Changing my Intention While Fasting

Answered by Shaykh Yusuf Weltch

Question: If I begin a make-up fast, then change my intention to a voluntary fast, does that affect the type of fast?

Answer: Jazak Allah Khairan for your question.

Your change of intention, after having started a fast, will not harm or alter your fast, whatsoever. The original intention upon which the fast was started will remain.

“…the fasting person, who is making up an obligatory fast, if after having started the fast, he intends to start a different fast, it would not harm (the original fast).” [Maraqi al-Falah]

Allahu ‘Alam

[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a graduate from Tarim; a student of Habib Umar and other luminaries; and authorized teachers of the Qur’an and the Islamic sciences.

Making the Most of Ramadan (Part 1)

As Ramadan gets closer, here are some highlights from our popular On-Demand course, Making the Most of Ramadan: Transformative Lessons from Learned Islamic Scholars.making the most of ramadan

Part 2: The Aims of Fasting by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

In this section, Shaykh Faraz covers portions of the book, “The Higher Aims of Fasting,” by the great scholar Al-Izz ibn Abd As-salam, who was known as “The Sultan of the Scholars” due to his high rank and profuse understanding in the religion. He was an expert in Islamic law amongst other sciences.

It is divided into 4 sections:

  1. Duty & Virtues of Fasting from Qur’an & Sunna
  2. The Sunnas and Etiquette of Fasting
  3. The Spiritual Works of Ramadan
  4. Fasting and Spiritual Works Beyond Ramadan

Through this course you will get a true sense of the ultimate purpose of fasting based on the Quran and the blessed Sunnah of the Beloved Prophet, Allah bless him and give him peace. There are plenty of hadiths mentioned throughout the class that you may benefit from listening to or even memorising, to better internalise the meaning.

You will also discover the 7 great virtues of the fast. Such as raising in ranks; expiation of errors, breaking desires and so on.

The book has a very valuable  section on the adab(etiquette) of fasting such as guarding the tongue and what to break the fast with.

As the blessed month of Ramadan, this course is a must have in order to be mentally prepared and energised before its arrival.

For more information about this class or to register, click here.


Making the Most of Ramadan (Part 2)

As Ramadan gets closer, here are some highlights from our popular On-Demand course, Making the Most of Ramadan: Transformative Lessons from Learned Islamic Scholars.making the most of ramadanmaking the most of ramadan

Part 2: The Sweetness of His Love by Imam Zaid Shakir

In this course, special guest Imam Zaid Shakir, known for his powerful speeches and tireless service to communities across North America and beyond, will take you on a very special journey of deep reflection.

Drawing on the many aspects of fasting, he develops on the increase in one’s God-consciousness and obedience through fasting. He reflects on how fasting impacts an individual, growing the desire to initiate an inner transformation.

Imam Zaid goes on about how to attain forgiveness as a reward of the fast, on how and why you should seek Allah to attain forgiveness as a reward of fasting. Do you know the immense reward of feeding someone who fasted all day? How about drawing closer to Allah by feeding one of His servants?

Ramadan is not only about the day where one fasts, but its also and mostly about its blessed nights. You will learn about the incredible value of Laylat al-Qadr (the Night of Destiny), it’s immense worth, and why you should make more effort on that night more than any other nights.

Lastly, through this course you will learn about reviving your spiritual energy, and have a more profound understanding of how it can affect and improve your life, and the relationship between fasting, spiritual energy and elevation.  

So many good insights, not to be missed!

For more information or to register, click here.


Making the Most of Ramadan (Part 3)

As Ramadan gets closer, here are some highlights from our popular On-Demand course, Making the Most of Ramadan: Transformative Lessons from Learned Islamic Scholars.making the most of ramadanmaking the most of ramadanmaking the most of ramadan

 

Part 3: The Expression of Love by Ustadha Zainab Ansari

 

In this section,  Ustadha Zainab focuses on the relationship between us and Allah through the lens of love.

You will learn that fasting is actually a way to be expressing your love to Allah by following the commitment inscribed in the book of God and the Sunnah. Fasting is essentially an invisible act or worship, with no one knowing that you’re fasting except yourself and your Lord. This creates an aspect of strong intimacy between yourself and Allah.ramadan

Through the physical difficulty of hunger, you are proving your love to Allah. By you being gifted obey Him and fasting for His sake only, you may start to realise that you received this blessing and ability out of His immense love for you. Indeed, it is Allah who creates in you a physical desire to please Him, and you choose respond to him just to please Him. This is what love is all about.

When you fast, you overcome the primal instinct to attain a higher spiritual level. Resisting your hunger helps to raise your spiritual strength and improves your control over the body and soul. Food can be a mean to discipline yourself, or it can be a test and a mean to spiritual disaster.

Ustadha Zainab talks about the implementation of a strong relationship with the Qur’an, the Divine Word of Allah, and the night prayers. There is a spiritual secret to be discovered by the seeker if he searches thoroughly.

Ramadan might be the moment of an epiphany for you. That moment you turn your life around and travel the blessed path which you always wanted to sail onto. People get spiritual openings through Ramadan all the time. Seize that Ramadan to be one of them!

For more information or to register, click here.


 

Tasting Something When Fasting

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Is my fast invalid if I taste something in my mouth?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum assalam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

I pray you are well.

Merely getting a taste of something in your mouth does not invalidate your fast. It has to pass down your throat to invalidate the fast. In these situations, you merely tasted something, and that does not affect the fast.

Unavoidable Substances

Steam, smoke from traffic, flour that disperses in the air, and similar substances which are hard to avoid do not invalidate the fast if they are inhaled with a valid excuse. It would be pretty difficult to cook or have a shower without having any of the streams enter one’s mouth or nose, so it is excused. (Shurunbulali, Maraqi al Salah; Ibn Abidin, Radd al Muhtar)

Learn for Confidence

The Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and grant him peace, said, “Indeed [the practice of] the din is eased itself, and no one makes it hard on themselves except that it overwhelms them.” (Bukhari) This is a central hadith, and it clearly shows that following the sunna should make religious practice easy.

One of the ways to make things easy is to learn them properly from an experienced and qualified teacher. This goes a long way in alleviating unnecessary worries. Please register for a course, and actively take part in it to maximize the benefit you get. Registration will open in a week or so.

May Allah grant you the best of both worlds.

[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 where, for 18 months, he studied with erudite scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish, and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish. In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years in Sacred Law (fiqh), legal theory (Usul al-fiqh), theology, hadith methodology, hadith commentary, and Logic with teachers such as Dr. Ashraf Muneeb, Dr. Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr. Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr. Mansur Abu Zina, and others. He was also given licenses of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabir and Shaykh Yahya Qandil. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic sciences, tafsir, Arabic grammar, and Arabic eloquence.

Ramadan 2020 Reminders | Episode 6:

In age of social media, Ramadan is a great opportunity to work on self-discipline, especially on restraining our speech.

Preserving the Light of Ramadan – Habib Umar bin Hafiz

How do we preserve the light of Ramadan once the month has ended?

 

One of the keys to preserving what we have attained is in the intentions we make before the month ends. We should make firm intentions to do good in Shawwal and beyond. We also need to beg Allah to preserve and increase the gifts He has given us. We need to be consistent in our attendance of gatherings and classes, consistent in our recitation of the Quran while reflecting upon its meanings and consistent in our recitation of the adhkar with presence of heart. We must also choose the best company and sit in the presence of people who have been given light.

Intentions For After Ramadan – Habib Umar bin Hafiz

What intentions should we make for after Ramadan?

 

We intend to be among those whose entire year is Ramadan

We intend that our connection with Allah is expressed in our actions throughout the day and the night

We intend to serve the Ummah in the best way by focusing on the Three Objectives (knowledge, devotion and service)

We intend to seek the pleasure of Allah and to make His Messenger ﷺ happy in all that we do

We intend to attain an increase in presence of heart with Allah at all times but especially during the prayer and recitation of the Quran and the adhkar

We intend to establish gatherings with our brothers and sisters who we love for Allah’s sake

We intend to fast the Six Days of Shawwal and other blessed days such as Tāsūā’ and Ashura (9th and 10th Muharram) and the Day of Arafah and at least three days in every month

Zakat & Eid al Fitr – Ustadh Abdul Muhaymin

In this video, Ustadh Abdul Muhaymin  speaks about the blessings of the day of Eid, and what etiquettes we should practice on that day.

Ustadh Abdul Muhaymin encourages us to take advantage of the blessed day of Eid al-Fitr, which is a day of celebration and thanksgiving after the completion of the month of Ramadan. We should all come out to celebrate Eid with our families, and we should ensure that no one is left at home. He calls on the men to not leave female family members at home, but support them in coming out and celebrating.eid al-fitr

In addition, we should ensure that we are fulfilling all of our duties and responsibilities on this day. We should ensure that we have paid the Zakat al-Fitr, the charity that all Muslims are required to make before the day of Eid, or on that day. In addition, we should make sure that no one is left out on the day, making the effort to visit or invite the ones who might not have anyone to celebrate with. We should also try to meet new people and reconnect with old friends, and make sure we do not harbour a grudge against anyone.


 

The Impact and Fruits of Worship in Ramadan and Beyond – Shaykh Faid Mohammed Said

Originally Published on 15/06/2017

In this Friday sermon, Shaykh Faid Mohammed Said calls us to make the most of what is left of Ramadan. He provides key advice on how to engage in worship that impacts and reflects on us positively. The impactful and fruitful worship he talks about is one that rectifies our character, and lasts beyond Ramadan. Shaykh Faid gives multiple examples of worship with lasting impact through multiple stories of the companions of the Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings upon him and his folk).

* This Friday sermon was delivered at Jame Masjid Mississauga (Coopers Masjid), on June 9th, 2017. With special thanks to Ustadh Nazim Baksh for providing the recording of the sermon.