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Do I Need To Have an Intention To Receive a Reward From Allah?

Question: Do I Need To Have an Intention To Receive a Reward From Allah?
Answer: 
Thank you for your important question.
Actions Are Based Upon Intention

The Prophet (Allah bless him & give him peace) said, “Verily actions are by their intentions, and one shall only have that which one intended.” [Bukhari & Muslim]The scholars mention that actions are only rewarded due to their intentions behind them.

So, in your case, you should make that intention at the moment so you can receive the reward.

 

Statements Of Scholars About Intentions

Imam Ibn Ata’illah (Allah have mercy upon him) said,
“Actions are lifeless forms whose souls are the secret of sincerity in them.”

Abdullah ibn al-Mubarak said, “How often it is that a small action is made great by its intention, and a great action is made small by its intention.”

Further recommended readings;

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/actions-are-rewarded-due-to-intentions/

A very beautiful and more detailed article on intention;

https://seekersguidance.org/answers/general-counsel/the-reality-and-importance-of-intention/

I pray this helps and if you take just a few minutes to read the above links, it will shed a lot of light on your question.

Allah knows best.

[Imam] Yama Niazi
Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

A Student’s Intention Supplication

A Student’s Intention Supplication

by Shaykha Ieasha Prime

Introduction

At her weekly “Live and Learn” class hosted by the Islamic Centre at New York University on 13th April 2020, Shaykha Ieasha Prime taught her students a special intention supplication (dua) to make at the commencement of the class.

The supplication can be made by a student learning in a classroom or online with a teacher, or even by himself.

It is reproduced as follows:

 

Student’s Intention Supplication to Allah Most High

In the name of Allah, Most Gracious, Most Merciful

I intend to learn and to teach

To benefit and to be benefiting

To remind and to be reminded

To call to the Book of Allah (Qur’an) and the Sayings, Practices, and Teachings (Sunna) of His Messenger (peace and blessings be upon him)

To guide and to be guided by soundproof and correct knowledge

To seek the countenance of my Lord and nearness to Him and His reward

To expose myself to the mercy of Allah Most High

To expose myself to His forgiveness, His generosity, and to His kindness

To hope that Allah Most High would look upon me with the look of pleasure

To hope that Allah Most High would number me amongst those who are beloved to Him,

To hope that Allah Most High would number me amongst those who sought knowledge

To unite the Ummah of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him)

To implement the Prophetic message

To hold on to my Prophetic lineage of knowledge

To hope that Allah Most High would make me and my entire lineage till the Day of Judgement to be from amongst the Righteous, amongst the Beloved, and amongst those whom He has granted freedom and liberation in this life and in the Hereafter.

O Allah, hear my plea, hear my prayer, and make it so! (Allahumma Ameen)

Conclusion

The Companion ‘Umar bin Khattab (Allah be pleased with him) has reported that the Holy Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) said, “intention determines the worth of a person’s actions and that he will attain what he intends.” (Riyadh-us Saleheen Arabic-English Vol.1, 2009)

May Allah guide the hearts and intentions of all students of knowledge along the Straight Path; the Path whom He has favored and not the Path of those who earn His anger, nor of those who go astray. 

 

Video of Live and Learn class

 

 

Biography of Shaykh Ieasha Prime

Ieasha Prime is a traditional Islamically trained educator, activist and public speaker.  She studied Arabic and Qur’an at the Fajr Institute followed by general Islamic studies in Cairo, Egypt.  After two years in Egypt, she moved to Hadramaut, Yemen and enrolled in Dar al Zahra, an Islamic University for Women. There, she studied Aqeedah, Qur’an, Hadith, Arabic, Jurisprudence (Fiqh), Islamic law, Purification of the Heart and other religious related learning. Her lineage of scholarship from whom she received direct education can be traced directly back to the Holy Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings be upon him) from the Husseini lineage. 

Under the tutelage of her professors, she has established several circles of knowledge and continues to teach and lecture across the United States of America and beyond. Her passion is educating and empowering Muslim women to be leaders. She is the Executive Director of Barakah Inc, a community based organization empowering women and youth with a foundation of Islam. 

Further details can be found on this link http://www.ieashaprime.com/about-her.html

 

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Always free.

The Power of Intention -Turning the Mundane into Sacred

“The Power of Intention – Turning the Mundane into Sacred” – Friday Reminder

Imam Yama Niazi

The Best of Actions and the Purest in the Sight of your Lord

In one hadith, the Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) told the companions, “shall I guide you to an action that is the best of all actions the purest in the sight of your Lord and one that raises your rank and is better than you spending in the way of Allah through gold and silver and better that you should meet your enemies in battle that they strike you and you strike them?” 

They said, “Indeed oh Messenger of Allah! Tell us what is this great action!” He said, “the remembrance (dhikr) of Allah Most High.”

Indeed in another hadith qudsi – a hadith in which the prophet (peace and blessings upon him) mentioned what Allah says – he said: “I am as my servant thinks of me and I am with him when he remembers me. If he remembers me to himself I will remember him to myself. And if he remembers me in a group or gathering I shall remember him in a group and gathering better than theirs.” Meaning: the gathering of the great angels in the heavens.

Allah tells us in the Qur’an “remember me and I shall remember you.” (2:152)

 

The Essence of our Religion

In essence, our religion revolves around the verse from surah Fatiha (1:4), “You alone O Lord do we worship and You alone we ask for help.”

We’re with Allah in this world, we’re with Allah in the next world, we’re with Allah in our grave and we’re with Allah in our hereafter on the Day of Judgment – all that we do is about pleasing our Lord Allah.

 

Turning the Mundane into Sacred

Now remembering Allah often doesn’t entail that we sit from morning to evening and just recite the Qur’an or make remembrance (dhikr) all day long. Though wouldn’t that be wonderful? However, we cannot do that all day long. We have obligations towards our families, towards our parents, we have jobs, we have school and we have a lot of different things that we tend to on a daily basis. However, there is a way to convert all of these mundane simple acts, and make them sacred, make them pleasing to our Lord and Creator Allah Most High.

As when ‘Aisha (Allah be pleased with her) described the messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him), she said, “he used to remember Allah in all of his states.” 

So how can we remember Allah? 

 

The Key to Transformation

We remember Allah through every action that we do. Ask yourself before you do an action, “is this for the sake of Allah? How did the Prophet (peace and blessings upon him) do this? What does the sacred law (shari’a) say about this action that I’m doing?”
For example, you’re going to go to the market to bring some food for your family. You can just get in the car, go to the store and just come back and never have thought about Allah. 

Or, as you leave your home you say, “I intend by going to the market to bring permissible (halal) provisions to feed my family as this is an obligation upon me. Therefore I seek your pleasure and your acceptance and your reward.” Then you go for the sake of Allah while making sure you bring everything that is permissible (halal) and good. This becomes rewarding for you! Even when we go to sleep at night; we intend to rest our bodies so that we can wake up and worship later whether it be through prayer or things like providing for our families.

Even when we go to work – we intend the pleasure of Allah. “I’m going to go seek the permissible (halal) provision for myself and my family and to support myself.” This is rewarded and this is a sacred act. There is nothing that doesn’t become sacred if it is for Allah Most High. All of this becomes sacred, all of this becomes rewarded.

 

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Making The Intention For Ghusl

Question: Does one need an intention in ghusl if there is more than one cause for the obligation of the ghusl?

Answer:

In the Name of Allah, the Most Merciful and Compassionate

In the Hanafi school, the intention of the ritual bath (ghusl) is an emphasized sunna and should not be left [Tahtawi/Shurunbulali, Hashiyat Maraqi al-Falah].

However, due to the purport of the texts and the nature of the ghusl being a means and not an end, the intention is not a condition for validity – even though it is a condition in order to attain the reward of the actions [Shurunbulali, Maraqi al-Falah].

This ruling applies regardless of the factor which obligated the ghusl. Whether it be the emission of sperm or the ending of menstruation, one ghusl suffices all of the above – even if one did not make an intention.

Hope this helps.

Allah knows best
[Shaykh] Yusuf Weltch

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Shaykh Yusuf Weltch is a graduate from Tarim; a student of Habib Umar and other luminaries; and authorized teachers of the Qur’an and the Islamic sciences

Combining two intentions in one act of worship

Question: When can one merge two acts of worship in one?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important question.

The default is that each act of worship is independent and requires an independent intention.

That said sometimes one act of worship subsumes another, such as prayer and prostration. One doesn’t need to intend prostration because it is subsumed within the prayer that one already intended.

Sometimes two acts of worship are indeed separate but one fulfills the other in its general sense. For example, the sunna of praying upon entering a mosque can be fulfilled by any prayer, sunna, or obligatory because the point is just not sitting down. The sunna of praying upon entering a mosque is in reality just a product of the prohibition of entering a mosque and sitting down without praying, so it is not sought of in and of itself and can be fulfilled by any prayer. (Tuhfat al Muhtaj, Ibn Hajar; al Majmu al Mudhahhab fi Qawaid al Madhhab, Alai; al Qawaid al Fiqhiyya, Saqqaf)

Other times the question is whether or not both of the actions are sought of in and of themselves. Fasting in Shawwal, for example, is considered an independent sunna that is specifically recommended. Some scholars were of the opinion that it is not a specific sunna, but rather a general recommendation to fast any six days in the month after Ramadan that could be fulfilled by make-ups, fasting on Mondays and Thursdays or any other fast. (Tuhfat al Muhtaj, Ibn Hajar; al Qawaid al Fiqhiyya, Saqqaf)

Then there is joining an act of worship with a worldly intention… For example, someone wants to lose weight and by fasting, so they join a generally recommended or generally obligatory intention of losing weight with a specific act of worship and get both rewards. (al Qawaid al Fiqhiyya, Saqqaf)

So whenever an action is subsumed within another, an action is not recommended in a specific sense, it is often possible to merge two intentions in one act of worship.

I pray this helps.

Farid

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language

Is Sin Disbelief?

Answered by Ustadh Farid Dingle

Question: Does deeming a sin “understandable” under certain circumstances constitute disbelief [ridda]?

Answer: Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Thank you for your important and valued question.

Deeming something clearly haram to be halal is only disbelief if it is tantamount to denying the message of Islam. That is to say, someone knows that Allah has forbidden pork, for example, and then that person decides that pork is actually permissible to eat, and the message of Islam is wrong.

Whenever there is some ambiguity about the circumstance or the intent of the words or deeds, it cannot be looked at as apostasy.

Please see: Is removing Hijab and Make-Up a Form of Apostasy?

I pray this helps.

[Ustadh Farid Dingle]

Checked and Approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

Ustadh Farid Dingle has completed extensive years of study in the sciences of the Arabic language and the various Islamic Sciences. During his studies, he also earned a CIFE Certificate in Islamic Finance. Over the years he has developed a masterful ability to craft lessons that help non-Arabic speakers gain a deep understanding of the language. He currently teaches courses in the Arabic Language.

Islamic Time Management: The Ultimate Hack in Islam (Part 2) – Sidi Tushar Imdad

The Ultimate Hack in Islam

Last week, we discovered that the greatest hack in Islam is undoubtedly the niyyah or intention.

Today, I want to explore three innovative ways in which you can utilise this amazing gift from Allah. I’m pretty sure some of these techniques will be new to you.

1. Start intending for mundane actions
As mentioned in the previous article, possibly 95% of our actions are outside formal ritual worship. How long does it actually take to pray our 5 daily prayers? Perhaps 1-2 hours a day if we include wudhu and going to the masjid for some prayers.

That leaves over 20 hours which could be wasted – if we neglect our intentions.

Most of this can be covered in 3 areas:
a) Sleep – around 8 hours a day. Don’t forget the Sunnah du’as and then INTEND that you are following the Sunnah of giving your body rest so it can better worship Allah when you wake.

b) Work – whether at the office, for your business or at home – again around 8 hours a day. When you set out to work, or at the start of your first task of the day make an intention then. E.g. ‘Ya Allah, I intend this work to serve my family and free me from begging from others.’

c) Family – around 3-4 hours morning and evening. When you see your spouse/child after a hard day of work, intend that you will love them, help them, teach them and guide them to worship Allah.

2. Global Intention
Not many Muslims have heard of this one. At the beginning of the day, make an intention for all the things you will do that day. I like to do this at Salat ul-Duha time and read a du’a like: ‘Rabbi taqabbal min-ni, hayaati, mamaati wa kulli a’amaali’ (My Lord! Accept from me my life, my death and all my works). In a few weeks, inshaAllah, I will be sharing some du’as like this which I recommend for your Morning Routine.

This hack saves you from having to remember to intend before every single action.

3. Multiple Intentions
Finally, another great way to earn multiple rewards for the same action is to make multiple intentions. For example, when you are relaxing with your family in the evenings, you can intend (a) strengthening family ties, (b) bringing happiness to the heart of a believer, (c) rest and refreshment as a recharge to do more ibaadah later. That’s three for one!

One of my teachers mentioned that the more one studies with the ‘ulema and the more sacred knowledge one has, the more intentions you will learn. Anyone who has studied fiqh with a trained ‘alim can attest to this!

For example, In Shaykh Aydarus’ wonderful little book ‘The Book of Intentions’ he gives 7 detailed intentions just for visiting a friend! And 18 for business/trading (will definitely post that on LinkedIn!).

What about getting to 100X or 700X reward? Well that depends on the strength and purity of one’s intention as well as the purity of one’s heart. There have been great figures in our history who could perform miracles through reciting the Fatiha alone. The method to get to that level is beyond my expertise and we all need to sit in the company of righteous scholars for such spiritual knowledge.

But we can ALL improve the quantity and quality of our intentions. So avoid shooting blanks and make sure you are maximising the reward and potential of Allah’s good pleasure by 1) intending for mundane actions like sleeping, eating, etc.; 2) make a global intention at the start of each day; and 3) make multiple intentions as much as you can to gain multiplied reward!!

If you enjoyed this article, you can sign up to Tushar’s mailing list for his weekly Jum’a articles, free content about Islamic Time Management as well as updates for exciting courses or services: https://mailchi.mp/5879bd7982eb/tusharimdad


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  
 
A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   
 
Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in  productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included  ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.


Islamic Time Management (1) : The Ultimate Hack in Islam – Sidi Tushar Imdad

The Ultimate Hack in Islam

Did you know that any good deed you do could be rewarded anywhere between one, to 10X, to 700X or ‘even more’?

Two people could both be working at a task, let’s say writing a report for work. One gets the reward of 1 and another gets 700!

The reality could be even more extreme. One person could be getting a NEGATIVE, by committing a sin through this report (for example, by recommending a haram transaction) and the other could be getting MILLIONS of hasanat (good deeds) for the same amount of effort.

The reason for the difference is the ultimate hack in Islam. And it’s something we all know, but seldom utilize to its INFINITE potential.

I’m talking about INTENTION (niyyah).

In one of the most foundational hadiths of the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace), we learn that ‘Actions are judged according to their intentions.’

Now we all know that we must make an intention before fasting, or getting married, or praying a particular salah. But do we make strong intentions for all the other actions which make up 95% of our time?

Imagine, if you knew a friend doing the same job as you. You both put in the same hours, the same effort and actually do the same thing. Yet you get paid £10/hr and she gets paid £100,000/hr! Talk about not meeting your potential! You’d feel utterly cheated, squandered and robbed of your time, right?

Well this could be happening to us right now! Imagine if for 95% of our time – our sleep, our eating, our 8-10 hours of daily work – we were only gaining 1 or even 0 good deeds (because we had no intention – just going through the motions). When we could have been gaining 700X for all of these same deeds!

The bottom line: if you don’t actively make good intentions then you are literally firing blanks on most of your days, most of your nights and most of your life.

The good news? This incredible gift from Allah is the most powerful hack imaginable as it means you can gain tens, hundreds and even 1000X more profit in this world and the next – with the same deed.

Think of it as the amount of return on investment (ROI) for your deeds. Someone puts £1 in a bank and it stays the same. Another person invests it into a halal enterprise and gains £1000s from the same £1.

You can do this with your deeds, and it’s much more valuable than money.

Now the question remains, HOW do you ensure a deed gets 10X or 100X or 700X or more?

That’s too much to answer for now, but it requires an understanding of the issues of QUANTITY and QUALITY of intentions – in order to cover all your bases. We’ll look into that in the next installment of this mini-series on ‘The Ultimate Hack in Islam’.

This is the type of knowledge what I term ‘Islamic Time Management’. It’s priceless and that’s why I’m so passionate about it.

If you enjoyed this article, you can sign up to Tushar’s mailing list for his weekly Jum’a articles, free content about Islamic Time Management as well as updates for exciting courses or services: https://mailchi.mp/5879bd7982eb/tusharimdad


Biography:
Tushar Imdad (aka Tushar Mohammed Imdad-ul-Haque Bhuiya) is an Islamic Time Management Coach and Educational Entrepreneur. Professionally trained as a high school English teacher, Tushar has taught or managed prominent Islamic schools in Leicester, UK, between 2007-2016. With a flair for managing multiple roles, Tushar is also a GCSE English examiner, a teacher trainer for AMS UK; professional proofreader; former lead instructor at Madrasa Manara; and is currently the Director of Shaykhspeare’s Online English Academy and High Impact Tutors.  
 
A long-term student of knowledge, Tushar has studied a range of Islamic sciences at the feet of scholars such as Shaykh Nuh Keller, Umm Sahl, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani, Maulana Ilyas Patel and Ustadh Tabraze Azam. In 2015 he completed Level 5 of the Classical Arabic Program from the prestigious Qasid Institute, Amman.   
 
Throughout his varied career, Tushar has always been driven by a passion for time management. Starting in 2009, he has delivered a mixture of workshops, webinars, web-coaching and client visits, attracting delegates as varied as CEOs, corporate professionals, housewives, dentists and scholars from places spanning the UK, US and Middle East. Tushar has published articles and delivered training for ProductiveMuslim.com, SeekersGuidance.org and Qibla.com (now Kiflayn). In recent years he has immersed himself in  productivity systems, learning from world-class experts such as Demir Bentley, the authors of The One Thing, Leo Babuta and James Clear. His recent courses have included  ‘Principles of Islamic Time Management’, ‘Time Tactics 101’ and ‘The Breakthrough Habit’.

What is a Right Intention?

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

What is a right Intention?

For example, I clothe myself because I do not want to be ashamed by people. When I say to myself that I clothe myself because I want to cover my awrah (because of Allah) I do not believe myself because I know that if Allah would not deem it haram I would still cover myself.

How can someone have multiple intentions?

Allah says: “Then perhaps you would kill yourself through grief over them, [O Muhammad], if they do not believe in this message, [and] out of sorrow.”
Can you explain to me this Ayah? Isn’t it the case here that the prophet had grief over them merely because they would get the punishment by Allah?

Answer: Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

Embryonic stages of worship

The word for intention in Arabic is linguistically related to the word seed (nawa). Allah Most High tells us in the Quran how he makes the seed to come out. [6: 95] He also bring out our intentions and brings them to full fruition.

The issue of intention is so fundamental because it is the topic of why we do what we do: what drives us in every moment we live.

Specific intentions

Specific good intentions are there to change the bad motives we have within us so that we can move towards having one universal good intention: Allah alone.

We use intentions such helping the poor, fulfilling our obligations to others, or avoiding the Hell-Fire, to turn our heart again and again to Allah. Bit by bit the various disperate and sometimes contradictory intentions become one drive to please and thank Allah.

For example, someone wants to put on some clothes. One reason is because they look nice and they want people to see them: a bad intention; another reason is because they want to avoid the Hell-Fire by covering their nakedness in public; yet another is to fulfill the sunna of beautification; and still another is to enjoy Allah’s blessings, by wearing really nice clothes. This last one almost seems to conflict with the first, and also conflict with the shyness and humility this person feels before Allah.

In this myriad of motives and reasons, the job of selecting very specific and pure intentions is paramount: Hell and Paradise are equidistant from such a person as he wrestles with the good and bad within him.

Universal intentions

Over time and with persistent effort, the heart turns more and more towards Allah and all the various and multifaceted intentions become subsumed within one drive to please and know and worship Allah. Allah becomes the Kaaba of his heart. As Saadi put it:

O man of God, take the way of God;
O man of God, take to the Kaaba of divine good-pleasure.

Someone like this can join between more than one intention just like someone who breathes can join between the use of many, many muscles in one natural process.

Dying for grief

The Prophet (Allah bless him and grant him peace) loved Allah and loved his nation and suffered indescribable pains in his work to guide each and every one of those he was sent to. This compassion and concern is what we have to take away from the verse.

As for the explanation of the verse, some scholars have understood it to mean that Allah asked the Prophet as a rhetorical question telling him not to be sad. Others have said that it a phrase of comfort and support. (al-Alusi)

I pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed. 

Is It Necessary to Intend to Recite Each Verses of the Fatiha? [ Shafi’i ]

Answered by Shaykh Farid Dingle

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Is it necessary to intend to recite each verses of the Fatiha?

How to deal with involuntary semen leakage?

How to know if I have an excuse regarding wudu for prayer?

Answer: Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuh,

Dear questioner,

It is not necessary to intent reciting the Fatiha. The intention at the beginning of the prayer covers the intentions for following integrals.

As for semen leakage, if it is something occasional, such as every other day, then you must make ghusl if it comes out.

As for when it becomes something intolerable, such as when it starts to occur regularly at work then you can just follow the Maliki school and ignore it. The rule in the Maliki school is that if the impurities exit unpredictably and irregularly during most or all of the prayer times the ruling is that it does not require wudu or ghusl. [Dardir, Sharh Saghir] The same would apply to gas or urine.

Please also see this answer.

I pray this helps.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Farid Dingle

Shaykh Farid Dingle grew up in a convert family in Herefordshire, UK. In 2007, he moved to Jordan to pursue traditional studies. Shaykh Farid continues to live in Amman, Jordan with his wife and kids. In addition to continuing his studies he teaches Arabic and several of the Islamic sciences.

Shaykh Farid began his journey in sacred knowledge with intensives in the UK and Jordan (2004) in Shafi’i fiqh and Arabic. After years of studying Arabic grammar, Shafi’i fiqh, hadith, legal methodology (usul al-fiqh) and tafsir, Sh. Farid began specializing in Arabic language and literature. Sh. Farid studied Pre-Islamic poetry, Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, and Andalusian literature. He holds a BA in Arabic Language and Literature and continues exploring the language of the Islamic tradition.

In addition to his interest in the Arabic language Shaykh Farid actively researches matters related to jurisprudence (fiqh) which he studied with Shaykh Hamza Karamali, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, and continues with Shaykh Amjad Rasheed.