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Is It Licit to Go to a Snooker Lounge That Doesn’t Have Gambling and Betting?

Answered by Ustadha Shazia Ahmad

Question: Is it halal to go to a snooker lounge that doesn’t have gambling and betting?

Answer: Assalamu alaykum,

Thank you for this excellent question. Playing snooker, also known as pool or billiards is permissible in the type of lounge that you mention. Although it isn’t prohibited, I must mention some detail.

Wasting time has become far too common among our youth and boys. They don’t perceive that the reason for the absence of blessings (barakah) in our lives as a nation (ummah) is because of how much time is wasted. The Prophet, may Allah bless him and give him peace, said, “Take advantage of five matters before five other matters: your youth before you become old; your health, before you fall sick; your wealth, before you become poor; your free time before you become preoccupied, and your life, before your death.” [Musnad Imam Ahmad]

This hadith is sufficient to indicate to us that our days and nights are meant to be valued as precious. Our youth should be pre-occupied with learning obligatory and beneficial knowledge, serving the poor, elders, and the needy, seeking to build skills to acquire halal provision, seeking to strengthen one’s body with fresh air and exercise. Building relationships with neighbors and family and not forgetting one’s duties are of utmost importance.

The lifestyle that comes along with snooker lounges is not appropriate for a person who spends his day thinking it could be his last. A Muslim may not enter into an activity that might cause him to miss a prayer, neglect his duties at home, ignore his children and forget about their upbringing, fall short in helping his parents, etc. Ponder this last hadith and I leave the decision up to you. Please see the related links for clarification on wasting time.

The Prophet, may Allah bless him and give him peace, said, “The feet of a servant will not touch the ground until he is asked about his life and how he spent it; his knowledge and how he acted upon it; his wealth and how he acquired it and spent it and his body and how it was used.” [Tirmidhi]

Do make time for leisure, but with the right intention. Have a picnic with your family, connect with friends for sport, food, worship, or other quality time. Fill your time with beneficial activities and service, you will see the blessings rain down, near and far in sha Allah.

The Blameworthy Trait Of Wasting One’s Time and Its Cure

On Using Time Appropriately

[Ustadha] Shazia Ahmad

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadha Shazia Ahmad lived in Damascus, Syria for two years where she studied aqidah, fiqh, tajweed, tafseer and Arabic. She then attended the University of Texas at Austin, where she completed her Masters in Arabic. Afterwards, she moved to Amman, Jordan where she studied fiqh, Arabic and other sciences. She recently moved back to Mississauga, Canada, where she lives with her family.

Islamic Time Management During COVID-19 – Sidi Tushar Imdad

With curfew measures and stay-at-home orders in place across the world, most of us find ourselves cooped up at home for much longer than we are used to.

Worse still, trying to work or study with multiple family members competing for space and time is a recipe for distraction!

Politicians liken the fight with Coronavirus to a war – it’s like a battle humanity must win.

Productivity experts like to use the same analogy for time management. You are battling with your life, your week or your day.

Islamically, we have an even better model (because it’s true!). Spiritual masters have described our real battle to be with four: our nafs (selfish ego), our hawa (obsessional tendencies or ‘stubborn, wilful folly’), Shaytan (we all know him!) and the Dunya (defined by Imam al-Ghazali as anything that distracts one from Allah).

Whichever model you look at, the point is the same. If we do not actively battle with the enemies of our time, then we will lose.

Remember what Imam Shafi’i (r.a.) learned from the Sufis:

“Time is like a sword; if you don’t cut it, it will cut you!”
 
What does any military leader do before any battle?

PLAN.

Preparation is EVERYTHING. If there’s just one time management habit you get from all my articles, I hope it is this: plan your weeks and plan your days .

(If you want a deeper dive into the basics of planning, goal setting and other time managements tricks, you could look into my self-study course Time Tactics 101: https://tusharimdad.thinkific.com/courses/time-tactics-101. Before you buy, email me for a massive discount)

If you don’t plan, this is what happens:

You’re right in the middle of an essential task and your son comes in the room to ask for something.

You’re trying to concentrate but the sound from the kids is driving you nuts!

You are about to finally finish that complex report when your spouse reminds you that you promised to get lunch ready.

It’s like waking up late and spending the whole day fighting fires.

(I contrast a well-planned day with a distracted, ineffective one in a previous article: https://seekersguidance.org/articles/featured-articles/islamic-time-management-series-power-your-day-with-pre-planning-sidi-tushar-imdad/).

Imagine moving city, or starting a new job. Wouldn’t there be so much research and prep you’d do? The unprecedented situation we find ourselves in is no less dramatic – indeed, for many of us, it’s even more disruptive.

The more disrupted your life is, the more you need to plan for it.

So HOW do you optimize your time at home to ensure continued productivity at home.

Below I share 10 pro tips, all of which I practise myself:

1. Sit with your spouse and plan your week.
If you want to be a ‘super couple’ I recommend you do this every week, but for now we ALL need to be doing this. Since you’re both working under the same roof and kids are home, you need to thrash out the following:

  1. Who will home-school/ monitor the kids and when?
  2. Who and when will shop online or locally
  3. Agree meal times, start of work times, end of work times

2. Define and agree clear work times.
You will argue. You will get stressed. It’s all normal and all part of the process. Arguments always happen when expectations are not met. So you need to COMMUNICATE and AGREE what your expectations are for work time and family time. If you are the husband, you need to make sure your family understands when you are unavailable. If you are the wife, you must communicate and discuss any help you need from your husband BEFORE he gets absorbed in his work. Nothing starts an argument like being interrupted from an important task and being asked to help with something not agreed to before!

3. Set up a defined work area.
Hopefully, you have a study or a room which you can designate as your makeshift ‘office’. Even if it’s a bedroom, that’s fine for now. Just ensure your family know that between work hours you are unavailable.

4. Put up a sign.
My coach has us print ‘Do not disturb’ signs and stick them on the door when we are embarking on ‘deep work’. Some office workers will even stick such a sheet on their backs . The point is to communicate deadly seriousness that your work time is sacred. Because it is.

5. Share breakfast or lunch with family.
To make strategy 4 more palatable for your family, give back by being really present for a family meal – either breakfast or lunch. You’d normally be eating alone or at the office. Take advantage of the curfew by enjoying a bonus 30 minutes purely with your family. If you do this with presence, your family will be more than happy enough to then let you work intensively later.

6. Set an alarm for all your salahs.
It’s surprisingly easy to get into bad habits with salah when working from home. Your whole routine has changed and the usual cues – including the chance to pray in the masjid – are gone. You can read my brief LinkedIn post about this point here:
https://www.linkedin.com/posts/tushar-imdad-0a466b13_islamictimemanagement-productivitytips-timemanagement-activity-6648563223773745152-Yo0x

7. Keep to clear boundaries.
As my wife has reminded me on many of the occasions when I’ve slipped up on this point, there’s nothing more frustrating for your family than when you keep working past your agreed end time. If you decide and agree that you will finish at 6, then stop at 6. You’ve given your word. Stick to it. Go and be with your family for Allah’s sake.

When you keep working past your set boundaries, it communicates indifference and disrespect to your family. Your kids and your spouse see that you value your work more than them. Don’t let this happen – especially in these fearful times – when they need you to lead and guide them most.

8 .Go for a morning walk.
I won’t hyperlink again, but I’ve written before about the power of a morning walk. In countries like the UK, we are restricted to just one session of outdoor exercise outside. Ironically, this may help families exercise MORE than before! Make it an unmoveable part of your schedule to go on a 10-30 minute morning walk. If you can bring family with you, then you kill two birds with one stone! A brisk, morning walk can bring wonders to your energy, mood and sleep. Don’t miss it.

9. Schedule time for Islamic gatherings or learning LIVE.
One of the hardest aspects of the current pandemic is our isolation from each other. When in our lives have we ever been prevented from attending the masjid? As such, it is vital we replace this with the best, possible substitute: online halaqas or lectures or lessons where Islamic knowledge is being imparted and pious ‘ulema are present. Try to attend live as there is much more barakah in live sessions. Seekersguidance.org have a whole range of quality courses from absolute beginner to those proficient in Arabic – all completely FREE. Aim for at least one weekly majlis that you attend.

Aside from the social and spiritual benefits from this, spending time with those beloved to Allah palpably helps your mindset. It’s a soothing antidote to all the fear and negativity from news and social media.

10. Calendarize and timetable all the above.
I can’t emphasize this enough. You must schedule all the above in writing, or on your app. Once you write it down in your calendar, it becomes concrete. It becomes a commitment. So many good intentions float away as they simply weren’t tied down to a written plan.

Try implementing these 10 steps methodically and you’ll experience a profound sense of control and order in the midst of turbulence.

As we enter Sha’ban, our minds will start preparing for Ramadan. Allah has blessed us with a whole month to get to grips with the new unexpected lifestyle changes brought on by Covid-19. One of the best things you can do in this month is to get organized, start mastering your schedule and live optimally as possible.

That way, when Ramadan arrives, you’ll be ready to hit the ground running.

Praying for barakah and taufeeq in your time,

Tushar Imdad 

P.S. I run an Islamic-oriented online homeschool academy, specialising in quality English teaching suitable to support any Western curriculum. We are due to expand to meet the new demand caused by school closures and also add science and maths to the programme. If you are interested in learning more, please complete this short survey so I can understand your needs: https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/VHFF356

If you enjoyed this article, you can sign up to Tushar’s mailing list for his weekly Jum’a articles, free content about Islamic Time Management as well as updates for exciting courses or services: https://mailchi.mp/5879bd7982eb/tusharimdad


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  
 A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   
Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in  productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included  ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.

Masterclass Course Announcement – Tushar Imdad

As-salamu ‘alaikum

First of all, thank you for all the interest in my articles these last few months. It has been a true honour to have so many of you subscribe to my mailing list.

I am so happy to finally announce the first training of 2020.

My professional courses are corporate in quality, typically lasting 6-8 weeks and normally costing between $150-500.

However, I wanted to deliver something much shorter – and cheaper – but still of extremely high value that would be relevant to the many new readers from the SeekersGuidance community.

So I’ve prepared a masterclass requiring only 2 hours of your time, and costing no more than a meal out at a restaurant.

For this training, I draw upon some of the finest tools I have personally implemented and taught over the last 10 years, to show you how to reset the Qibla of your life and ensure all key priority areas – your work, your worship, your family life, your self-development – are aligned with Allah’s good pleasure.

https://event.webinarjam.com/register/vy376hv

Like all training I deliver, it will be immensely practical. You will see a difference within a week. And the tools I teach can profoundly impact your life week after week.

Click the link below for more details and to register. Can’t wait to meet you on Sunday 16th Feb inshaAllah:

https://event.webinarjam.com/register/vy376hv

Was-salam
Tushar Imdad


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  
 A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   
Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in  productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included  ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.


Islamic Time Management Series: Power Your Day with Pre-Planning – Sidi Tushar Imdad

If I lost my memory and could only remember ONE productivity technique from the many learned over the years, then do you know which I’d choose?

PRE-PLANNING.

Out of the thousands of pounds invested in the last few years and the dozens of time management books I’ve experimented with, the practice of pre-planning is undoubtedly what separates me and my top clients from the rest.

But here’s the thing. Even though pre-planning is so simple, most people fail to even plan their days.

We often just work on auto-pilot, by habit. And most of these habits are not necessarily helpful.

LIVE YOUR LIFE ON OFFENCE, NOT DEFENCE

In the UK there’s a saying that ‘the best form of defence is attack’.

A useful metaphor is to see our days as battles. We are fighting Shaytan, fighting our nufus, fighting distraction and fighting time-wasting.

Indeed, Imam Shafi’i famously taught us that ‘Time is a sword; if you don’t cut it, it will cut you.’ Here again we have an image of battle.

Pre-planning is our weapon to win this battle. Just as any general of an army must plan how they will defeat their enemy on the battlefield, we must plan our days if we wish to stand a chance for winning our daily battles.

When you don’t plan, you are on the defensive and are completely vulnerable to all the ‘weapons of mass-distraction’ that will be thrust at you every hour and minute.

When you don’t plan, you become a victim to events and circumstances.

When you don’t plan, other people’s priorities will overtake your priorities.

Simply put: when you don’t plan, you fail.

PICTURE OF A BAD WORK DAY

 

You crawl out of bed after the third snooze, realize you’ve got 5 mins for Fajr and rush frantically to pray. Having woken up late, you only have 20 mins to get dressed, make breakfast and sprint to the car. But ‘Oh NO!!’ You forgot that it’s your turn to feed the kids and change their nappies!

After begging your irate spouse to help – and wasting 10 mins looking for socks – you manage to get out after 40 mins and wind up in traffic. You’re very late for work.

One hour later you’re finally at your desk after a 10 minute telling off from the boss. You’re so stressed you decide to start with a cup of coffee and check your emails. Ooh Aunty Zulaikha has had a baby – let’s see the photos.

30 mins later and your phone has started ringing. Different clients on minor projects take up your time for the next hour. What was it you were supposed to be doing today?

11am and you are dying for your ‘elevenses’ of compulsory coffee and a donut to help ‘energize’ you with a sugar rush. Unfortunately, your colleague started chatting to you in the kitchen and her offloading of problems just deflated you.

11.30 now. You remember the Big Project that you were meant to write a report upon. I’ll get to it after I install this new software. I feel so down I need to dosomething brainless for a while.

12.00 and the stupid software is not working. You go on forums to try and work it out. Even after lunch it take you another hour before you fix the crazy problem.

After the team meetings, debrief and more urgent calls, it’s 4.30pm when you remember that the report is due tomorrow. Tomorrow! I haven’t even started! The whole day has gone and I’ve done nothing!

You are so stressed with this realization you bang your head on the desk. There’s no point starting now. I’ll just have to cram it at home.

When you return home, you’re so dejected and overwhelmed you can barely smile when your kids leap on you as you enter home. I can’t relax – I need to pull an all-nighter now.

Your spouse and kids feel neglected as you rush to your study after wolfing down your dinner. Finally, you can get some work done.

The next morning, you don’t even hear the alarm clock. You’ve slept through Fajr and you suddenly jolt awake. You realize, with a sinking feeling in your gut, that you’ve got 10 minutes to get to work…

A GREAT DAY AT WORK

I hope the above didn’t sound too familiar. Now picture this…

You wake comfortably for a peaceful and calming Salat ul-Fajr. Your clothes are all ready from the night before. Spouse has the kids today as agreed over the weekend. After a nutritious breakfast, you leave punctually, making dhikr whilst you drive.

At work, before you even open your Inbox, you make your plan. You carefully think over the priorities this week and make a target for the day. The report for the Big Project is due tomorrow so you must block off a good few hours.

10-12 no-one disturbs me, you decide. After dealing with your email and a few minor calls, you close all your windows other than the Word doc where you will type your report. For the next 2 hours you diligently work on your report.

By 12 you’re a little tired after that deep work – but you feel over the moon. You finished the report! You’re so happy, you decide to take a 10 minute brisk walk to a café further down the road so you can get some exercise in.

After your return – and you pray a focussed Zuhr salah – you meet a troubled colleague in the kitchen. She offloads her problems to you. Since your endorphins are high from the walk, and your mind clear after the salah and productive morning, you are able to give her brilliant advice. You both walk back to your desks feeling better than before you met.

With the whole afternoon stretching ahead, you check your to-do list and quickly get through your tasks in priority order. After the mammoth job in the morning, this is a piece of cake.

One task, involving a software download, causes you problems. After 20 mins unsuccessfully trying to figure it out, you drop a message to the tech team and know you can come back to it in a few days.

The time 4-5 you have scheduled for batch email processing. It is so satisfying being in control of your Inbox instead of it being in control of you.

By the time you leave, you actually are on a high given how much you’ve got done.

You return home to embrace your lovely kids and have plenty of energy to play with them and spend quality time with the whole family.

A wonderful day at work and home, Alhamdulillah.

TWO SIMPLE TAKE-HOME TIPS

The discerning reader will realize that there are dozens of productivity principles at play in the two scenarios above. We could discuss routines, nutrition, exercise, prioritizing and delegation to mention a few. (Feel free to reply with your take-away points which you noticed.)

I hope the illustrations showed you how there are so many factors to success at work, and that they directly impact quality of life at home. Can you see how a lousy day at work can lead to a lousy time at home?

However, the focus of this article is pre-planning. Did you notice that in the Great Day – amongst many other subtle good habits – our protagonist started his workday by planning what his priorities were?

Once he did this – and got it done early on – the rest of the day was gravy. Whereas our defeated worker in the Bad Day was wrestling – and losing – to a few minor tasks, our hero in the Good Day blasted through 10X the amount of work. And most importantly, he got the report – the most important thing – done early on. This then gave him impetus and the positive energy to go home and engage with his family.

So, to make this really easy for you, I want you to commit to two simple – but massively powerful – techniques:

#1 – Identify your ONE Thing for the day
Allah is Ahad, One. Tauheed and Oneness is a sacred concept for Muslims. Interestingly, the concept of the One (in a different sense) has swept the productivity world in recent years.

An entire book, then later a course and now a whole productivity community was developed around the concept ‘The One Thing’ (the book by Gary Keller is worth reading but don’t bother with their expensive training; I’ll give you much better value with my upcoming courses inshaAllah).

The concept is both profoundly simple, but can be delved into incredible depth to impact your productivity or that of entire businesses no matter how big or small.

For now, all you need to grasp is that before you start work, ask yourself the following priceless question:

What’s the ONE thing I should do today that will make the biggest impact for my department/team/company/business?

In the scenarios above, it was the report for the Big Project. It could be planning a lesson if you’re a teacher, writing a proposal, designing a website.

Typically, it will be linked to an important project (yes, your ‘One Project’ but we’ll get into that another time!), and should take some deep, uninterrupted work to finish.

With me so far? That’s it for Tip #1. Decide, either the night before or first thing at work, what your One Thing is. Leo Babuta calls it his MIT (Most Important Task); I prefer HIT (Highest important task) as it sounds more impactful (and is the abbreviated name of my tutoring agency!). The name doesn’t matter. Just do it.

But you must decide your HIT before you start work. That is the hard part. It takes discipline.

#2 – Schedule one-hour time-blocks to do your One Thing
This is critical. It’s all and well to decide what’s important. If you don’t plan when you’ll do it, it won’t get done.
David Allen recommends you keep your calendar ‘sacred’. Anything you put on it becomes an appointment as important as that client meeting.

So when you block off that one hour for your One Thing, nothing should get in the way of it, short of an emergency.

It’s recommended to block this time slot early in your day as possible – ideally first thing – as you’ll have most energy to tackle it.

Note that what I’m asking you to do doesn’t take a lot of time – just an hour of your 8 hour work day, and perhaps 5-10 minutes of planning. This is the essence of effective time management. It’s not about being busy all day – that’s the illusion of working hard. It’s about working smart and leveraging your time. And it’s so powerful that you’ll be hooked once you try it.

Next week, I can’t wait to announce my first workshop of 2020. If you found value in the kind of concepts explored today, you’ll love what’s coming.

I challenge you to put today’s tips into action and see where it takes you.

Yours in productivity,

Tushar Imdad



P.S. Please forward this article to friends and family you think may benefit. Encourage them to subscribe. InshaAllah, through the regular motivating content they may be inspired to transform their lives.

If this article has been forwarded by a friend, you can sign up to the weekly newsletter here:
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Public Profiles & Media
https://tusharimdad.thinkific.com
https://podcast.makkahcentriceducation.com/017/
https://productivemuslim.com/interview-with-a-productive-muslim-tushar-bhuiya/
https://uk.linkedin.com/in/tushar-mohammed-bhuiya-0a466b13
https://seekersguidance.org/articles/featured-articles/islamic-time-management-1-the-ultimate-hack-in-islam-sidi-tushar-imdad/


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  
 A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   
Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in  productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included  ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.

Islamic Time Management: The Ultimate Hack in Islam (Part 2) – Sidi Tushar Imdad

The Ultimate Hack in Islam

Last week, we discovered that the greatest hack in Islam is undoubtedly the niyyah or intention.

Today, I want to explore three innovative ways in which you can utilise this amazing gift from Allah. I’m pretty sure some of these techniques will be new to you.

1. Start intending for mundane actions
As mentioned in the previous article, possibly 95% of our actions are outside formal ritual worship. How long does it actually take to pray our 5 daily prayers? Perhaps 1-2 hours a day if we include wudhu and going to the masjid for some prayers.

That leaves over 20 hours which could be wasted – if we neglect our intentions.

Most of this can be covered in 3 areas:
a) Sleep – around 8 hours a day. Don’t forget the Sunnah du’as and then INTEND that you are following the Sunnah of giving your body rest so it can better worship Allah when you wake.

b) Work – whether at the office, for your business or at home – again around 8 hours a day. When you set out to work, or at the start of your first task of the day make an intention then. E.g. ‘Ya Allah, I intend this work to serve my family and free me from begging from others.’

c) Family – around 3-4 hours morning and evening. When you see your spouse/child after a hard day of work, intend that you will love them, help them, teach them and guide them to worship Allah.

2. Global Intention
Not many Muslims have heard of this one. At the beginning of the day, make an intention for all the things you will do that day. I like to do this at Salat ul-Duha time and read a du’a like: ‘Rabbi taqabbal min-ni, hayaati, mamaati wa kulli a’amaali’ (My Lord! Accept from me my life, my death and all my works). In a few weeks, inshaAllah, I will be sharing some du’as like this which I recommend for your Morning Routine.

This hack saves you from having to remember to intend before every single action.

3. Multiple Intentions
Finally, another great way to earn multiple rewards for the same action is to make multiple intentions. For example, when you are relaxing with your family in the evenings, you can intend (a) strengthening family ties, (b) bringing happiness to the heart of a believer, (c) rest and refreshment as a recharge to do more ibaadah later. That’s three for one!

One of my teachers mentioned that the more one studies with the ‘ulema and the more sacred knowledge one has, the more intentions you will learn. Anyone who has studied fiqh with a trained ‘alim can attest to this!

For example, In Shaykh Aydarus’ wonderful little book ‘The Book of Intentions’ he gives 7 detailed intentions just for visiting a friend! And 18 for business/trading (will definitely post that on LinkedIn!).

What about getting to 100X or 700X reward? Well that depends on the strength and purity of one’s intention as well as the purity of one’s heart. There have been great figures in our history who could perform miracles through reciting the Fatiha alone. The method to get to that level is beyond my expertise and we all need to sit in the company of righteous scholars for such spiritual knowledge.

But we can ALL improve the quantity and quality of our intentions. So avoid shooting blanks and make sure you are maximising the reward and potential of Allah’s good pleasure by 1) intending for mundane actions like sleeping, eating, etc.; 2) make a global intention at the start of each day; and 3) make multiple intentions as much as you can to gain multiplied reward!!

If you enjoyed this article, you can sign up to Tushar’s mailing list for his weekly Jum’a articles, free content about Islamic Time Management as well as updates for exciting courses or services: https://mailchi.mp/5879bd7982eb/tusharimdad


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  
 
A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   
 
Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in  productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included  ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.


10 Reasons Not to Make a New Year’s Resolution This Year – Sidi Tushar Imdad

10 Reasons NOT to Make a New Year’s Resolution This Year

Every year the anticipation builds before January 1st to set a new habit or a new goal. And for 2020, it feels even more important. 2020 is such a nice, round number, right? We don’t want to miss out on ‘2020 Life Vision’ (get the pun?).

I’m giving you permission NOT to set any goals or resolutions or habits this January. You can relax. Your anxiety levels are probably rising at the thought, but here are 10 reasons why it may well be better to give New Year’s resolutions a miss:

#1 – It Doesn’t Work
How many times have you set a New Year’s resolution (NYR) to exercise more, or tidy up your home, or save more money – only to give up, even without realizing – a few months or even weeks into the habit?

Einstein defined insanity as ‘doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.’

So, this year, instead of reinforcing a self-fulfilling prophecy of failure (studies show that 92% of people fail to keep their resolutions), let’s do something different.

#2 – Resolutions are Typically Not Actionable
More often than not, resolutions are just vague intentions: ‘I will lose weight’, ‘I will make more money’, ‘I will eat more vegetables.’

David Allen in his hugely successful ‘Getting Things Done’ gives the simple example of clearing up your garage. If you give yourself the ‘task’ of ‘clear up the garage’, you’re highly likely to put it off until kingdom comes!

Instead, one should break down the task (which in this case is really a project) into much smaller actions and focus simply on the ‘Next Action.’ For example, ‘Get three boxes ready for garage clear out’.

#3 – Unrealistic Expectations
NYRs tend to be lists of hopes, wishes and vague goals. So in addition to not being actionable, there are simply too many goals to realistically achieve.

People who have achieved extraordinary results, and changed their lives around, almost always focussed on ONE habit or goal at a time. This allows you to harness all your energy on one habit and achieve success.

With multiple habits, you spread yourself thin and risk failing in all of them. Less is more with habit forming.

#4 – Weak External Motivation 
Even if you made an elaborate SMART plan for your NYR, you are still likely to fail as your motivation may well be wrong.

We tend to make resolutions because we think we should rather than because we want to. Perhaps it’s because it’s what we’ve always done, it’s tradition, or since everyone else does it, or countless articles/posts fill you with false hopes.

None of these are good reasons. These reasons rely on weak exernal motivation whereas you need strong, internal reasons for change.

No wonder that we lose steam after a few weeks when all the excitement dies and you realize, too late, that your why wasn’t strong enough.

#5 – Reverse Accountability
Habit forming experts are unanimous that accountability to a group is one of the strongest means for making your resolutions stick. There is a caveat. The group should be filled with inspiring people on a similar journey with plenty of role models.

With NYRs, you have the reverse of this: failing to meet resolutions is so common in society, you may subconsciously expect to fail before you begin!

#6(a) – Problematic Timing (1): Holidays Just Over
Ironically, the new year is actually a BAD time of year to form a goal or habit. This point is so fundamental, it expands to two reasons!

Firstly, you’ll be just finishing the holidays. Psychologically, it can be hard enough motivating yourself to return to work, let alone adding the pressure to meet a challenging NYR.

#6(b) – Problematic Timing (2): Winter
Secondly, January is in the heart of winter for most of us. Have you ever tried forming a walking habit in winter only to put it off for spring?

It’s not just with exercise. Since January is one of the most depressing months of the year, it will be an uphill emotional battle to make any major life change.

Dark, cold, wet. Sound motivating to you?

#7 – Long Year Ahead
If you start a habit in January, you can see the whole year stretching ahead of you with sunny days many months away. This makes it so easy to procrastinate as it’s hard to focus on one goal for so long.

We want lasting change, not just a short-term fix. New Year’s resolutions can often be like crash diets which rebound as soon as we hit our target weight.

If we want true lifestyle change that lasts a lifetime, then we need to be more systematic and intentional with our goals.

#8 – Unnecessary Stress
Setting an arbitrary date to set resolutions forces you to panic and think up of goals when you may not be ready – especially when there are 364 other perfectly good days to decide to change.

Furthermore, the mindset encouraged is a state of entering the new year wanting more in your life than you have right now. Wouldn’t it be great, instead, to be more grateful and present with what you have?

#9 – Tradition Divorced From its Origins
The practice of NYRs go back to the Babylonians and Romans who ‘celebrated’ the new year by offering sacrifices and pledges to their gods.

Interestingly, this is more in line with the Muslim philosophy of celebration. Eid, Jum’a, Dhul Hijjah and other holy times in the Muslim calendar are not marked with fireworks or secular goal setting. Rather, they are times for repentance (tauba), thanksgiving (shukr) and ibaadah (worship).

#10 – Distraction From the Most Effective Means of Change
Some people do nothing all year except the same lame, half-hearted resolutions every January 1st – which they inevitably break. It’s probably a deliberate ploy by our inner chimps (nafs) to avoid doing the real work of forming challenging habits.

New Year’s Resolutions can be trendy, convenient band-aids to real change. Sure, it’s possible to set realistic, time-specific, mission-driven and achievable goals in time for the new year. But for all the reasons above, you’re more likely to succeed in simply starting another time. When you’re truly ready and self-motivated.

What to Do Instead?
Having said all that, I appreciate that New Year’s Day is still a symbolic, memorable time and therefore there is emotion attached to the occasion. It’s a great excuse to do something important.

So, yes, we should leverage the beginning of 2020. But how?

That is the perfect topic for a special New Year’s Eve article to be sent only to my mailing list this coming Tuesday. If you’re not on my mailing list, sign up via the link below. You’ll get the article and access to much more.

If you enjoyed this article, you can sign up to Tushar’s mailing list for his weekly Jum’a articles, free content about Islamic Time Management as well as updates for exciting courses and services: https://mailchi.mp/5879bd7982eb/tusharimdad


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  

A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   

Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.


Islamic Time Management (1) : The Ultimate Hack in Islam – Sidi Tushar Imdad

The Ultimate Hack in Islam

Did you know that any good deed you do could be rewarded anywhere between one, to 10X, to 700X or ‘even more’?

Two people could both be working at a task, let’s say writing a report for work. One gets the reward of 1 and another gets 700!

The reality could be even more extreme. One person could be getting a NEGATIVE, by committing a sin through this report (for example, by recommending a haram transaction) and the other could be getting MILLIONS of hasanat (good deeds) for the same amount of effort.

The reason for the difference is the ultimate hack in Islam. And it’s something we all know, but seldom utilize to its INFINITE potential.

I’m talking about INTENTION (niyyah).

In one of the most foundational hadiths of the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace), we learn that ‘Actions are judged according to their intentions.’

Now we all know that we must make an intention before fasting, or getting married, or praying a particular salah. But do we make strong intentions for all the other actions which make up 95% of our time?

Imagine, if you knew a friend doing the same job as you. You both put in the same hours, the same effort and actually do the same thing. Yet you get paid £10/hr and she gets paid £100,000/hr! Talk about not meeting your potential! You’d feel utterly cheated, squandered and robbed of your time, right?

Well this could be happening to us right now! Imagine if for 95% of our time – our sleep, our eating, our 8-10 hours of daily work – we were only gaining 1 or even 0 good deeds (because we had no intention – just going through the motions). When we could have been gaining 700X for all of these same deeds!

The bottom line: if you don’t actively make good intentions then you are literally firing blanks on most of your days, most of your nights and most of your life.

The good news? This incredible gift from Allah is the most powerful hack imaginable as it means you can gain tens, hundreds and even 1000X more profit in this world and the next – with the same deed.

Think of it as the amount of return on investment (ROI) for your deeds. Someone puts £1 in a bank and it stays the same. Another person invests it into a halal enterprise and gains £1000s from the same £1.

You can do this with your deeds, and it’s much more valuable than money.

Now the question remains, HOW do you ensure a deed gets 10X or 100X or 700X or more?

That’s too much to answer for now, but it requires an understanding of the issues of QUANTITY and QUALITY of intentions – in order to cover all your bases. We’ll look into that in the next installment of this mini-series on ‘The Ultimate Hack in Islam’.

This is the type of knowledge what I term ‘Islamic Time Management’. It’s priceless and that’s why I’m so passionate about it.

If you enjoyed this article, you can sign up to Tushar’s mailing list for his weekly Jum’a articles, free content about Islamic Time Management as well as updates for exciting courses or services: https://mailchi.mp/5879bd7982eb/tusharimdad


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  
 
A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   
 
Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in  productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included  ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.

How Can I Find Balance in Religious Practice?

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I find practicing religion overwhelming after coming to know the importance of time. I read that wasting time is forbidden and I will have to account for it to Allah. It is very tough to pass a whole day only thinking about religion. I feel scared to meet my friends since most of them discuss only worldly affairs. How can I find a balance?

Answer: Wa’alaykum assalam. Jazakum Allah khayr for your question. May Allah reward you for wanting to take the religion seriously and with devotion.

The key in all matters is moderation. The Prophet ﷺ advised us that, ‘Religion is easy, and no one overburdens himself in his religion but he will be unable to continue in that way. So do not be extremists, but try to be near perfection and receive the good tidings that you will be rewarded. Gain strength by worshipping in the mornings and afternoons and during the last hours of the night.’ [al Bukhari, Muslim].

From this hadith it becomes obvious that a Muslim is not meant to be engrossed in worship at all hours of the day, as this is the life of a hermit. Rather, set aside some time in the day and evening for worship that is sustainable, otherwise one will burn out. Also, as we’ll see, worshiping God can take on many forms.

Balancing After life and worldly affairs

Allah Most High tells us, ‘But seek, amidst that which God has given thee, the Last Abode, and forget not thy portion of the present world.’ [28:77]. So one should not forget that one has a portion of this world that contains one’s livelihood, human relationships, and happiness. This world is a means to the next world, and part of human engagement with the world is enjoying some of the permissible avenues of provision and pleasure that it offers, within moderation.

This is why, when ‘A group of three men came to the houses of the wives of the Prophet ﷺ asking how the Prophet worshipped, and when they were informed about that, they considered their worship insufficient and said, “Where are we from the Prophet as his past and future sins have been forgiven.” Then one of them said, “I will offer the prayer throughout the night forever.” The other said, “I will fast throughout the year and will not break my fast.” The third said, “I will keep away from women and will never marry.”

Allah’s Messenger ﷺ came to them and said, “Are you the same people who said so-and-so? By Allah, I am more submissive to Allah and more afraid of Him than you; yet I fast and break my fast, I do sleep and I also marry women. So he who does not follow my tradition in religion, is not from me.’ [Al-Bukhari]

There is no one more god-fearing or devoted to God than the Prophet ﷺ, and he ﷺ commanded us to be moderate in our religious devotion and worldly affairs. Ai’sha (May Allah be pleased with her) was once asked, ‘What did the Prophet use to do in his house?” She replied, ‘He used to keep himself busy serving his family, and when it was time for prayer he would go out for it.’ [Al-Bukhari].

We can see that the Prophet ﷺ did not lock himself away in a room praying to Allah, reciting Quran, or teaching, but rather he gave everything and everyone their due, and participated in everyday life.

Right intentions

Worship doesn’t just have to be praying, reading Qu’ran, fasting, and lectures. Not everything has to be overtly religious. The Prophet ﷺ has said, ‘Be avid for that which benefits you’ and this benefit encompasses any form of benefit, whether religious, social, health, and in both worlds.

Rather, everything we do, from helping others at home or outside, doing our duties and obligations to others, studying and working to get a good job, spending quality time with family and friends, exercise and sports, cooking, and even reading or watching beneficial and permissible articles and documentaries etc., can all be a form of benefit and reward from Allah Most High, if one makes the right intention.

Right intentions can be to fulfil duties to others, earn a halal living, strengthening the ties of kinship and brotherly bonds, strengthening one’s body so one can worship Allah better, increasing in faith and gratitude to Allah through reflecting on the world and Allah’s creation, helping others and making things easy for them through housework and assistance, and many more noble intentions for even the most mundane matters.

Socialising

There is nothing wrong with socialising in moderation and meeting with friends. In fact, it is needed. We all need to have diversity in our lives in order to continue doing what we do. So socialising, hobbies and interests are good ways to revitalise us and continue with all our affairs, as well as a source encouragement to each other.

Its mentioned in al Bukhari that ‘The companions used to play with one another by throwing watermelon skins at each other, but when it was time for seriousness, they were real men’. Abu Salamah said, describing the Companions, ‘The Companions never exaggerated in seriousness, nor were they heedless; they used to recite poetry in their gatherings and mention some incidents which took place during their pre-Islamic period and laugh, but if they saw any action against Islam, they would become furious.’ [Ibn Abu Shaybah]

The moderation that the Sahaba had with the religion is that everything had its place and time, and part of this was socialising and being able to have fun or relax when it was appropriate.

The Prophet ﷺ was asked once, ‘Do you joke with us? He ﷺ replied, ‘I do, but I only say that which is true’ [Al Bukhari]. Again, we see the permissibility of being light hearted in the company of others without necessarily having to bring a profound or religious aspect to all our conversations, as long the conversations stay within certain limits.

Timetabling

It is important to timetable one’s daily routines so one makes the most of each day and night, and this is where time management is important. The Prophet ﷺ said, ‘The best deed in the sight of Allah is that which is done regularly.” [Ahmad].

Therefore, timetable your daily routine, incorporating time for different types of worship in the morning and night that is maintainable and will not tire you out. It is a trick of the devil to make yourself burn out until you find the religion overwhelming and unbearable, in the hope you will start to detest the religion and abandon it.

Do a little daily that is manageable, and not for long periods. If it ever feels too much, half the time put aside for religious devotion, or even less, until you feel it is easy, and then stay on that for a while until you want to do more, then increase very gradually. ‘God does not burden any human being with more than he is well able to bear. [2:286]

Ensure that your timetable includes time to spend with family and good friends (and relax with them!), and others things you need to do or like to do. Take it easy and give everything it’s due, including yourself.

May Allah grant you to every good.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Using Time Wisely, Finding a Teacher, and the Accountability of Seekers of Knowledge

Answered by Ustadh Abdullah Anik Misra

Question: As-salam Alaykom wa rahmatullah wa barakatuhu

1) This summer i am free i will work 3 weeks and then i have all the summer on me. I do not know how to use the summer effectively.

Do you have any advice for me how to use it and how to find a teacher?  I plan on studying with someone who is a  convert but studied in many years and become a shaykh of a tariqa.  I hope to learn a little bit of tazkiyat al nafs from him.

2) I heard that the more you have knowledge the more you will be tested from Allah and those who are near to Allah are much teasted i have always thought that if you got knowledge and higher rank in islam you will live a humble life and you’ll be happy and live a good life but it seems that the better you are the more you are tested from Allah. This makes me lose motivation to study and I then think that living as a simple Muslim is better since I won’t get tested as much.

Can you clarify this?

Answer: In the Name of Allah, Most Merciful and Compassionate,

As salamu alaikum,

Thank you for your letter. To answer your questions:

Using Your Summer Vacation Wisely

Fill your summer with productive activities. Most of all, try to achieve balance. For example, make time to seek sacred knowledge by taking a course at a local masjid, or online at the SeekersGuidance Academy, but also make time for recreation and social interaction.

Perhaps engage in a sport, volunteering opportunity or a constructive hobby. Meet with practicing Muslims, and try to pray in congregation more often. Give yourself projects to work on, such as reading the entire Quran with a translation, or another book or lecture series. Working part-time is good also as it allows you to save money to spend for various good purposes.

Purification of the Heart and Finding a Guide

It is highly recommended to engage in purification of the heart (Ar. tazkiya or tasawwuf) at the hands of a qualified spiritual guide, while studying the sacred sciences under qualified, mainstream traditional Islamic scholars.

One should prioritize learning one’s basic fiqh (sacred law) and aqeedah (beliefs) while working on the inward science of tazkiya, which focuses on building sincerity and love for Allah, along with prophetic character traits.

If there are no scholars in your area, try online options. I am not aware of the person you have named, so I cannot comment. Consult other reliable scholars or imams in your area who understand the importance of Islamic spirituality regarding your next steps.

The Responsibility that Comes with Knowledge

The more knowledge one has, the more one is accountable for in front of Allah Most High, since people are called to act upon their knowledge, and not merely to accumulate information. This does not mean ignorance is an excuse in front of Allah; every human must learn at least enough to live in accordance with the sacred law in every situation of their lives. Learning beyond that is the pursuit of the scholars.

The purpose of seeking knowledge is to gain the pleasure of Allah by shaping our lives and the lives of those around us to be in harmony with what He has commanded us to do, which will only benefit us in this world and the next. This is how we develop true love for Allah, the Most Loving.

The Good Life is a Life of Righteousness

Seeking knowledge – then acting upon it- allows one to live a righteous life, which is the essence of a good life. A good worldly life is not one that is free of any challenges or hardship whatsoever; rather, that is the life of the Hereafter in Paradise. It is a mistake to think the perfect life can be achieved here.

The reason we lose motivation to study upon learning about the tests and responsibilities that come with knowledge is because we are seeking other than Allah from our studies, without realizing it. If we are seeking an easier life with no trials, that is not the correct intention for studying sacred learning. One who finds Allah, finds everything; the one who does not find Allah, finds nothing worth finding, even if he acquires the whole world and what it contains.

The Prophet (Allah’s peace and blessings be upon him) said, “The scholars are the inheritors of the prophets.” [Tirmidhi] This inheritance is not wealth, but sacred knowledge. But along with inheriting knowledge, one also inherits something of its tests and challenges and responsibilities. When one focuses on seeking Allah through this knowledge, one also inherits a type of tranquility in one’s heart, which brings peace of mind and satisfaction even in turbulent times, and added joy and thanks in times of ease.

I say these words to myself first. May Allah Ta’ala keep us all firm on His path, make us sincere to Him, and teach us what will benefit us and benefit us through what He teaches us.

Wassalam,

Abdullah Anik Misra

Checked & Approved by Faraz Rabbani

Interview with a Productive Muslim: Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Interview with a Productive Muslim: Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

ProductiveMuslim.com is pleased to present to you an interview with a very ultra-Productive Muslim – Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.

Shaykh Faraz Rabbani is a researcher and teacher of the Islamic sciences, specializing in Islamic Law. He is the Educational Director of SeekersGuidance, and a partner and legal advisor with StraightWay Ethical Advisory.  He has two published books: Sufism & Good Character and Absolute Essentials of Islam: Faith, Prayer, and the Path of Salvation According to the Hanafi School (White Thread Press, 2004.)

Excerpt:

A ProductiveMuslim is someone who is successfully seeking the pleasure of Allah swt in their religion and worldly life – regardless of what they are doing. They say, “Your place is where Allah places you”. Where ever you are, seeking the pleasure of Allah SWT – in the way He has commanded, given your circumstances.

A truly ProductiveMuslim is someone, who understands the Prophetic example and who strives to live by it -both in their relationship with Allah and their relationship with Allah’s creation – someone who appreciates the Prophet’s example is one of beauty, excellence and sincere concern for good in one’s relationship to God and in relation to God’s creations.

A ProductiveMuslim is one, who has a sense of urgency and who is avid for the good and who seeks a consistent sustainable meaningful means of seeking the good for themselves and for those that they are responsible for – spouse, parents, children, and the society at large.

It is also important to make one’s work spiritual- make one’s “Islamic” work, spiritual. One does not do it merely for the work itself, but to keep in mind one is doing it for the sake of Allah and to begin in the name of Allah, striving to be in the remembrance of Allah. One must Seek Allah swt and connection to the Messenger of Allah (saws) by keeping in mind his radiant example (saws). Also, one can’t take on too much. One does what one can and stops before taking on what one can’t -to the best of ones’ ability.