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What Islamic Perspective is Taught at SeekersGuidance?

Answered by Ustadh Salman Younas

Question: Are the courses at SeekersGuidance, such as the beliefs course Kharida al-Bahiyya and others, representative of Sunni Islam? Also, could you explain what is meant by Sunni Islam?

Answer: wa `alaykum assalam

The courses at SeekersHub and the texts taught in these courses are based on the orthodox Sunni tradition (Ahl al-Sunna). This is a tradition accepted and followed by the vast majority of Muslim scholars and laity from the time of the Companions (Allah be well pleased with them) up to our own times.

Thus, the Kharida al-Bahiyya, which is the text we are reading for this class, was written by Imam Dardir, who was considered one of the greatest scholars of the Maliki school of his time, an expert in the field of Islamic belief, as well as an accomplished spiritual master.

Understanding Sunni Orthodoxy

The best way to understand the tradition of Ahl al-Sunna is through the hadith of Gibril (Allah bless him), narrated by Abu Hurayra (Allah be well pleased with him) as follows:

“One day while the Prophet was sitting in the company of some people, (The angel) Gabriel came and asked, ‘What is faith (iman)?’ Allah’s Apostle replied, ‘Faith is to believe in Allah, His angels, (the) meeting with Him, His Apostles, and to believe in Resurrection.’ Then he further asked, ‘What is submission (islam)?’ Allah’s Apostle replied, ‘To worship Allah Alone and none else, to offer prayers perfectly to pay the compulsory charity (Zakat) and to observe fasts during the month of Ramadan.’ Then he further asked, ‘What is Ihsan (perfection)?’ Allah’s Apostle replied, ‘to worship Allah as if you see Him, and if you cannot see Him, then be sure that He is seeing you.'” [Bukhari, Muslim]

This narration sums up the orthodox and accepted tradition of Islam, which is divided into three main sub-categories:

a. Faith (iman), namely what we need to believe, discussed under the science of Islamic belief (`aqida),

b. Submission (islam), namely the ritual practices we need to perform, discussed under the science of Islamic Law (fiqh), and

c. Perfecting our belief and worship (ihsan), namely spirituality and purification of the self, discussed under the science of tasawwuf, tazkiyya, or, as you refer to it, Sufism.

Together, these three formulate the “religion” (din) as a whole and so none of them should be neglected.

The Sciences & Relying on Authority

Each of these three sciences, namely belief (`aqida), law (fiqh), and spirituality (tasawwuf/tazkiyya), have been well-defined, developed, and transmitted by thousands of scholars for the past 1400 years, from the very time of the Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) up to our own times.

Our duty is to recognize this scholarly way and benefit from it, following the command of Allah to “ask those who know if you know not.” (16:43)

Thus, when it comes to Islamic belief (`aqida), we have the Ash`ari and Maturidi schools. Both helped define the contents of faith, the proof for it, and defended it from those who sought to undermine it.

Likewise, when it comes to Islamic law (fiqh), we have the four schools (madhabs): the Hanafi, Shafi`i, Maliki, and Hanbali schools. Each of these legal schools have a long, nuanced tradition of dealing with aspects of Islamic practice like prayer, fasting, Zakat, and Hajj, and have been accepted as the standard of this science for centuries.

Similarly, when it comes to Islamic spirituality (tasawwuf), we have the spiritual masters who are trained in identifying and fixing the ailments of the self (nafs), purifying the heart, and making one’s worship sincere. This is the reality of Sufism.

The authoritative figures of each of the sciences can be found in every generation including our own. As a living tradition, there is no era where experts in each of these fields do not exist, guiding people, answering questions, coming up with answers to new problems, and spreading the light of this religion.

Focus & Aim

Thus, we strive to follow the hadith of Gibril (Allah bless him) and teach our courses with a focus on all three of the main categories mentioned in this noble narration without neglecting any one of them. This is the way of balance and the way the scholars of this religion tread throughout the past.

Thus, you will find that we teach courses covering all of these science, such as law, belief, hadith, and spirituality. In doing so, we teach from the most authoritative and widely-accepted texts in each field and recognize the importance of constantly going back to this long accepted tradition of scholarship that has its roots in the very earliest generations of Muslims, namely the Companions (Allah be well pleased with them).

I hope that answers your questions. Please do not hesitate to post a follow-up.

I would also advise reading the following:

The Asharis & Maturidis – Standards of Mainstream Sunni Beliefs

A Reader on Following Schools of Thought (Madhabs)

Excellent lecture by Shaykh Faraz

Salman

Recommended Class:

Islamic Beliefs for Seekers: Dardir’s Kharidah Explained

The Bani ‘Alawi: Background, Key Figures and the Spiritual Path – Treasures for the Seeker Blog

The Bani ‘Alawi: Background, Key Figures and the Spiritual Path – Treasures for the Seeker Blog

بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

اللهم صل وسلم على رسولك وآله أجمعين

as-salamu alaykum wa rahmatullah,

We are blessed to have been given access to a recording of a course conducted by al-Habib Kazim as-Saqqaf, in which the essential principles of the Ba ‘Alawi way were outlined and explained, in addition to brief biographies of its key figures. We ask Allah to make this of benefit for those seeking an introduction to the path in English.

Teacheral-Habib Kazim as-Saqqaf

Translated byUstadh Ibrahim Osi-Efa

TextThe way of Bani ‘Alawi – al-Imam ‘Abdu Llah b. ‘Alawi al-’Attas

Part 1: The House of Prophecy: The Background

Part 2: The Methodology – Manhaj

Part 3: The Path – Tariqah

Part 4: The Spiritual Poles: Key Figures

Part 5: Questions and Answers

Part 6: Closing Dua

Alternatively, one is able to download the 6 parts combined as a ZIP file from here.

Please keep those involved in the process of allowing the recording to reach us in your prayers.

Sikhism and Interfaith Marriage

Answered by Ustadh Abdullah Anik Misra

Question: I am from India, Sikh by birth and I seek knowledge regarding the Islamic views on few aspects.

1) Sikhism, as you must be aware, is a strictly monotheistic religion, like Islam.  I am keen to inquire about how Islam views Sikhs from Day Of Judgement.

2) If Islam allows a Muslims girl to chose a husband of her own, shouldn’t she be allowed to chose someone who may be a non-Muslim? And why is this given more importance than lying? And considering Sikhs also believe in One-God, shouldn’t they be a suitable matrimonial partner?

3) If a boy is very good in nature  and doesn’t hurt anyone but is not a Muslim by birth or religion, should a Muslim girl’s family reject him just because he is not a Muslim? If he has the best value-system, does belief in God matter?

Answer: In the Name of God, the Most Merciful and Compassionate,

Dear brother,

Thank you for your email.  Your questions show that you are open-minded and respectful.  I believe that no one asks a sincere question regarding the ultimate Truths and eternal verities, except that they are being guided by God to something higher and greater and better for them.  So in His Name, I begin:

Sikhism and Islam

It is true that Sikhism is a monotheistic religion, just like Islam.  In fact, Sikhism was influenced in a significant way in its early development by Islam, particularly through the field of Islamic spirituality (Sufism) and the teachings of certain Muslim mystic-saints (sufis), whose writings were later included into the Sikh holy book, the Adi Granth.

The beliefs of the early Muslim mystics who left their indelible mark on Sikhism were clear: that there is no god except the one true God, and that the Prophet Muhammad was His final messenger and servant, peace be upon him, after a long line of prophets revered also by the Jewish and Christian faiths.  Whoever sincerely desires the truth of monotheism in its purest and most authentic expression then, should at least explore what this means, and what the Prophet’s message was.

The crux of the matter therefore, is not simply claiming monotheism, but actualizing that claim to monotheism.  What monotheism entails from us is that we worship God the way He desires to be worshiped, according to the guidance that He sent to us through His messengers, of which Muhammad was the last, peace be upon him and all the prophets.

The message of Islamic monotheism is the one valid, saving message on the Day of Judgment for all of humanity.  Those who never had a chance to fairly understand this divine truth in their lifetime will not be judged by its standards on that Day, but those who did have the chance, and realized its veracity deep down inside, will be asked on that day how they responded to God’s guidance in their lifetime.  It’s up to the individual to earnestly seek God and accept the truth where it is revealed to him.

Interfaith Marriage

While a Muslim, man or woman, has the right to choose who they marry, the pool of who they can choose from is based upon what God has allowed.  A Muslim woman can only marry a man who prays to one Lord in the same way she does, and who encourages and enables her to live a spiritually-fulfilling life in Islam, with all the rights and respect it affords her, ideally speaking.  This requires that he be a Muslim, so that she finds a partner to live her faith with, and so that their future offspring can also be born and raised as Muslims who lovingly follow God’s way.

Every virtue has its proper place.  Not lying, for example, is better and more important than being a good driver, but when one is on the highway, driving safely takes precedence over not lying since a greater interest (life) is being protected as a priority.  In the same way, all good virtues in a spouse are important, but if correct faith is missing, this threatens the spiritual life and afterlife of the other spouse, and so this becomes a priority to preserve.

As we said above, while both religions are monotheistic, the next litmus test is to ask whether one believes in the finality of prophethood and the verity of the final message of God in the form of Islam.  If the answer is in the positive, one is suitable to marry a Muslim woman.  If not, then not.

You must remember that these conditions are not made-up by religious clergy nor in the hands of men- rather, this is God’s command to us.  Hence, if one claims to be monotheist, how can one sincerely claim this and not ask oneself what God wants from them?

Thus, rather than questioning the wisdom behind certain rulings that may be preventing us from doing what we want to do, we should open our hearts and ask God what He wants us to do then follow that, as, obviously, what He wants will have the greatest wisdom, will it not?

Faith Matters, So Give Truth a Chance

Correct belief in God matters, as it is the highest virtue.  This is the purest reflection of the highest ideal: Truth.  It is only through God that all other virtues are known to man.  Thus, the closer we get to understanding God and worshiping Him the way He wishes, the more we understand what virtues we should adorn ourselves with.  One can be very moral and courteous, but without loving God and doing what He loves, we have a huge gap in our moral system and our values are deficient, without knowing it.

Thus, it is valid for a Muslim girl’s family to demand that a suitor follows that highest virtue of true faith.  If a man truly loves a Muslim woman, then he owes it to her- and moreover, to the One who created her –  to give an unbiased, sincere look at her religion, and ask God whether it is the true way, or not.

I am not trying to preach or cast rules upon you because I don’t know what you are going through, but rather because I was once in your position over a decade ago, and I was faced with this opportunity to search for the truth, and I asked God to guide me, and then He guided me to the truth of Islam through His love and mercy upon me.  I have not regretted or looked back since then.  By finding God, I gained everything I truly wanted and more than I had ever asked for in both my worldly and spiritual life, including my family and the most peaceful and satisfying way of life.  And you can have that too.

If you have any other questions, I am ever at your service.

Your brother,

Abdullah Anik Misra

Checked & Approved by Faraz Rabbani

On Reflection (fikr) – Imam al-Haddad (Book of Assistance)

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On Reflection (fikr)

Glowing Mosque

from: The Book of Assistance, Imam ‘Abdallah Ibn ‘Alawi al-Haddad (Allah have mercy upon him)

Translated by: Dr. Mostafa al-Badawi, Madina

 

You should have a wird of reflection in every twenty-four hours, for which you should set aside one or more hours. The best time for reflection is the one in which are the least pre-occupations, worries, and more potential for the heart to be present, such as the depths of the night. Know that the state of one’s religious and worldly affairs depend upon soundness of one’s reflection.

Anyone who has a share of it has an abundant share of everything good. It has been said : ‘An hour’s reflection is better than a year’s worship.’ ‘Ali, may God ennoble his face, has said: ‘There is no worship like reflection.’ And one of the gnostics; may God have mercy on them all, said: ‘Reflection is the lamp of the heart; if it departs the heart will have no light.’

 

 

The ways of reflection are many.

One, which is the most noble of them, is to reflect on the wonders of God’s dazzling creation, the inward and outward signs of His Ability, and the signs He has scattered abroad in the Realm of the earth and the heavens. This kind of reflection increases your knowledge of the Essence,

Full moon over the sea

Attributes, and Names of God. He has encouraged it by saying:Say: Look at what is in the heavens and the earth! (10:101)

Reflect on the wondrous creations He has made, and on yourself. He has said: In the earth are signs for those who have certainty, and in yourselves; can you not see? (51:20-21)

 

Know that you must reflect on the favors of God, and His bounties which He caused to reach you.

Remember the favors of God, that you may succeed. (7:69)

Should you (attempt to) number the favors of God, you would not be able to do so. (16:18)

All good things that you possess are from God. (16:53)

This kind of reflection results in the heart filling with the love of God, and continuously rendering thanks to Him, inwardly and outwardly, in a manner that pleases and satisfies Him.

Know that you should reflect on God’s complete awareness of you, and His seeing and knowing all about you.

We have created man, and We know what his soul whispers to him; and We are nearer to him than his jugular vein. (50:16)

And He is with you wherever you are, and God sees what you do. (57:4)

Have you not seen that God knows what is in the heavens and the earth, and no three (persons) converse but that He is their fourth?(58:7)

This kind of reflection results in your feeling ashamed before God should He see you where He has forbidden you to be, or miss you where He has commanded you to be.

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Know that you must reflect on your shortcomings in worshipping your Lord, and your exposing yourself to His wrath should you do what He has forbidden you.

I created jinn and men only to worship Me. (51:56)

Do you think We created you in vain, and that to Us you will not be returned? (23:115)

O man! What is it that has deceived you concerning your Generous Lord? (82:6)

This kind of reflection increases your fear of God, encourages you to blame and reproach yourself, to avoid remissness and persevere in your zeal.

Know that you must reflect on this worldly life, its numerous preoccupations, hazards, and the swiftness with which it perishes, and upon the hereafter, and its felicity and permanence.

Thus does God render the signs clear to you, that you may reflect on this world and the hereafter. (2:119-220)

But you may prefer the life of this world, when the hereafter is better and more abiding. (87:16-17)

The life of the world is but distraction and play; while the Last Abode is indeed the Life, if but they knew. (29:64)

This kind of reflection results in losing all desire for the world, and in wishing for the hereafter.

Know that you should reflect on the imminence of death and the regret and remorse which occur when it is too late.

Say: The death that you flee will indeed meet you, and you will then be returned to the Knower of the unseen and the seen, and He will inform you of that which you had been doing.(62:8)

Until, when death comes to one of them he says: ‘My Lord! Send me back that I may do good in that which I have left!’ No! It is but a word he says. (23:99-100)

O you who believe! Let not your wealth or your children distract you from the remembrance of God! up to: But God will not reprieve a soul whose time has come. (63:9-11)

The benefit of this kind of reflection is that hopes become short, behavior better, and provision is gathered for the Appointed Day.

Know that you should reflect on those attributes and acts by which God has described His friends and His enemies, and on the immediate and delayed rewards which He has prepared for each group.

The righteous are in felicity, and the depraved are in hell.(82:13-14)

Is the one who is a believer like the one who is corrupt? They are not equal. (32:18)

As for the one who gave, had taqwa, and believed in goodness, We shall ease him into ease, (92:5-7)up to the end of the sura.

The believers are those who, when God is mentioned, their hearts tremble, up to: they will have degrees with their Lord, and forgiveness, and generous provision. (8:2-4)

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God has promised those among you who have believed and done good works that He will make them rulers over the earth as He made those before them rulers. (24:55)

Each we took for their sin; on some we sent a hurricane, some were taken by the Cry, some We caused the earth to swallow, and some We drowned. It was not for God to wrong them, but they wronged themselves. (29:40)

Hypocrite men and hypocrite women proceed one from another; they enjoin evil and forbid good, up to: God curses them, and theirs is a lasting torment.(9:67- 68)

Believing men and believing women are helping friends to each other; they enjoin good and forbid evil. up to: and good pleasure from God which is greater; that is the supreme gain. (9:71-72)

Those who do not expect to meet Us, are content with the life of the world and feel secure therein, up to: and the end of their prayer is, Praised be God, the Lord of the Worlds! (10:7-10)

The result of this kind of reflection is that you come to love the fortunate, habituate yourself to emulating their behavior and taking on their qualities, and detest the wretched, and habituate yourself to avoiding their behavior and traits of character.

Were we to allow ourselves to pursue the various channels of reflection we would have to forgo the brevity which we intended. That which we have mentioned should suffice the man of reason.

You should with each kind of reflection, bring to mind those verses, hadiths and other narratives relating to it. We have given an example of this by quoting some of the verses related to each kind of reflection.

Beware of reflecting on the Essence of God and His Attributes in the wish to understand their nature and how they exist. No one ever became enamoured of this without falling into the abysses of negation (ta’til) or the traps of anthropomorphism (tashbih). The Messenger of God, may blessings and peace be upon him, has said: ‘Reflect on the signs of God, and do not reflect on His Essence, for you will never be able to give Him His due.’

Source: Imam Abdallah Ibn Alawi al-Haddad, The Book of Assistance, translated by Dr. Mostafa al-Badawi.

Book of Assistance

There are many books in English which present Sufi doctrine, but few which can be used as practical travel guides along the Path. Originally written in Classical Arabic, the aptly-named Book of Assistance is today in widespread use among Sufi teachers in Arabia, Indone

 

sia and East Africa. Presented here in the readable translation of Dr. Badawi, this manual of devotions, prayers and practical ethics will be invaluable to all who love the Prophet and the Sufi way.

The author Imam Abdallah Ibn-Alawi Al-Haddad (d. 1720), lived at Tarim in the Hadramaut valley between Yemen and Oman, and is widely held to have been the ?renewer? of the twelfth Islamic century. A direct descendant of the Prophet, his sanctity and direct experience of God are clearly reflected in his writings, which include several books, a collection of Sufi letters, and a volume of mystical poetry. He spent most of his life in Kenya and Saudi Arabia where he taught Islamic jurisprudence and classical Sufism according to the order (tariqa) of the Ba’Alawi sayids.

What is Sufism? (tasawwuf)

Answered by Shaykh Gibril Haddad

Al-Hamdu lillah was-Salat was-Salam
`ala Rasulillah wa Alihi wa Sahbihi wa man Walah

“Before asking what is Sufism, we should ask what is Religion.”
(Shaykh Nazim in an interview with the BBC, London 1991)

Shaykh al-`Arusi said in his marginalia
titled Nata’ij al-Afkar al-Qudsiyya (Bulaq, 1920/1873):

“Religion (al-dîn) is an orchard of which the fence is the Law (al-sharî`a), the inner grove is the Path (al-tarîqa), and the fruit is the Reality (al-haqîqa). Whoever has no Law has no Religion; whoever has no Path has no Law; and whoever has no Reality has no Path … ”

“The way of the Sufis consists in ten items:

(1) The reality of tasawwuf which is defined by truthful self-orientation (sidq al-tawajjuh) to Allah Most High.

(2) The pivot of truthful tawajjuh is to single out the heart and the body for [obedience of] Allah Alone.

(3) Tasawwuf in relation to Dîn is like the soul in relation to the body.

(4) The Sufi examines the factors of perfection and deficiency.

(5) The Jurist examines whatever discharges liability (mâ yusqitu al-haraj) while the scholar of juridical/doctrinal Principles (al-usûlî) examines whatever makes one’s faith valid and firmly established. Therefore the Sufi’s perspective is more specific than both of theirs, consequently their criticism of him is valid, while his criticism of either of them is invalid. Hence ‘the Sufi among Jurists is better than the Jurist among Sufis.’

(6) To display the nobility of tasawwuf, its evidence being both by demonstration and by textual precedent (burhânan wa nassan).

(7) Fiqh [jurisprudence] is the precondition for the validity of tasawwuf and that is why it has precedence over it.

(8) Terminology and its specific applicability to each discipline exclusively of others.

(9) The keys of spiritual opening concerning which there are four rulings: first principles; truthful aspiration towards attainment; longing for spiritual realities; and quitting the guideline of what is transmitted (al-manqûl) once one obtains self-realization (al-tahqîq).

(10) It is a wonderful and strange path built on the permanent following of what is better and best: in doctrines it consists in following the Salaf; in rulings, fiqh; in meritorious deeds (al-fada’il), the scholars of hadith; and in high manners (al-âdâb), all that is conducive to the wholeness of hearts.”

Some definitions of tasawwuf:

Tasawwuf: Purification of the self from all that is other than the remembrance and obedience of Allah; the realization of ihsân (excellence); zuhd (asceticism) combined with ma`rifa (knowledge of Allah); the attribute of the Sufi. “Ceasing objection” (al-Su`luki); “Abandoning the world and its people” (Ibn Sam`un). “Tasawwuf is neither knowledge nor deeds but an attribute with which the essence of the Sufi adorns itself, possessing knowledge and deeds, and consisting in the balance in which these two are weighed.” (Ibn Khafif)

Some definitions of the Sufi:

Sûfî, pl. Sûfiyya: One who follows the path of tasawwuf, “He who gazes at the Real in proportion to the state in which He maintains him” (Bundar). They wore wool (sûf): “I found the redress of my heart between Makka and Madina with a group of strangers ­ people of wool and cloaks” (ashâb sûf wa `abâ‘). Sufyan al-Thawri as cited from Khalaf ibn Tamim by al-Dhahabi, Siyar A`lam al-Nubala’ (Dar al-Fikr ed. 7:203).

Hajj Gibril

GF Haddad ©
[2000-09-29]

Sea Without Shore: A Manual of the Sufi Path – Shaykh Nuh Keller – Now Available – SunnaBooks

Sea Without Shore | SunnaBooks

 

 

You can order the book online directly from FirdousBooks.com:
http://www.firdousbooks.com/store/without-shore-p-732.html

Sea Without Shore is a practical manual for those travelling the path of Sufism or Islamic mysticism, which strives, in Junayd’s words, ‘to separate the Beginninglessly Eternal from that which originates in time,’ in a word, to be with the Divine without any relation. The book opens with narratives of five Sufis met by the author in Syria, Jordan, and Turkey whose lives exemplified the knowledge and practice of the Sufi path.

The second part is a complete handbook of the method and rule of the Shadhili order of Sufism, transmitted to the author by his spiritual mentor, Sheikh ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Shaghouri—from devotions, dhikr or ‘invocation,’ and metaphysical doctrine, to how a Sufi lives, marries, and earns a living in the modern world.

A third part treats wider theological questions such as other faiths and mysticisms, universalism and the finality of Islam, the promise of God to Jews and Christians, evolution and religion, and divine Wisdom and Justice in the face of human suffering.

The book provides an indelible portrait of a vibrant mystical tradition spanning seven and a half centuries of endeavor to know the Divine face-to-face.

The Summons of the Divine Presence extends across time and place through all heaven-sent revelations. At the core of every heart it reaches it creates a desire to lift the veil between the human and the Divine, not merely to believe and worship and practice, but to see, know, and be with the One who is greater than all. Sufism is a way of worship of the Divine through such direct knowledge, in the Prophetic phrase, ‘as though you see Him.’

Sea Without Shore describes five remarkable men the author met and knew in his own Sufi path, and what he heard and learned from them first hand while living in the Near East over several decades. It is a Sufi manual taken from hearts, because God looks at them first, and they matter to the work of the Sufis more than books or literature. It offers a window upon a living tradition of experiential knowledge of the highest Reality. It is a handbook as valuable for its inside view of a centuries-old Islamic mystical order, as for its solution to the greatest mysteries at the heart of human existence: you, God, and your fate beyond the grave.

About the Author

NUH HA MIM KELLER was born in the northwestern United States in 1954. He read philosophy and classical Arabic at the University of Chicago and UCLA, and became a Muslim in Cairo in 1977. He was a disciple in the Shadhili order of the Sufi master and poet Sheikh ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Shaghouri of Damascus from 1982 until the latter’s death in 2004, and was authorized as a sheikh in the order by Sheikh ‘Abd al-Rahman in 1996. He has studied Shafi‘i and Hanafi jurisprudence, hadith, and other subjects with traditional scholars in the Middle East, and in the 1980s, under the tutelage of Islamic scholars in Syria and Jordan, produced Reliance of the Traveller, the first translation of a standard Islamic legal reference in a European language to be certified by al-Azhar, the Muslim world’s oldest institution of higher learning. Among his other works and translations are Becoming Muslim, Sufism in Islam, al-Maqasid: Imam Nawawi’s Manual of Islam, Invocations of the Shadhili Order, Port in a Storm: A Fiqh Solution to the Qibla of North America, and an illuminated calligraphic edition of Dala‘il al-Khayrat. He has travelled and lectured on Islam extensively, and he writes and teaches in Amman, where he has lived since 1980.”

 

You can order Sea Without Shore online directly from FirdousBooks.com:
http://www.firdousbooks.com/store/without-shore-p-732.html