FORA.tv – Michael Pollan on Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual

FORA.tv – Michael Pollan on Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual

Michael Pollan, one of the best-known names in food-related issues, offers a guide about health and food. Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual is a set of memorable ideas for eating wisely. Many of them are drawn from a variety of ethnic or cultural traditions. Whether at the supermarket or an all-you-can-eat buffet, this handy, pocket-size resource is for people who would like to become more mindful of what they are eating.

Pollan is the author of Food Rule: An Eater’s Manual, In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto, The Omnivore’s Dilemma and The Botany of Desire.

Food Rules: An Eater's Manual

Making 70 Excuses for Others in Islam – A Key Duty of Brotherhood

In the Name of Allah, the Benevolent, the Merciful

Hamdun al-Qassar, one of the great early Muslims, said, “If a friend among your friends errs, make seventy excuses for them. If your hearts are unable to do this, then know that the shortcoming is in your own selves.” [Imam Bayhaqi, Shu`ab al-Iman, 7.522]

Imam Ghazali (Allah have mercy upon him) also quotes this in the Ihya.
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The Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) said, “Overlook the slips of respected people.” [Bukhari in al-Adab al-Mufrad; Abu Dawud; Nasa’i in al-Kubra; and others–rigorously authentic (sahih), from A’isha (Allah be pleased with her)]

The General Basis for Making Excuses

Ibn Ajiba (Allah have mercy upon him) mentions that making excuses for others returns to the Prophet’s words (peace and blessings be upon him) that, “A believer is a mirror of the believer.” [Abu Dawud, from Abu Hurayra (Allah be pleased with him); sound (hasan)] So what you see in your brethren is a reflection of what is within you–so beware.

The way of purity and sincerity is to look at everyone–friend and foe–with the eye of sincere concern (nasiha) and mercy. The Messenger of Allah (peace and blessings be upon him) said that, “Religion is sincere concern (ad-dinu’n nasiha).” [Muslim and Nasa’i, from Tamim ad-Dari] And, “It is only the merciful who are granted mercy by the All-Merciful. Be merciful to those on earth and the Lord of the Heavens will be merciful to you.” And, “None of you believes until they wish for others as they wish for themselves.” [Abu Dawud and Tirmidhi, from Abdullah ibn Amr (Allah be pleased with him); soundly authentic (hasan sahih) according to Tirmidhi]

This is why Abdullah ibn Muhammad ibn Munazil (Allah have mercy upon him), of the early Muslims, said, “The believer seeks excuses for their brethren, while the hypocrite seeks out the faults of their brethren.” [Sulami, Adab al-Suhba]

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2006/20061026/jk.jpgWhy 70 Excuses?

This is because the default assumption about all humans and their actions is that they are sound and free of error. This is considered our operating certainty.After this, if we find something that makes us doubt about them, we are not permitted to leave this operating certainty that they did not err for mere doubts or misgivings.

Allah Most High commanded us: “Believers! Leave much doubt, for most doubt is sinful.” [Qur’an, 49.12]

The doubts and misgivings about others that are sinful are those that do not have a sound basis that would be sufficient to leave our operating assumption about others that they are upright and their actions free of error.

And Allah alone gives success.

Faraz Rabbani

Seeking Allah in All One’s Actions – Magnifying, Multiplying, and Recording Intentions in Islam – Faraz Rabbani – YouTube Video

YouTube – Seeking Allah in All One’s Actions – Multiplying and Recording Intentions – Faraz Rabbani

Allah Most High has called His servants to seek Him in all they do, and the Prophet (Allah bless him and give him peace) has explained that, “Each person shall have whatever they intended.” From this and other Prophetic teachings, the scholars recommend magnifying and multiplying one’s intentions. This short reply by Faraz Rabbani of SeekersGuidance  explains how to do so, and about recording one’s intentions.

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Man’s Indebtedness to Allah (exalted be He) – Sayyid Naquib al-Attas

Man’s Indebtedness to Allah (exalted be He)

by Sayyid Naquib al-Attas

The following excerpt is from “Prolegemona to the Metaphysics of Islam: An Exposition of the Fundamental Elements of the Worldview of Islam” by Sayyid Naquib al-Attas. In it, he challenges the modern portrayal of man as a rational agent with independent creative capabilities and powers. al-Attas uses several ayahs of the Qur’an to remind us that all human beings are created in a state of absolute neediness to Allah (exalted be He)- the one who is absolutely free from all needs.

The mere fact of existence places man in a state of debt the moment he is created. As Allah (exalted be He) is the Master, Creator, and Sustainer of the universe – man cannot utilize material things to repay this debt as he is not their proper owner. The only way man can ever repay his momentous debt to his Creator is by engaging in khidmah (service) to others and humbly submitting his very self to His pronouncements.

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“How can the concept of being indebted be explained in the religious and spiritual context? – one may ask; what is the nature of the debt?, and to whom is the debt owed?

We answer that man is indebted to God, his Creator and provider, for bringing him into existence and maintaining him in existence. Man was once nothing and did not exist, and now he is.

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My Father Was Smarter Than I Thought – Faraz Rabbani

My Father Was Smarter Than I Thought
By: Faraz Rabbani

While growing up, fathers can seem rather annoying to their children. My father didn’t really seem to do all that much, but expected all these seemingly unreasonable things from me. Why, I’d wonder, why?

Now, with children of my own, my father seems a much smarter parent than I thought he was. Maybe he was on to something.

It would annoy me to no end, especially when I was in high school and later in college, that anyone who was home was expected to have lunch and dinner — and on weekends, breakfast — with the family. Non-presence was a non-option.

We had been raised to listen to our parents, and this expectation would be enforced without recourse to any disciplining (besides the fatherly frown when my sister or I tried to opt out).

It would annoy me to no end that there was usually no opting out of less-than-exciting “family outings,” some of which were just bland trips to boring uncle-types with their predictable conversations (and, yes, great food).

It would annoy me to no end that the entire family was normally expected to go on “family shopping trips” for nothing more exciting than buying the weekly groceries.

Some other things weren’t so annoying, but they didn’t seem related to good parenting in any way — at least back then.

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Shaykh Yahya Rhodus in Toronto this Friday (Feb 12) – The Prophet : Knowing The Best Example – 7 pm at ISNA Centre – Qurba & Lote Tree

Facebook | Free Public Lecture: Shaykh Yahya Rhodus

Qurba Academy in conjunction with ISNA Canada and Lote Tree Learning & Resource Centre is excited to announce that Shaykh Yahya Rhodus will be holding a free public lecture this Fri night at 7pm at ISNA Canada. The talk is titled The Prophet : Knowing The Best Example. Please spread the word. We look forward to seeing you on Friday.

Shaykh Yahya is presently teaching Faith in Divine Unity & Trust in Divine Providence and The Marvels of the Heart, two courses from Imam Ghazali’s Ihya `Ulum al-Din (Reawakening Religious Knowledge), at SeekersGuidance (www.SeekersGuidance.org)


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Facebook | Free Public Lecture: Shaykh Yahya Rhodus

Sending blessings (salawat) on the Prophet Muhammad – End of Majlis (Jakarta, Indonesia, Jan 2010)

YouTube – Sending blessings (salawat) on the Prophet Muhammad – End of Majlis (Jakarta, Indonesia, Jan 2010)

Faraz Rabbani, Sh. Sa’ad al-Attas, Sh. Ahmad Tijani Ben Omar, Ustadz Yusuf Mansur, Kiyai Saifuddin Amsir and others at Masjid al-Madinah (Jakarta, Indonesia). January 2010

Raising Pious Children & Loving the Messenger (peace be upon him) – Lote Tree Learning & Resource Centre

Raising Pious Children & Loving the Messenger (peace be upon him) – Lote Tree Learning & Resource Centre

Raising Pious Children & Loving the Messenger (peace be upon him) – Lote Tree Learning & Resource Centre
with Sh. Faraz Rabbani, Sh. Sa’ad al-Attas, Sh. Tanvir Hussain, and Sh. Zahid Ally
March 6 & 7, 2010
(10 am – 5 pm)
Malton Islamic Centre
6836 Professional Court, Mississauga
Cost: $40/person. $70/family
Register at www.LoteTree.ca


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Ten Adab of Seekers of Knowledge – Notes by Ayaz Siddiqui

Ten Adab of Seekers of Knowledge

by Ayaz Siddiqui

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Recently, I’ve been taking an interest in learning about manners that every person, Muslim or Non-Muslim should adopt. Islam has a lot to offer in this area, through the examples of the Prophet (may Allah bless him and grant him peace) as well as his Companions. The Prophet (may Allah bless him and grant him peace) said “The only reason I have been sent is to perfect good manners”. What piqued my interest in this area was my interest in the topic of Tazkiyyah, which I have been interested in for a number of years.

In pursuit of learning more about Tazkiyyah, I bought “Purification of the Heart: Signs, Symptoms, and Cures of the Spiritual Diseases of the Heart.” In this book, Shaykh Hamza Yusuf provides commentary on Imam al-Mawlud’s Matharat al-Qalb. In this book, Shaykh Hamza provides commentary on the following verses from Imam Mawlud’s work:

“I begin by starting with the heart of beginnings,

For it the highest and noblest of beginnings.”

Commenting on these two lines, Shaykh Hamza informs us that, as is often the case, we have lost some intricacies of these two verses due to translation. Focusing in on “heart of beginnings”, the word for beginning in Arabic is ba’du and the word for heart in Arabic is qalb. Another meaning of qalb in Arabic is to reverse, so in Arabic this phrase can also be read as “qalb ba’du” or “reverse beginning”. If we take this literally, what happens if we reverse the word ba’du? In Arabic, we get the word adaab, which means to be courteous, but also to have good manners, morals, etiquettes, etc.

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Ya Arham al-Rahimin (O Most Merciful!) from Mawlid with Habib Munzir al-Musawwa – YouTube

YouTube – Ya Arham al-Rahimin (O Most Merciful!) from Mawlid with Habib Munzir al-Musawwa

A powerful clip from the weekly mawlid of Habib Munzir al-Musawwa of Jakarta (Indonesia). Faraz Rabbani of SeekersGuidance (https://seekersguidance.org) was in attendance as part of the January 2010 Arus Damai tour. See: http://www.majelisrasulullah.org/ and http://www.arusdamai.com)

Habib Munzir al-Musawwa (http://www.majelisrasulullah.org/) focusses his call (da`wah) towards youth–particularly those in dire poverty, and those stuck in crime, drugs, and distance from the ways of deen.

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