finance in Everyday Life
Taught by Faraz Rabbani
… and more. See the full list of courses at courses.seekershub.org and join other keen seekers on the path of knowledge guidance.