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Some of the Proper Manners of Service (khidma) Ones Teachers—and in All Religious Activism – Habib Umar bin Hafiz

Some of the Proper Manners of Service (khidma) Ones Teachers—and in All Religious Activism

Muwasala—an excellent resource for reliable Islamic guidance—share the following response from Habib Umar bin Hafiz:

What are some of the etiquettes of service (khidma)? [Muwasala]

[The Intention in Serving]

Any type of service, whether it be service of a shaykh or anyone else, should be conducted with the intention of purifying the soul by means of the benefit that comes about through it

[All Benefit Is Service]

Being a cause of any kind of benefit is in fact a type of service.

[The Reality of Service]

Assisting the shaykh in implementing his objectives or assisting anyone in implementing any objective which is valid in the Shariah is a type of service.

[What Service is Most Spiritually Beneficial?]

Any action which requires humility is more beneficial for the soul, such as cleaning, washing and cooking. An important etiquette is to keep the private affairs of the shaykh or anyone else being served secret.

[Sincerely Seeking The Pleasure of Allah in Serving is the Key]

The person serving should have sincerity at all times and should believe that he benefits himself through his service and not that he is doing a favour to those he is serving.

Muwasala is an online repository for the scholarly teachings of the blessed tradition of Ḥaḍramawt. The word muwasala simultaneously means “connection” and “continuity.” These two words explain the underlying purpose of this website: to open the doors for seekers to benefit from one of the great scholarly traditions of the Ummah, firstly by establishing a connection to its teachings, and secondly by embarking upon a continual path of study.

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Serve and Serve Again (30 Days, 30 Deeds), by Shaykh Muhammad Adeyinka Mendes

Serve and Serve Again, by Shaykh Muhammad Adeyinka Mendes

30 Days, 30 Deeds
Sacred Acts to Transform the Heart

Every night, our scholars in residence explore one simple deed that could have far reaching spiritual impact on our lives – and the lives of others. Every day we’ll make the intention to put that teaching into practice. Whether it’s forgiving someone who’s wronged us or putting service to others at the top of our list of priorities, these powerful lessons will remind us of the great gift the Prophet ﷺ‎  gave us: the best of character.

Daily at 8:10 pm EST. Attend in person at SeekersHub Toronto or watch live. 

 

 

Let’s #GiveLight to Millions More

We envision a world in which no one is cut off from the beauty, mercy and light of the Prophetic ﷺ example. A world where the dark ideology of a few is dwarfed by radiant example of the many who follow the way of the Prophet ﷺ. But we can’t do it alone. We need your support. This Ramadan, we need you to help us #GiveLight to millions more. Here’s how.

 

Photo by Rui Duarte.

Let’s Make an Impact. Can you Volunteer Some Time?

Volunteer your time to call your friends and family to Allah

What does it take to get 300, 500 or even 700 people out for an event?
The answer is simple: rallying.
Join us for this month’s Impact Meeting on April 17th.
Time:
1pm  on-ground at SeekersHub Toronto (for lunch)
1:30pm online [live-streamed]
[Convert to your timezone]
Online guests, pleae join us at 1:30pm
Rallying friends and family, spreading the word and creating a buzz, are proven to be of the most successful ways to bringing people out to an event.
volunteer
For us, it’s about reaching out to people to come to SeekersHub Toronto – one of the most worthy of places to call people to. It has exactly what we need today: the beauty, mercy and radiant guidance and teachings of our beloved Prophet ﷺ .
Here are three reasons to attend on April 17th at 1pm at SeekersHub Toronto and Online:
1. Be the first to hear about what the Hub is planning for the next few months and which visiting scholars are invited and coming!
2. Be part of immense good; the prophet ﷺ teaches us:
“Whoever points to the good has the reward of the one who performs it.” [Muslim]
3. If you’re local, join us for a lunch with Shaykh Faraz Rabbani to spread the word about this gem in Toronto far and wide, for everyone to benefit from.
Whether you are in China, Malaysia, Egypt or right here in Toronto, join us and help spread the immense benefit to everyone, everywhere.
Where’s This Awesome Meeting Happening?
ON-GROUND: 5650 Tomken Rd, Unit 16-17, Mississauga, ON, L4W 4P1
ONLINE: Click here to bookmark the URL for access on Sunday

Muslim Communal Obligation: Stories That Will Have You In Tears

Imagine spending years saving up for hajj. And then imagine, not being able to go because you gave all your money away, but Allah accepts your hajj anyway. This is the story of Ali, a humble cobbler from Damascus whose random act of sacrifice fulfilled the Muslim communal obligation – fard kifayah – of hundreds of thousands of others.
Imagine facing Allah on the Day of Judgement, while standing next to a man, woman or child from your community who suffered neglect, abuse, injustice hunger and deprivation. What will our excuse be? “I thought someone else would take care of it” might not cut it.

Every single Muslim needs to hear this khutbah by Imam Khalid Latif.


Imam Khalid Latif - Muslim Communal ObligationImam Khalid Latif is a University Chaplain for New York University, Executive Director of the Islamic Center at NYU, and a Chaplain for the NYPD. He is also the co-founder of Honest Chops, the first-ever all-natural/organic halal butcher in NYC, the Muslim Wedding Service, an agency specializing in providing charismatic and inspirational marriage officiants for wedding ceremonies. Sincere thanks to ICNYU for the recording of his Friday prayer sermon on Muslim communal obligation, or fard kifayah.

Resources on Muslim communal obligation:

Interview with One of Egypt’s Neglected Poor

An interview with a poor, elderly Egyptian lady. A thought-provoking reminder for all of us. What sort of perspective do we have on difficulties?