Recommended Books on Jurisprudence, Raising Children and Marriage

Answered by Shaykh Yusuf Weltch

Question: Assalamu alaykum

1. Could you suggest a good book that would guide us in day to day acts and issues in the Hanafi Fiqh?

2. Could you suggest some books on how to raise children which helps us give them a solid foundation in Deen and dunya? And maybe a guide to marriage as well.

3. There are time I release semen (Mani) during urination. Do I have to perform Ghusl for that? It so happens if I don’t have a night fall, this condition keeps on recurring and I may have to do Ghusl many a times during the day for many days?

Answer: In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful and Compassionate

Book Recommendations

Fiqh:

(1) I would recommend as a basic primer of Hanafi fiqh – Ascent to Felicity – translated by Shaykh Faraz Khan. It is a detailed but not overwhelming text covering the basics on the rulings of worship.

Raising Children:

(2) Educating Children: Classical Advice for Modern Times by Imam Muhammad bin Ahmed al-Ramli

Marriage:

(3) Initiating and Upholding an Islamic Marriage by Hedaya Hartford

Releasing Semen During Urintation

It is not obligatory for you to perform a ritual bath (ghusl) if semen comes out when urinating. It is a condition that the semen come out with desire. The only exception to this is if one wakes up from sleep and finds a wetness on their clothes or body. This also necessitates ghusl. [Shurunbulali, Maraqi al -Falah]

Hope this helps
And Allah knows best
Yusuf Weltch

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a graduate from Tarim; student of Habib Umar and other luminaries; and authorized teachers of Qur’an and the Islamic sciences.

Beard and Coronavirus

Answered by Shaykh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

I am a male medical resident in an urban setting. The number of patients with Covid-19 in my hospital is increasing. To take care of these patients we have to wear these masks to protect ourselves from the virus. For the mask to properly fit one cannot have a beard. My administration says I can serve in other roles if I don’t want to shave. But I feel like this is an excusable reason to shave, and they may need me soon as this crisis worsens. Would this be an acceptable fiqh excuse to be clean shaven?

Answer: assalamu alaykum

If you are unable to properly wear the mask except after trimming your beard very short or shaving and are working, or are required/needed to work, with patients, you may trim your beard very short (optimal) or shave (less optimal).

The mainstream view of the Shafi`i school, for example, does not deem shaving to be sinful, but only disliked, which would cease if there is a valid excuse. Thus, there is plenty of leeway on this issue.

You should use your own common sense judgment on this especially given the nature of your job, which involves attempting to save the lives of people. You are best aware of your own situation, the situation of your hospital, and the people around you who require assistance.

[Shaykh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Salman Younas  graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman where he spent five years studying Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Oxford and continues his traditional studies with scholars in the United Kingdom.

Friday Prayer and Coronavirus

Answered by Shaykh Yusuf Weltch

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Can Firday prayer be missed in case of epidemic or pandemic like coronavirus pandemic?

Answer: In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful and Compassionate

It is permissible due to the pressing circumstances and the necessity to curb the spread of the coronavirus to abstain from the jumu’a prayer, any public congregational prayer, or any large gatherings.

It would be recommended to do so if one has reasonable fear of catching the virus or spreading it. Especially if one’s health is compromised or they feel flu like symptoms.

Beyond that it would be prohibited from one to attend such gatherings if they are a confirmed case of coronavirus.

Instructions of the Scholars

The above are the instructions given by leading islamic scholars of our time.

Please see the below links for more details.

Guidance on the Coronavirus & Attending the Mosque

Dealing with the Coronavirus – Mufti Taha Karaan

COVID-19 Webinar: A Global Islamic Response to the Coronavirus Pandemic

Can I perform Friday Prayer (Jum’a) at Home during the Coronavirus

Hope this helps
And Allah knows best

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a graduate from Tarim; student of Habib Umar and other luminaries; and authorized teachers of Qur’an and the Islamic sciences.

Cremation and Coronavirus

Answered by Shaykh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

At times of calamity, like the current Corona Virus, is cremation allowed in Islam if the government of the country has a rule to cremate all victims of the virus?

Answer: assalamu alaykum

The basis is that cremation is absolutely forbidden and Muslims should do whatever is legally in their power to prevent laws being passed that force cremating bodies.

The human being is endowed with dignity. The body is a gift from Allah; it cannot be disfigured, mutilated, harmed or desecrated. Allah said, “We have ennobled the children of Adam.” (17:70) The Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him) said, “Breaking the bone of a dead person is similar in sin to breaking the bone of a living person.” (Abu Dawud)

Burial of the body is part of maintaining its dignity. In the case of Muslims, specific funerary rites, such as washing, shrouding, the funeral prayer, and burial, serves to both dignify and honour our brothers and sisters in faith who have passed on to the next world.

Alternatives to burial are not acceptable. If the government seeks to legislate cremation as a rule, Muslims should try their utmost to be exempted from these rules, while taking appropriate steps in their burial processes to address government concerns.

However, if the government does legislate it and there is no option for Muslims in that land to bury their deceased, this would constitute a necessity (darura) that is forced upon the community. In this case, they would be excused for letting the bodies of the deceased undergo cremation and should continue lobbying to have such legislation scrapped.

Finally, it should be noted that ultimately, whether one is buried or otherwise, the status of an individual does not change with Allah. Whether the deceased is washed or not, buried or not, etc., he or she will will suffer no ill effects from any shortfalls on the part of the community to ensure proper funerary rites.

[Shaykh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Salman Younas  graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman where he spent five years studying Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Oxford and continues his traditional studies with scholars in the United Kingdom.

Mortgage and Divorce

Answered by Shaykh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

My ex husband and I put money together to buy a house. We did a mortgage and had to put each a down-payment. We bought a house then he made the payments for the monthly mortgage.I took care of all the bills for the house including feeding. Now we are divorcing and I would like to know what is the fair way to deal with the house.

Answer: In the Name of Allah, Most Merciful and Compassionate

assalamu alaykum

This is a difficult question for which I currently do not have a conclusive legal answer.

However, even in the absence of a clear shariah legal position regarding the division of assets in such cases, what I would advise you and your ex-husband is to reach an amicable and fair settlement (sulh). This should take into account both of your contributions – whether financial or otherwise – to your home, its purchase, and maintenance.

Engaging in an amicable settlement in cases of dispute is praised by Allah who says, “If a woman fears ill treatment or aversion from her husband, then, there is no sin on them in entering into an amicable settlement between themselves. Settlement is better. Although human souls are prone to selfishness, if you do good and are mindful of God, He is well aware of all that you do.” (Qur’an, 4:128)

This is the recommended way forward when it comes to matters of dispute. It may require involving people who have legal expertise and can fairly adjudicate the matter, but it should be the first step one takes in such situations.

[Shaykh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Salman Younas  graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman where he spent five years studying Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Oxford and continues his traditional studies with scholars in the United Kingdom.

Inheritance and Half Siblings

Answered by Shaykh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

My father married twice; his first wife passed away and then he married my mother. From his first wife he has 1 son and 2 daughters .
My father had 5 sons and 2 daughters from my mother.

My question is about the money left after my father passed away. Do my half siblings have any right to that money?

We also didn’t pay for my fathers funeral from that money, rather myself and a couple of my brothers contributed as we didn’t have access to the funds at the time. Does that money have to be paid back to them?

Answer: assalamu alaykum

1. All of your father’s children are entitled to a portion of the wealth he left behind. This includes children he had from any previous wives.

2. Regarding the funeral costs, this does not have to be paid back to them if they decided to pay for it with their own money. The funeral arrangements are the responsibility of the surviving family of the deceased.

[Shaykh] Salman Younas

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Salman Younas  graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman where he spent five years studying Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir. He is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Oxford and continues his traditional studies with scholars in the United Kingdom.

Can I Perform Friday Prayer (Jum’a) at Home During the Coronavirus Pandemic?

In this answer, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani clarifies that Friday prayers cannot be held at home when cancelled at local mosques. Instead, one may pray the dhuhr prayer in congregation where feasible. Shaykh Faraz also gives advice on how we can attain the spiritual benefit of this blessed day even as our regular routines are disrupted.

You will find below the video relevant quotes regarding this issue from reliable Hanafi books.

:مراقي الفلاح

والخامس من شروط صحة الجمعة (الإذن العام) كذا في الكنز لأنها من شعائر الإسلام وخصائص الدين فلزم إقامتها على سبيل الاشتهار والعموم

:حاشية الطحطاوي

قوله: (لأنها من شعائر الإسلام وخصائص الدين) أي وقد شرعت بخصوصيات لا تجوز بدونها والإذن العام والأداء على سبيل الشهرة من تلك الخصوصيات ويكفي لذلك فتح أبواب الجامع للواردين كذا في الكافي

:الفتاوى الهندية

وَمِنْهَا الْإِذْنُ الْعَامُّ: وَهُوَ أَنْ تُفْتَحَ أَبْوَابُ الْجَامِعِ فَيُؤْذَنَ لِلنَّاسِ كَافَّةً حَتَّى أَنَّ جَمَاعَةً لَوْ اجْتَمَعُوا فِي الْجَامِعِ وَأَغْلَقُوا أَبْوَابَ الْمَسْجِدِ عَلَى أَنْفُسِهِمْ وَجَمَعُوا لَمْ يَجُزْ وَكَذَلِكَ السُّلْطَانُ إذَا أَرَادَ أَنْ يَجْمَعَ بِحَشَمِهِ فِي دَارِهِ فَإِنْ فَتَحَ بَابَ الدَّارِ وَأَذِنَ إذْنًا عَامًّا جَازَتْ صَلَاتُهُ شَهِدَهَا الْعَامَّةُ أَوْ لَمْ يَشْهَدُوهَا، كَذَا فِي الْمُحِيطِ وَيُكْرَهُ، كَذَا فِي التَّتَارْخَانِيَّة وَإِنْ لَمْ يَفْتَحْ بَابَ الدَّارِ وَأَجْلَسَ الْبَوَّابِينَ عَلَيْهَا لَمْ تَجُزْ لَهُمْ الْجُمُعَةُ، كَذَا فِي الْمُحِيطِ

Guidance on the Coronavirus & Attending the Mosque

Answered by Shaykh Salman Younas

Question: Would it be permissible to not go to congregational prayers (including Friday prayer) due to the spread of disease such as Coronavirus. Likewise, if your mother wishes for you to not go to congregational prayers due to the worry of getting infected what should you do?

Answer: assalamu alaykum

The basis is that if there is reasonable fear of contracting this illness or spreading it in a specific location by going to such public gatherings, one must not go.

Given the current situation and guidelines provided by organisations like WHO (The World Health Organization), the approach being advised is, however, rightly one of excessive precaution. This means you should not go to the mosque (including Friday prayer) if:

(a) You have flu-like symptoms, even if minor,
(b) You have been around people who have flu-like symptoms, even if minor,
(c) You are in an area where the authorities have strongly advised against attending public gatherings, or have temporarily banned such gatherings [Note: In certain places, governments are very slow to respond and their information out-of-date or underestimates owing to a lack of sufficient testing and resources. All the while, confirmed cases of coronavirus continue to rise. One should always use his or her own independent and reasonable judgment and avoid public gatherings especially if there are signs of community spread of the virus in one’s area.]
(d) Reliable health experts in your locale have strongly advised the implementation of social distancing policies to curb the spread of the disease.
(e) You fit the description of those who the authorities have advised to enter self-isolation, such as people who have recently visited countries where the risk of coronavirus is high (China, Italy, Iran, Japan, etc.).
(f) You are an elderly person or someone with underlying health condition, especially if in an area where there are, or likely to be, cases of infection.

The need to avoid public gatherings, including the mosque, is even more pressing if one is in close contact with elderly people at home or elsewhere since they are particularly vulnerable to this disease, which spreads largely unnoticed. The responsibility of every individual Muslim is not simply to protect himself from harm, but also not being a cause of harm to others.

Therefore, it should be noted that while highly meritorious to pray in the mosque, the confirmed sunna for the general congregational prayers (besides the Friday prayer) is simply to pray in congregation – whether at home or elsewhere. Given current developments and the way events are unfolding, it would be firmly advised that one temporarily avoid attending the mosque for the general congregational prayers even in the absence of the conditions mentioned above.

As for Friday prayer, in the absence of the conditions mentioned above, it would remain ideal to attend. However, even here the potential for harm should be limited as much as possible. This means that women and children should be told to stay home as the Friday prayer is not obligatory upon them. Elderly people and those with underlying health conditions should also be advised the same. Mosques should put in place measures to keep their premises clean and prevent the spread of this disease. For some guidelines on this (specific to the UK), please see the guidance of the BBSI (British Board of Scholars & Imams) by following this link.

Update 1: In regard to point (e), if such a time arises where social distancing is seen as required by experts to curb the spread of this disease, which seems to be the case in many places now, the individual – even if otherwise healthy – should not attend large or concentrated gatherings and events at mosques. The community in this case is exempt from the Friday prayer and people should pray Dhuhr at home. Furthermore, taking into account expert advice and their responsibilities to congregants and the wider community, mosque committees should also seriously & quickly decide on implementing social distancing measures, which is increasingly the advice of numerous health and policy experts and should therefore be heeded. This may entail canceling or severely restricting prayer services for such a duration where the spread of coronavirus can be effectively limited. The exact duration and decisions concerning scaling up or down social distancing measures are best determined in consultation with relevant experts who understand evolving local situations.

[Shaykh] Salman Younas

Shaykh Salman Younas  graduated from Stony Brook University with a degree in Political Science and Religious Studies. After studying the Islamic sciences online and with local scholars in New York, Ustadh Salman moved to Amman where he spent five years studying Islamic law, legal methodology, belief, hadith methodology, logic, Arabic, and tafsir. He the went on to complete his PhD at the University of Oxford and continues his traditional studies with scholars in the United Kingdom.

Recitation of Ghayn

Answered by Shaykh Yusuf Weltch

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Must I stress the letter ‘ghayn’ when reciting if I have difficulty distinguishing it from the sound of ‘kha’?

Is it acceptable if the Iqama is recited softly?

Answer: In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful and Compassionate

The Volume of Recitation in a Quiet Prayer

If reciting very quietly makes it difficult to recite the letter ‘ghayn’ properly you are allowed to raise your voice slightly. In a quiet prayer, however, you should not recite so loud that the first row can hear you. That would be considered reciting loudly.

[Ibn ‘Abidin, Radd al-Muhtar citing the Khulasa]

If you happen to make the ‘kha’ sound when reciting the ‘ghayn’ the prayer remains valid.

[Ibn ‘Abidin, Radd al-Muhtar]

Learning Proper Recitation

With that being said, you need not stress over this but I would advise finding a reliable Qur’an teacher to teach you the proper exit point for the letters. This will facilitate for you improving your recitation.

Hope this helps
And Allah knows best
Yusuf Weltch

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a graduate from Tarim; student of Habib Umar and other luminaries; and authorized teachers of Qur’an and the Islamic sciences.

Prayers to be Made up

Answered by Shaykh Yusuf Weltch

Question: Assalamu alaykum

What missed prayers other than the Fard prayers must I make up?
What times am I allowed to make up prayers and how many can I make up at a time?

Answer: In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful and Compassionate

Prayers that Must Be Made Up

The only prayers that must be made up if missed are the fard (obligatory) prayers and wajib (necessary) prayers, such as the 5 obligatory prayers and the witr prayer. The sunna prayers are not made up.

Permissible Times to Make Up Prayers

It is permissible to make up missed prayers at any time except for the following three times.

(A) After praying the fajr prayer until the sun fully rises.
(B) When the sun is at its zenith just before dhuhr prayer.
(C) After praying the asr prayer until the sun sets.

When making up missed prayers at a permissible time one can pray as many prayers as they wish. However they cannot combine the intention of multiple make up prayers into one prayer.

For example, one cannot pray four units of prayer and intend the three asr prayers that one missed. Rather they must pray each individual prayer on its own.

[Ref: [Shurunbulali, Maraqi al -Falah]

Hope this helps
Allahu A’alam

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a graduate from Tarim; student of Habib Umar and other luminaries; and authorized teachers of Qur’an and the Islamic sciences.