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If I Buy a Prohibited Item, Is the Change Received Haram?

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

If someone has money that is not haram and buys something haram with it, for example alcohol, does the change he recieved from purchasing the alcohol become haram money?

Answer: Wa’alaykum assalam. Thank you for your question.

If you bought a prohibited item with halal money, then the change received from the transaction is still considered halal money, and therefore permissible to keep.

The sin is in the transaction itself (which is void) and whatever one uses the prohibited item for. As such, one should repent and return the item if possible, in which case the refunded money is permissible to keep.

Related posts:

Haram Money Archives

Haram Income Archives

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Four Obstacles to Obedience to Allah

We’ve all been through the moment where we’re ready to make change and get right with God, but when we try, we just can’t seem to follow through. Either our plans aren’t sustainable, or our old ways are just too tempting. In this series of lectures, Ustadh Amjad Tarsin, chaplain at the University of Toronto, tells us about the four obstacles to obedience:

Ignorance, Weakness of Faith, Long Hopes and Illicit Food

Take Ustadh Amjad’s free SeekersHub course: The Prophetic Call: Imam Haddad’s Counsel on Calling to Allah Explained.

Resources for Seekers

We are grateful to the Muslim Chaplaincy at UofT for these recordings. Cover photo by Darwin Bell.

A Thief Who Changed and Became a Saint

The moment you think you are better than others because of your deen, know for certain that you are not.

How did a thief  change himself such that he became a saint? Shaykh Walead Mosaad speaks of the change in Bayazid Bostami’s life that happened in just one moment. He uses this example and others to explain why we should not be so quick to judge others, as we just don’t know.

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Resources for Seekers

Cover photo by Kevin Chow

Feeling unmosqued, demosqued and no-thank-you-mosqued?


Are you a Muslim woman who feels unmosqued, demosqued and no-thank-you-mosqued? You’re not alone but you must be part of the change. Ustadha Anse Tamara Gray has some excellent advice on how to move forward, with healing and positivity, in this video for Muslimah Media.

Electing for Real Change: Shaykh Faraz Rabbani on the recent Canadian election

SYEDA-KHADIJA-CENTREAt the Syeda Khadija Centre, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani considers the recent Canadian election of 2015. Many Muslim candidates have been elected and the new leader – shalwar-kameez wearing, masjid-visiting Justin Trudeau, aged 43, has evoked much excitement and commentary amongst Muslim communities. However, Shaykh Faraz asks, are we a people who reflect?

Can a Woman Take Her Husband’s Non Islamic Surname?

Answered by SeekersGuidance Answers Service

Question: Assalamu alaikum,

1) Is there any ruling on changing or not changing one’s surname to one’s husband’s after marriage?

2) My husband is a revert and has a Scottish surname and my dad says that it’s wrong to change my Islamic surname which to a non Islamic name. Is this view correct?

Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullah,

I pray that this message finds you well, insha’Allah.

(1) It is permitted for the wife to take her husband’s surname. This is simply a customary practice adopted by many.

Please see: Can a Woman Take Her Husband’s Surname?

(2) No, it is not necessary for someone to change his name after becoming Muslim.

However, it is a recommended sunna to do so if one’s name has an undignified or unbefitting meaning. [Qari, Mirqat al-Mafatih, quoting Nawawi; al-Mawsu`ah al-Fiqhiyya al-Kuwaitiyya]

`Aisha reported that the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) used to change bad names. [Tirmidhi]

Brief Guidelines on Names

[1] In general, it is permitted to take any name which doesn’t have a negative or problematic meaning or connotation.

[2] There is no obligation to change your name, particularly if the name doesn’t have a bad primary meaning.

[3] There is benefit in choosing a “Muslim” name, and this is generally a highly recommended sunna. For example, taking the names of Prophets, the great righteous men and women of Islamic history, and names indicating one’s belief in God such as `Abdullah and `Abd al-Rahman.

[4] It is permitted without dislike to take the names of angels.

[5] It is permitted to take the names of Allah, such as Karim or Hasib, except for those which exclusively belong to Allah, like Rahman, for example.

[6] Taking ugly names, like Shaitan and Zalim, or names with bad meanings or connotations is highly disliked.

[7] You can use both names [birth name & ‘new’ name], whether in different contexts (such as keeping your birth name in dealings with parents, family, and perhaps even professional situations), or interchangeably–as there is nothing wrong with having multiple names you are referred to by.

Please see: Is it Necessary to Change One’s Name after Becoming Muslim?

And Allah alone gives success.

wassalam,

SeekersHub Answers Service

Checked & Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Is it Necessary to Change One’s Name after Becoming Muslim?

Answered by Ustadh Tabraze Azam and Shaykh Faraz Rabbani
Question: Assalam Alaikum,
An aquaintance of mine has recenlty accepted Islam. He was a Hindu before he came to Islam and wants to know if it is neccessary for him to change his name.
Answer: Wa alaikum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,
I pray that you are in the best of health and faith, insha’Allah.
No, it is not necessary to change your name after becoming Muslim.
However, it is a recommended sunna to do so if your name has an undignified or unbefitting meaning. [Qari, Mirqat al-Mafatih, quoting Nawawi; al-Mawsu`ah al-Fiqhiyya al-Kuwaitiyya]
`Aisha reported that the Messenger of Allah (Allah bless him and give him peace) used to change bad names. [Tirmidhi]
Brief Guidelines on Names
[1] In general, it is permitted to take any name which doesn’t have a negative or problematic meaning or connotation.
[2] There is no obligation to change your name, particularly if the name doesn’t have a bad primary meaning.
[3] There is benefit in choosing a “Muslim” name, and this is generally a highly recommended sunna. For example, taking the names of Prophets, the great righteous men and women of Islamic history, and names indicating one’s belief in God such as `Abdullah and `Abd al-Rahman.
[4] It is permitted without dislike to take the names of angels.
[5] It is permitted to take the names of Allah, such as Karim or Hasib, except for those which exclusively belong to Allah, like Rahman, for example.
[6] Taking ugly names, like Shaitan and Zalim, or names with bad meanings or connotations is highly disliked.
[7] You can use both names [birth name & ‘new’ name], whether in different contexts (such as keeping your birth name in dealings with parents, family, and perhaps even professional situations), or interchangeably–as there is nothing wrong with having multiple names you are referred to by.
A useful book is: Islamic Names by Muhammad Imran Ashraf Usmani
Please also see the following resources:
(a) Is it Permissible to Name Children with Names of Angels?
(b) Naming Children with the Names of Allah
(c) Giving an Adopted Child Your Family Name
(d) Can a Man Change His Last Name?
(e) Naming Children with the Names of Allah
(f) Can a Woman Take Her Husband’s Surname?
And Allah alone gives success.
wassalam,
Tabraze Azam & Faraz Rabbani