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Valid Make Up Fasts

Ustadh Farid Dingle clarifies the rulings on making up fasts, intentions and actions, and reward from Allah, according to the Shafi‘i madhhab.

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I became Muslim during the month of Ramadan 2012. When I became Muslim I was not told to fast so out of ignorance I didn’t fast that Ramadan. As time went on and I began to learn more I realized I had to make these days up. At the time I decided to start making them up I was under the impression that I had to fast 2 consecutive months for each day missed. When I started to study (Shafi‘i) fiqh I found this to be incorrect. I had already fasted about a month consecutively before I found out the ruling and stopped, would this time I fasted count at all towards my make ups? Or is it invalid because the ruling wasn’t carried out correctly? Please advise.

Jazak Allah khayr

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

In the Shafi‘i school, that wouldn’t count because the intention was to expiate and not to make-up the fast. This is because of the hadith, ‘Actions are only by intentions.’ [Bukhari and Muslim]

That said, you would get the reward for fasting a whole month regardless, even if it didn’t technically count as the obligatory fasts. Allah Most High says, ‘So He answered them saying, ‘Never will I allow to be lost the work of [any] worker among you, whether male or female.’ [3:195]

So, just work out exactly how many days of Ramadan 2012 you have to make them up, and just make them up before this coming Ramadan, even if not consecutively. Try to get them done soon as the days are still short, which makes it much easier.

I pray this helps.

Farid

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


 

Intentions Purely for Allah

Ustadh Salman Younas explains how one can improve one’s intentions and how to make them purely for the sake of Allah.

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

How do I know that I am doing things for God? How do I set my intentions?

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assaalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Being sincere in our actions – especially religious ones – is something we are commanded with in the Qur’an: “They have not been commanded except to worship God, sincerely devoting their religion to Him.” (98:5)

Imam al-Ghazali describes sincerity as “the purification of an an action from all blemishes… until the goal is exclusively to draw nearer to God with no other motive.” (Ihya’ Ulum al-Din) This can only arise from someone who constantly opposes the desires of his self, is well-acquainted with the ruses of the devil, loves God, and solely concentrates on the Hereafter such that the world is no longer desirable to him.

This particular degree of sincerity is extremely lofty and rare. Indeed, Sah al-Tustari when asked what was the most difficult thing for the self replied, “Sincerity, because the self has not share in it.” (al-Qushayri, al-Risala) For most, our acts of worship are admixed with intentions and motivations that are not god-centered. Some of these are apparent and easy to detect, while others are more subtle. Thus, for example, acting religious in order to impress a prospective spouse is clear ostentation. On the other hand, take the example of a person whose public acts of worship are sounder and better than when he is in private. He feels ashamed at such a discrepancy between his actions in front of people and when he is alone. So, he strives to make sure his private actions are just as good. This is a blemish on his sincerity since he pays heed to people and rectifies his private acts to feel better about his public ones.

Even though the rank of true sincerity is difficult to attain, this is not meant to discourage the believer in striving to attain it. God is merciful and aware of our limitations, our efforts, and sincerity. He will judge us based on our sincere efforts. Some practical steps we can take to ensure our intentions are pure:

(i) Ask God for sincerity in all of your actions. The core of sincerity is returning to God in all matters.

(ii) Exercise self-vigilance over your actions. One of the approaches recommended by some of my teachers is the ‘what/why/who’ approach. Before every action, ask yourself what you are doing, why you are doing it, and for whom it is being done. Keep at this and it will become second nature to be more aware of one’s actions and the motivations that underlay them.

(iii) Keep reminding yourself of death and the hereafter in order to diminish the value of this world.

(iv) Have a steady routine of good works that you do and especially works that no one is aware of. As Imam al-Qushayri mentioned, “Sincerity is to protect one’s actions from being observed by people. It is also true that sincerity means pious concealment [of one’s good deeds] from being observed by people.” (al-Risala)

(v) Always consider your deeds as imperfect and seek God’s repentance. Boasting and being proud of one’s actions even to ones self alone is a sign that it not fully sincere.

(vi) Surround yourself with people who keep your intentions in check and motivate you to oppose your self.

Salman

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


 

Constantly Skipping Prayers

Shaykh Jamir Meah offers counsel on how to establish prayer, to make up missed prayers, and how to deal with emotional stumbling blocks.

 

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I have been suffering from this problem for years. It is the worst problem in my life and I’m very scared. I have tried so many times not to skip any of the obligatory prayers but to no avail, even in the month of Ramadan. Sometimes I will write down the prayers that I missed and pay them back, but it will keep piling up. Then I will leave it and start fresh saying to myself, “I won’t skip it again,” but I always do.

I am so emotional and I become easily sad too. When i am sad I feel lazy and don’t offer prayers. I feel bad all the time when I miss or skip prayers, but I still do. I can go a full day without a single prayer. I am so scared because I know the great sin I have been committing by not offering my prayers, and I know if I don’t rectify this problem and die with it, then I will be in serious trouble on Judgement Day. Please what do I do? Please help me.

 

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

While the prayers are serious obligations, they are also meant to be the “comfort” of the believer’s eyes. They are by no means meant to be torturous!

Current Prayers

Simply pray your daily prayers on time, preferably as soon as the adhan goes off. Pray in congregation at the mosque at each opportunity. If it is overwhelming, stick to the obligatory prayers for now.
Also, when you make wudu, do it with high resolve and remind yourself that you are washing your limbs from sins and heedlessness and preparing yourself to stand in front of your Creator.

Make Up Prayers

While you must make these up, you need to be realistic in how you go about it. Make a daily schedule for them and stick to it, even if you make up one day’s prayer each day.
Please also refer to these answers: Missing Prayers Archives.

State of Mind

In regards your emotions and sadness, it is imperative that this is addressed. Please do consult a therapist that you feel comfortable with to help you work through and resolve the root causes behind these. This will help you with how you get on with prayers, Insha Allah.
Also, seek out good company, stay away from all forms of sins, from distractions; such as too much entertainment, even if lawful. Read the Qur’an daily, get involved in community work, social hobbies, and take care of what you eat, the exercise you get, the amount of sleep you get, and go to sleep early.
I pray the above helps.

Warmest salams,

Jamir

 

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.

 


 

 

 

Intention for Seeking Knowledge by Imam Haddad

In this article, Shaykh Faraz Rabbani provides commentary on Imam Haddad’s famous “Intention for Seeking Knowledge.” Text and translation of this supplication is also provided.

In the Name of Allah, the Merciful and Compassionate.

The Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace, said, “Actions are by their intentions, and each person shall have whatsoever they intended.” (Bukhari and Muslim)

The reality of our actions is not merely what we do, but also why we do it. As Ibn Ata’illah explained, “Actions are lifeless forms, whose soul is the subtle reality of sincerity within them.” (Hikam al Ata’iyya)

Seeking Knowledge as a Spiritual Work

Seeking sacred knowledge (talab al-ilm) has been described in the Qur’an and Sunna as one of the highest of spiritual works. Thus, a sincere intention is particularly important.

Seeking knowledge can also be a source of honor and recognition in this world. This can be dangerous, as it can result in sinful inward traits such as pride, conceit, and arrogance. Only sincere intentions can protect a person, and fulfill the spiritual potential of seeking knowledge.

What is an Intention?

The scholars explain that an intention (niyya) is, “The resolve to (a) perform an act of obedience to Allah, (b) drawing closer to Allah thereby, (c) at the beginning of one’s action.” (Taftazani, quoted by Ibn Abidin, Radd al-Muhtar)

This has three components:
(a) “The resolve to perform an act of obedience” entails mindful, purposeful action. Bring to mind what are you doing, and that you are doing it as an act of obedience.
(b)“ … drawing closer to Allah…” entails bringing to mind that you are acting for the sake of Allah alone – seeking His Closeness, Love, Good Pleasure, and reward.
(c) “… at the beginning of the action,” entails pausing for a moment before you begin any action, at any time, in order to renew your resolve.

What is Sincerity?

Sincerity, or ikhlas, is the heart of Islam. It is defined by the scholars as, “Seeking to draw closer to Allah with one’s actions, without any ulterior motive.” (Qushayri)

Sahl ibn Abd Allah said, “The intelligent looked at sincerity, and the best description they found is that it is for one’s motions and rest – in private and in public – to be for Allah alone without partner, without anything being mixed into one’s motives. Not one’s ego, nor one’s whims, nor any merely worldly aspirations.” (Bayhaqi, Shu‘ab al-Iman)

Imam Haddad’s Intention for Knowledge: A Practical Means for Making High Intentions

Part of having sincere intentions (al-niyya al-saliha) is to reflect deeply on all the multiple ways one is seeking the Pleasure of Allah through one’s actions. This is called “multiplying one’s intention,” or ta’addud al-niyya.

Because such deep reflection is rare for most of us, the scholars compiled statements of intention to help us make high, transformative intentions before we act.

One such powerful statement of intention for seeking knowledge is Imam Abd Allah ibn Alawi al-Haddad’s “Intention for Seeking Sacred Knowledge.”

This intention defines both the ultimate purpose of seeking knowledge – “seeking Allah Himself, His Good Pleasure, Closeness, and Reward” –  as well as the multiple ways one can make one’s knowledge sincerely for Allah.

The scholars encourage making it a deliberate, purposeful habit to make such a statement of intention – in one’s heart or uttered – every time one begins studying, teaching, reading, or listening to Islamic knowledge.

Imam Haddad’s Intention for Seeking Knowledge


 

Strengthening One’s Aspiration

Ustadh Tabraze Azam answers a question about a constant feeling of discouragement in studies and how to strengthen one’s aspiration.

Question:

Assalam alaykum wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

Sometimes I get discouraged because I feel like when I move one step forward in my studies, I feel like I also jump ten steps back. In other words, I’ll learn something new and it will stick with me like glue, but my memory is so weak that the old material loses its strength.

This is very discouraging for me. Even one of my teachers noticed it today. I feel like I am wasting their time. Alongside consistently reviewing, are there other steps that I can take to help my memory? And general advice to help maintain my himma (aspiration) even when things get rough?

Answer:

Wa alaykum assalam wa rahmat Allah wa barakatuh.

I hope you are in the best of health and spirits, insha Allah.

Sidi Ibn Ata’illah al Iskandari said, “No matter is difficult if you seek it through your Lord, and nothing is easy if you seek it through yourself.”

Difficult times are to be expected. This is the dunya. However, with patience, perseverance, and a little realization, there is always a way out.

Allah Most High says:

And whoever is mindful of Allah, He will grant them a way out, and will provide for them in ways unimagined. And whoever places their trust in Allah, then Allah is their sufficiency. Allah’s affair will surely come to pass, and Allah has made a clear decree for everything. (Sura al Talaq 65:2-3)

Realize this and take the best possible means of attaining unto the goal. Consult more often regarding how and what you should review. What steps should you be taking to really benefit from the knowledge? How does it relate to other topics/subjects? Try to study/review with other students. And do everything you can to cement the material down.

Make a point to renew your intentions, seek forgiveness for yourself, parents, family, fellow students, teachers, and the entire umma, give a little in charity, strive to consistently fulfill all of your obligations, pray out of neediness, ask in blessed times and places with focus, sincerity, and conviction that you will be answered, and finally be grateful for what you already have. Allah Most High says:

If you are thankful, I will surely increase you. (Sura Ibrahim 14:7)

With time and sincerity, it will come, insha Allah. The Messenger of Allah, Allah bless him and give him peace, reminded us to seek the assistance of Allah and not to deem ourselves incapable.

And Allah alone gives success.

Wassalam,

Tabraze Azam

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani.


How to Deal with Doubts About the Intention in Wudu? (Shafi’i)

Answered by Shaykh Jamir Meah

Question: Assalamu alaykum

When I make wudu, I have the intention of making the whole wudu (sunnan and fard aspects) in mind without necessarily utter the itention. Then before I wash my hands as a sunnah I say the basmalla or during washing the hands. But then before or during washing my face I don´t say anything.

Does it suffice that I say the basmalla before or during making the sunnah of washing the hands and that I know that I doing the fard after washing the hands and rinsing mouth and nose?

Answer: Wa’alaykum assalam, thank you for your question.

The Basmalah

It is a sunna to say the Basmalah at the beginning of wudu, but not obligatory. The minimal is to say ‘Bismillah’, while the optimal is to say ‘Bismillah al Rahman al Rahim’.

One says the Basmalah when starting wudu, so if one is starts with the sunna act of washing the hands, then one says it then, or if starting with the integral of washing the face, then one first says the Basmalah and then makes the intention of wudu while simultaneously beginning to wash the face.

If one does not say the Basmalah at the beginning of wudu, they can say it anytime during the wudu. When one says it during wudu, one may say, بِسْمِ اللهِ فِي أَوَّلِهِ وَآخِرِهِ, meaning, ‘In the name of Allah in its beginning and end.’

Intention in the Shafi’i school

Intentions are obligatory to intend in the heart and sunna to say with the tongue. Typical forms of the intention for someone in a state of minor ritual impurity are:

I intend to lift minor ritual impurity
I intend obligatory wudu
I intend purification for prayer

One of the general conditions of intentions is that it’s time occurs simultaneously with the act. In wudu, the intention is made simultaneously with the first obligatory act of wudu, which is washing the face.

If one ‘knows’ in their mind that they are making obligatory wudu, or lifting minor ritual impurity at the point of washing the face, then the intention is valid.

However, if one intended at the point of washing the face simply ‘I intend a fard act of wudu’ or one simply ‘knows’ one is doing a fard act, then according to our school this would not be a valid intention and therefore, the wudu and any acts performed with it would not be valid. Unfortunately, this seems to be the case in the situation you have described.

[Hashiyat al Bajuri, Bushra al Karim]

Waswasa

There is a fine line between not practicing correctly and suffering from waswasa. If this is a recurring theme and you are constantly having doubts about intentions, then you may be suffering from waswasa. If this is the case, then ignore the doubts and try your best to move on and not dwell on whether your intentions are valid or not. Please also refer to this article:

A Reader on Waswasa (Baseless Misgivings)

Taking an opinion outside of the school

If you are convinced that your wudu and worship have not been valid, and it will be too difficult for you to make up those prayers, then you can take the opinion of the Hanafi school that intention is not obligatory to make for wudu and ghusl. [Quduri]

If you are suffering from waswasa, then take this valid opinion from the Hanafi school, as it will put a stop to it insha’Allah. However, please do check with a Hanafi scholar in regards the integrals of wudu in their school.

Training yourself to make the intention

In the meantime, train yourself to make the intention according to our school. You may do this by writing and sticking a note on the door or place where you make wudu to remind you, or by going very slowly when making the first steps of wudu, until it becomes second nature.

Warmest salams,
[Shaykh] Jamir Meah

Shaykh Jamir Meah grew up in Hampstead, London. In 2007, he traveled to Tarim, Yemen, where he spent nine years studying the Islamic sciences on a one-to-one basis under the foremost scholars of the Ribaat, Tarim, with a main specialization and focus on Shafi’i fiqh. In early 2016, he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continues advanced studies in a range of Islamic sciences, as well as teaching. Jamir is a qualified homeopath.

Ramadan Intentions – Ustadh Abdul Muhaymin

In this video, Ustadh Abdul Muhaymin encourages us to have a list of intentions for our fasts, as well as a list of duas we recite frequently.

He mentions that Ramadan is a time in which we should step up our game. We should try to make this month a transformative one. A good way to do this, is to have some intentions and duas that we review every day.

In addition, we should do our best to bring in good habits and get rid of bad ones. One way to could accomplish this, is to look at our goals from last Ramadan. If we were not able to accomplish these, we could make an effort to strengthen them this Ramadan. If we did have goals that we were able to successfully implement, then this Ramadan we could add to that goal and try something new.


With gratitude to Tayba Foundation.


 

Does the Intention of Breaking the Prayer Invalidate It?

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Assalamu alaykum

Does the intention of breaking the prayer or thinking about breaking the prayer invalidate it?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

I pray you are well.

No; thinking about invalidating the prayer, or even intending to do so does not invalidate it. Just like with a fast, to invalidate a prayer you must actually perform a particular action. These actions range from speaking to invalidating one’s wudu (Shurunbulalai;Maraqi al-falah)

I recommend that you study the laws of purification and prayer. These are matters which recur often so it is best to stay on top of them through study and reviewing what one learns.

May Allah bless you with the best of both worlds.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 to study and sit at the feet of some of the most erudite scholars of our time.

Over the following eighteen months he studied a traditional curriculum, studying with scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish.

In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years, in Fiqh, Usul al-Fiqh, Theology, Hadith Methodology and Commentary, Shama’il, and Logic with teachers such as Dr Ashraf Muneeb, Dr Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr Mansur Abu Zina amongst others. He was also given two licences of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabr and Shaykh Yahya Qandil.

His true passion, however, arose in the presence of Shaykh Ali Hani, considered by many to be one of the foremost tafsir scholars of our time who provided him with the keys to the vast knowledge of the Quran. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic Sciences, Tafsir, Arabic Grammar, and Rhetoric.

When he finally left Jordan for the UK in 2014, Shaykh Ali gave him his distinct blessing and still recommends students in the UK to seek out Shaykh Abdul-Rahim for Quranic studies. Since his return he has trained as a therapist and has helped a number of people overcome emotional and psychosomatic issues. He is a keen promoter of emotional and mental health.

How Should I Go About Establishing an Intention for My Prayer?

Answered by Shaykh Umer Mian

Question: Assalamu alaykum

1. There are so many rulings about how the intention should be done. How should I go about it?

2. How does someone even raise his hands and says “Allahu akbar” without knowing what they’re doing?

3. How can I have a firm resolve to pray when there is doubt about my intention?

4. Where does the Prophet (Peace and blessings be upon him) mention all these things about intention?

Answer: Wa alaikum as-salam wa rahmatullahi wa barakatuhu

1. The rulings about intention are not very many. In fact, the matter is quite simple. Before prayer, bring to mind the following points:

1) Which prayer of the day you are praying. Is it Dhuhr or Asr, etc.?
2) Is it an obligatory prayer (fard/wajib) or non-obligatory (sunnah/nafl)?
3) Are you praying the current prayer or is it a makeup of a previous prayer? If it’s a makeup, which day’s makeup is it (e.g. yesterday’s Isha prayer, the day before yesterday’s Fajr prayer, etc.)?
4) Are you praying behind an imam or praying individually?

It is not necessary to verbalize these points—merely bringing them to mind is sufficient. However, verbalizing them may help focus the mind on what you’re about to do. For example, before Dhuhr prayer in the masjid, a person could say something to the effect of: “Oh Allah, I intend to pray the current fard of Dhuhr prayer behind this imam, so accept it from me.” This would be sufficient to achieve the “firm resolve” the scholars have spoken about. What contradicts “firm resolve” is to make a conditional intention. For example, one says, “If it’s currently Dhuhr time, I intend to pray Dhuhr prayer, but if it’s currently Asr time, I intend to pray Asr prayer.” This would be invalid. Instead, one must be sure of which prayer is being prayed. In addition, note that it is NOT required to specify the number of rakats one will be praying—specifying the points above is sufficient for the correctness of one’s prayer.

2. It could happen when someone makes a “conditional” intention which, as described above, is invalid. It could also happen when someone is teaching the performance of prayer. In this case, it’s conceivable that the person performs all the actions of the prayer without intending to actually pray, i.e. they were just demonstrating the prayer. Barring these unusual circumstances, you are correct that it is normally inconceivable for a Muslim to pray without having the minimum intention described above.

3. All you need to do is to bring to mind and/or verbalize the four points mentioned above. Do this before reciting takbiratul ihram (the initial “Allahu Akbar” that starts the prayer). If you do this as described, you have achieved firm resolve and don’t need to worry about anything else.

4. The rulings about intention derive directly from the following textual evidences:
a) “Worship at fixed times hath been enjoined on the believers” (Qur’an 4:103).
b) “Actions are only by intentions, and each person will only have that which he intended” (Bukhari and Muslim).
c) “Allah says: My servant does not draw near to me with anything more beloved to Me than the obligatory acts of worship. And my servant continues to draw near to Me with supererogatory acts of worship until I love him” (Bukhari).

Verse (a) above makes clear that each and every obligatory (fard and wajib) prayer is like an individual debt owed to Allah. This is more apparent in the original Arabic language of the verse, which describes each prayer like a written debt (kitaab) ascribed to a particular time (mawqut). A person who owes many different debts needs to specify which debt he’s repaying at any given time. Without specifying (intending), no particular debt can be deemed fulfilled. Therefore, based on the verse above (and many other evidences), the jurists of Islamic Sacred Law (al-fuqaha) have agreed by consensus that it is necessary to specify which obligatory prayer one is praying (source: al-Fiqh al-Islami wa Adillatuhu by Shaykh Wahba al-Zuhayli).

In addition, hadith (b) makes clear that reward from Allah is based on one’s intention. Hadith (c) above further clarifies that obligatory (fard and wajib) prayers have a degree of distinction over non-obligatory (sunnah and nafl) prayers. Hence, it follows that the obligatory prayers require an extra intention in order to attain their extra reward.

The rest of the details about intention given above are according to the Hanafi school of Sacred Law, and their evidences are clear in the books of the Hanafis. In your question, you mentioned the Shafi’i school. Is that the madhab you practice upon? If so, have you studied it with a qualified teacher? If you practice upon the Hanafi school, learn the rulings of that school from a qualified teacher and do not allow the rulings of other schools to confuse you. Islamic Sacred Law is extremely vast and mastering a single school is difficult enough, let alone trying to learn them all. For more, see the following articles:
Shaykh Murabtal Haaj’s Fatwa on Following One of the Four Accepted Madhhabs
What is a Madhhab? Why is it necessary to follow one? By Sh. Nuh Keller
Why Does One Have to Follow a Madhhab? By Sh. Nuh Keller
Why Muslims Follow Madhhabs? By Sh. Nuh Keller
Understanding The Four Madhhabs: The Problem with Anti-Madhhabism, By Sh. Abdal Hakim Murad

Finally, consider the following hadith:
“Verily wudu has a demon (assigned to it) and he is known as The Bewilderer (al-Walahaan). So beware his whisperings related to your purification” (Recorded by Tirmidhi and Ibn Majah).
Although this hadith speaks specifically about wudu (ablution), we know that wudu is one of the keys of prayer, just like intention. Therefore, it’s not unsurprising that many people have doubts and confusions regarding both wudu and intention. In order to overcome this, we should seek refuge in Allah and seek sacred knowledge from reliable, authentic sources.

Arabic source texts are below.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Umer Mian

إِنَّ الصَّلَاةَ كَانَتْ عَلَى الْمُؤْمِنِينَ كِتَابًا مَوْقُوتًا (سورة النساء، 103)

عن عُمَرَ بْنَ الْخَطَّابِ رَضِيَ اللَّهُ عَنْهُ عَلَى الْمِنْبَرِ قَالَ: قال رَسُولَ اللَّهِ صَلَّى اللَّهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّمَ: إِنَّمَا الْأَعْمَالُ بِالنِّيَّاتِ وَإِنَّمَا لِكُلِّ امْرِئٍ مَا نَوَى (متفق عليه)

عَنْ أَبِي هُرَيْرَةَ قَالَ قَالَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ صَلَّى اللَّهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّمَ إِنَّ اللَّهَ قَالَ مَا تَقَرَّبَ إِلَيَّ عَبْدِي بِشَيْءٍ أَحَبَّ إِلَيَّ مِمَّا افْتَرَضْتُ عَلَيْهِ وَمَا يَزَالُ عَبْدِي يَتَقَرَّبُ إِلَيَّ بِالنَّوَافِلِ حَتَّى أُحِبَّهُ (رواه البخاري)

تعيين المنوي: يشترط تعيين نوع الفرض الذي يصليه باتفاق الفقهاء، كالظهر أو العصر، لأن الفروض كثيرة، ولا يتأدى واحد منها بنية فرض آخر. ( الفِقْهُ الإسلاميُّ وأدلَّتُهُ للزحيلي)

وَعَنْ أُبَيِّ بْنِ كَعْبٍ رَضِيَ اللَّهُ عَنْهُ، عَنِ النَّبِيِّ صَلَّى اللَّهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّمَ قَالَ: ” «إِنَّ لِلْوُضُوءِ شَيْطَانًا يُقَالُ لَهُ: الْوَلَهَانُ، فَاتَّقُوا وَسْوَاسَ الْمَاءِ» “. رَوَاهُ التِّرْمِذِيُّ، وَابْنُ مَاجَهْ

Is My Prayer After Its Time Invalid If I Didn’t Have the Intention of Making It Up?

Answered by Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Question: Assalamu alaykum

I have come to find out there was a time where I have prayed outside of the prayer time thinking I still had time to pray. I prayed and did not make the intention for Qada (making up) since I didn’t know. Would my prayer be valid?

Answer: Wa ‘alaykum as-salam wa rahmatullah wa barakatuh

Thank you for your question.

You can assume that your prayers are valid. What is clear is that you will have had the intention to perform the Maghreb prayer of that day, and this is sufficient after the time has expired to be a valid intention for a qada prayer (Haskafi, al-Durr al-Mukhtar, Ibn Abidin, Radd al-Muhtar).

I recommend that you study the fiqh of prayer in in detail.

May Allah bless you with the best of both worlds.

Wassalam,
[Shaykh] Abdul-Rahim Reasat

Shaykh Abdul-Rahim Reasat began his studies in Arabic Grammar and Morphology in 2005. After graduating with a degree in English and History he moved to Damascus in 2007 to study and sit at the feet of some of the most erudite scholars of our time.

Over the following eighteen months he studied a traditional curriculum, studying with scholars such as Shaykh Adnan Darwish, Shaykh Abdurrahman Arjan, Shaykh Hussain Darwish and Shaykh Muhammad Darwish.

In late 2008 he moved to Amman, Jordan, where he continued his studies for the next six years, in Fiqh, Usul al-Fiqh, Theology, Hadith Methodology and Commentary, Shama’il, and Logic with teachers such as Dr Ashraf Muneeb, Dr Salah Abu’l-Hajj, Dr Hamza al-Bakri, Shaykh Ahmad Hasanat, Dr Mansur Abu Zina amongst others. He was also given two licences of mastery in the science of Qur’anic recital by Shakh Samir Jabr and Shaykh Yahya Qandil.

His true passion, however, arose in the presence of Shaykh Ali Hani, considered by many to be one of the foremost tafsir scholars of our time who provided him with the keys to the vast knowledge of the Quran. With Shaykh Ali, he was able to study an extensive curriculum of Qur’anic Sciences, Tafsir, Arabic Grammar, and Rhetoric.

When he finally left Jordan for the UK in 2014, Shaykh Ali gave him his distinct blessing and still recommends students in the UK to seek out Shaykh Abdul-Rahim for Quranic studies. Since his return he has trained as a therapist and has helped a number of people overcome emotional and psychosomatic issues. He is a keen promoter of emotional and mental health.